The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association

Workplace Sexual Harassment

In the past year, the #MeToo movement has swept across the globe, drawing attention to the issue of sexual harassment faced by women in countries around the world. But this is by no means a new issue, and the workplace is often rife with incidents of harassment. It can be difficult to escape harassment in the workplace because victims often fear the consequences to their career and otherwise if they step forward and address the perpetrators. Talking about the issues that women face is an important first step in remedying them, but talk is not enough – concrete actions must be taken. Many UN bodies (such as ILO, UNICEF, and UNDP) have existing policies on discrimination, harassment, and abuse of authority that may provide a groundwork of ideas upon which this body can build.

 

In May 2018, the Chief Executives Board (comprised of 31 chief executives of UN agencies, funds and programs) held a special session during their meeting in the UK to address sexual harassment. The Board recognized harassment as stemming from a broader culture of discrimination and privilege, deeply rooted in gender inequality. The chiefs pledged to encourage action in three key areas: reporting, investigation and decision-making. In July 2018, UN Women organized a two-day event to bring together feminist thinkers and gender experts to discuss and inform UN Women’s current work on harassment, with a publication on sexual harassment and assault due out in the fall of 2018. UN Secretary-General António Guterres also established a specialized task force on sexual harassment in November 2017, which works to further the prevention and investigation of harassment, as well as to better support the victims of harassment.

 

UN Women has the opportunity to outline policy and protocol to aid women’s struggle against harassment in the workplace worldwide. When addressing this highly sensitive topic, it is important to take into account the differing situations of women in various countries, regions, and industries. Not all workplaces look the same. Harassment does not only occur in corporate offices with human resources departments, or in industries which receive global media attention. It may be useful for this committee to pay attention to previously established UN definitions for terms such as discrimination, harassment, and sexual harassment. It is also important to recognize that harassment comes in other forms than sexual harassment. How can this committee work to take both preventative and corrective measures to protect women from harassment in the workplace? What factors prevent women from coming forward when they are victims of harassment, and how can those factors be addressed? Facilitating an open discussion about these topics and developing specific policies is essential in correcting issues that have been a part of workplace culture around the world for far too long.

  • Rachelthomas04
    Rachelthomas04 November 9, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    The State of Kuwait
    Rachel Thomas

    More than 80% of women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in the workplace. There is difficulty in discerning the definition of sexual harassment, but some examples are: unwelcome or inappropriate sexual advances, sending suggestive messages, making unsuitable sexual gestures or noises, voicing offensive comments, stalking, or making sexual remarks. Less than half of women end up actually filing a complaint, due to fear of the potential career and social repercussions. Women should feel comfortable at work in order to perform to their maximum capability. Sexual harassment can lead to physical effects such as muscle aches, high blood pressure, or in the long run, heart issues. Some mental effects include post traumatic stress disorder, depression, panic attacks, and anxiety. Although Kuwait ranks highest in the UNDP gender-related development index, we are not an exception to this problem. Sexual harassment is still prevalent in our country; however, few instances have been reported due to the fear women hold of being ostracized.

    Article 191 of the Kuwait Penal Code states that any person who sexually harasses through “hate, threats, or deceit” shall be punished to up to 15 years of imprisonment, while Article 192 of the code states that any person who sexually harasses without these specific three shall be punished to up to 10 years of imprisonment. If the harasser is related to the victim or under his/her upbringing (ex: uncle/aunt, teacher) then he/she receives imprisonment for life. Additionally, underage and mentally unwell perpetrators receive a life imprisonment. The Philippines has recently permanently banned citizens from working in Kuwait (despite the country’s reliance on the income from its Kuwaiti-based workers) due to an instance where a Filipino maid was found dead in a freezer with evidence of torture on her body. The couple convicted of the crime was sentenced to death. The legal system regarding sexual harassment may be harsh, but justice is served to those who come forward.

    The State of Kuwait recommends that other countries follow our lead and establish strict and harsh punishments for those who have committed sexual harassment. A comprehensive and detailed list that clearly defines types of sexual harassment in the workplace would potentially help countries effectively legislate cases. Additionally, victims should be encouraged to step forward and report cases of harassment, through a secure and just legal system. Kuwait would also support a program to educate and train workers in appropriate workplace behavior. Ultimately, Kuwait is committed to ensuring a safe and comfortable workplace for all workers.

  • Waterupmynose
    Waterupmynose November 12, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
    Indonesia
    Jackson Montuoro

    The idea that individual countries should have differing views on a topic such as this is ludicrous; sexual harassment in the workplace is an offence to both the respect of women in the workplace and the ideals of an equal society. We believe it is wrong for a woman’s income to be threatened if she were to combat her superior or colleague for her right to be undisturbed, which is why Indonesia supports the policies defined in the International Labor Organization’s “Sexual harassment at workplace” subclause. Indonesia, while economically growing and progressing, is plagued by generations of an oppressively patriarchal social structure. The government of Indonesia would like to see a transformation from this existing societal infrastructure, but is apprehensive to make harsh or strict punishments in the name of personal liberties and the gradients of wrongdoing integral to this sort of problem.
    Indonesia has officially and politically adopted the policies laid out by the International Labor Organization (ILO), and while female public workers are less subject to male harassment than their private industry counterparts, problems outside of the government are much a harder to crack down on. Indonesia has seen the recent rise of female support groups and social clubs made to combat such issues, but the government has not given them direct support and assistance.
    In this committee, Indonesia would like to learn more from other nations, especially western ones. Indonesia does not have any plans to introduce a working paper to directly combat this issue without the direct support of many other nations which have established these goals. This is because we do not believe we have the current tools or general public support to efficiently enforce these rules and would like the help from other nations to legitimize our plans. With support and information from countries more successful in this regard, Indonesia believes it can then best address this issue.

  • Jsobol25
    Jsobol25 November 12, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Turkey
    James Sobol

    In past years, many victims have come out to the media, reporting cases of sexual harassment in the workplace. The #MeToo movement has become a common subject in many households across the world as victims shared their stories after many years of silence. The UN has recognized that sexual harassment stems from discrimination and deeply rooted privilege.
    Turkey experiences many cases of sexual harassment in the workplace. Their government does not approve of any cases of sexual harassment, but like most countries, Turkey experiences lots of sexual harassment. Turkey’s number of sexual harassment cases has greatly increased in the last ten years from 5,243 reported cases in 2006 to 13,247 reported cases in 2016. Turkey’s government, like most governments, does not approve of sexual harassment, but it occurs all over their country.
    There are many solutions for the problem of sexual harassment in workplaces. Turkey has several suggestions to the stopping of sexual harassment in the workplace. One of these is to have increased police force at common workplaces so that people feel safer and if any incidents occur then the victims can speak directly with law enforcement and feel more protected when coming forward. Another solution that Turkey has come up with is stricter punishments for persons committing sexual harassment crimes. Since they are stricter punishments, people committing these crimes would be punished more harshly ;thus, people would be more afraid of committing sexual harassment crimes at the workplace.

  • Priya.patel
    Priya.patel November 13, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Republic of El Salvador
    Priya Patel

    The UN defines workplace harassment as “any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favour, verbal or physical conduct or gesture of a sexual nature, or any other behaviour of a sexual nature (including pornography, sexually-colored remarks) that has or that might reasonably be expected or be perceived to cause offense or humiliation to another.” Sexual harassment may interfere with work, be made a condition of employment, or create an intimidating and hostile work environment. The pervasive problem sparked a global discussion when women started the viral #MeToo movement in 2017 to share their experiences of sexual harassment in the workplace. In May 2018, the Chief Executives Board of the UN encouraged action in the decision-making, reporting, and investigation of sexual harassment. Secretary-General António Guterres noted in February 2018 that sexual harassment is rooted in historical power imbalances between men and women and established a Task Force to address harassment and increase support for victims.

    In January 2018, El Salvador passed a new provision titled the Special Comprehensive Law for a Life Free of Violence against Women to guarantee women the right to leave a workplace if faced with psychological or physical abuse. This provision, along with the Law of Equality, Equity and Eradication of Discrimination against Women, ensures the prevention of discriminatory behavior and violence against women in their workplaces and enforces the gender equality principle. Heavy fines and judicial actions are utilized to punish the mocking, disparaging, and isolation of women, along with mental, physical, and sexual violence against them in their workplaces. El Salvador also supports international decrees such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights because it recognizes the importance of women’s economic activity and its impact on improving the standard of living. While there are laws regarding sexual harassment, employees generally do not report their experiences in fear of employer reprisals or negative consequences to their career development and mental and physical health. A Latin American study estimated that only around 5% of adult victims of sexual violence report the incident. Oftentimes, cases of workplace sexual harassment go unprosecuted and there are no consequences for the harasser; this must be remedied through stricter and more comprehensive legislation.

    El Salvador recommends that the UN Women committee focus on implementing standards for workplace programs educating employees on sexual harassment policies and bystander intervention. It is also important to offer more protection for victims and whistleblowers to increase the likelihood of harassment being reported.

  • Anishpremkumar
    Anishpremkumar November 13, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Italy
    Anish Premkumar

    Women all around the world are being sexually harassed every day. This problem is seen in every country, especially Italy. In Italy, almost half of women reported that they have been sexually abused. While this problem is worldwide, many countries have seemed to not take action. Sexual harassment in the workplace has caused many women to decline important job offers to not have a job at all. It affects women in every way: economically, emotionally and physically. This issue remains pertinent in the world today and must be vocalized during the UN Women committee. In recent years, Italy has attempted to take steps to address violence against women and domestic violence in general. However, this has not seemed to diminish the violence that women are facing in our country. Italy believes this topic is vital and may affect millions of young women living in our world.

    This issue is extremely prevalent in Italy. However, Italy has been relatively liberal about the issue. In Florence, defense lawyers for paramilitary police officers accused of raping two young American women sought to ask the accusers if they had been wearing underwear one night. In Sicily, a court cleared a man of sexual harassment charges, determining that sophomoric humor, rather than sexual intent, had motivated his groping of colleagues. “For us, defending women is a priority and it always has been,” said Mr. Berlusconi, who was the man who was cleared of soliciting underage prostitutes in his work however is still fighting charges that he bribed a witness. Italy seems to not do much to men who commit sexual harassment acts. In the past, they have attempted to increase consequences however men in Italy do not seem to change or care about these harsh consequences. Italy has attempted to publicize records of sexual abusers, however this has not passed in the gocernemnt currently. The government of Italy seems to push back many large sexual abuse cases due to the current economy and the hardships it is going through however they are attempting to make a change immediately.

    Italy proposes solutions to assist organizations that tackle the fight against workplace sexual harassment with financial and political needs. Also, Italy believes to punish sexual abusers with harsher penalties around the world. Italy also proposes a country-wide sexual abuse hotline where victims can call and give information of recent cases. This solution has seemed to work in many developed countries so the implementation will help diminish this worldwide issue. We hope that many developing countries with sexual abuse being a large problem follow rules and penalties of countries where this may not be an issue.

  • Zrosario2002
    Zrosario2002 November 13, 2018 Reply

    11-13-18
    SUBMITTED TO: United Nations Women
    FROM: Federal Republic of Somalia
    SUBJECT: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Harassment in the workplace is a problem that faces every country in the world. With the fear of losing their career and other repercussions, women are less likely to report workplace sexual violence, which makes it hard for justice to be served when something goes wrong. Somalia, as a country that faces many problems dealing with gender discrimination and violence, is no stranger to this issue.
    The constitution of Somalia recognizes harassment in the workplace for women as a serious issue. Article 24 Section 5 states “All workers, particularly women, shall have a special right of protection from sexual abuse, segregation and discrimination in the workplace. Every labour law and practice shall comply with gender equality in the workplace.” This acknowledgment though is just the start in implementing a sure way of protecting women in the workplace.
    As previously stated, Somalia has a history of deeply rooted gender inequality. The patriarchal social life of the Somali people makes it easy for sexual violence to take place with little consequence to the violators. Therefore, when writing a resolution for this issue it is essential that we prioritize motivating women to report sexual violence. Jean Lokenga, head of UNICEF Child Protection in Somalia, states that we must,”treat cases of gender-based violence in a way that encourages people to continue reporting cases” (CNN). Eliminating harassment in the workplace starts with the victims. If the victims are too scared or don’t have means to report their experiences, then there is no hope in eradicating this problem.
    Furthermore, we must also keep in mind the importance of easy access to the justice system for women. According to UN Women, “Women’s access [in Somalia] to justice is restricted both within the formal, clan based and sharia-based judicial systems.” We must prioritize making it easier for women to report no matter what judicial system the country utilizes. The government must be able to do its job of serving justice for these women, and the women cannot reach justice if their access to the judicial system is limited. How can we make access to the justice system easier in a way that works for all varieties of justice systems?
    UN Women also states, “In terms of women’s economic empowerment, women in Somalia generally have a weak position in the labour market and represent a large proportion of people in vulnerable employment.” If our focus shifts to empowering women so they have a more stable position in the labor market, there would be less of a worry of losing a career when women have to report harassment in the workplace. Are there any established programs we can utilize to empower women in the workplace in countries like Somalia that struggle with this?
    The #MeToo movement is a sure sign that global progress is just around the corner, which we firmly believe. We must start at the root of the problem though if we hope to advance in protecting women’s’ rights. Somalia is confident that this committee will be able to make great strides in progress so women can receive the justice they deserve.

  • Emkinnicutt
    Emkinnicutt November 13, 2018 Reply

    Throughout the course of history, women have had to face endless amounts of harassment, abuse, and discrimination. One specific example of this that is prominent in our continually progressing economy is that of sexual harassment in the workplace. Sexual harassment can range from a sexual advance to request for sexual favour, or even just conduct or gesture of a sexual nature. Any behavior of a sexual nature that can be interpreted as offensive or humiliating can constitute as sexual harassment. Sexual harassment occurring in a work environment commonly is due to a power difference, with female employees fearing professional repercussions from male employers if they were to report anything. It must be recognized that men also do face issues of sexual harassment, but more often than not, it is women who are subject to harassment. Approximately two billion, or 80%, of women throughout the world over the age of 18 have experienced some form of sexual harassment in their life. This is quite worrying considering the plethora of long-lasting effects that sexual harassment can have on one’s life. From depression and anxiety to high blood pressure and cardiovascular issues, any occurrence of sexual harassment can cause negative psychological and physical results. Côte d’Ivoire, like the rest of the world, faces this issue of trying to deal with sexual harassment.

    Action is currently being taken in Côte d’Ivoire, but currently, no legislation has been passed along the lines of sexual harassment, especially in the workplace. Regardless, there are many government-run education and women empowerment campaigns circulating throughout the country. These empowerment campaigns have the intention of creating jobs for women to rise into positions of power to prevent power differences. The education campaigns are designed to teach children and businesses proper workplace conduct, especially in relation to women. We are also currently working with other countries (many African countries) to figure out the best approach to this issue, considering the culture and tradition in each country, and the best way to work around it, or even possibly modify it, so that women can enjoy their inalienable rights as people. In the past, our government has been criticized for the lack of legislative action that we have taken on this subcategory of sexual violence, and we acknowledge that something must be done.

    Côte d’Ivoire urges that both preventative and facilitative measures be taken to overcome sexual harassment. To decrease the number of harassment incidents that occur, we recommend that other countries utilize women empowerment movements to allow less opportunities for these incidents to take place and to encourage women not to fear speaking out. The State Of Côte d’Ivoire would like to request that companies put into place initiatives to allow more ease for women who want to report cases of sexual harassment. We would request that NGOs also focus on training employees and employers to deal with these cases properly. Overall, Côte d’Ivoire would like to create a work environment in which female employees feel safe and values, especially considering their immense value to the growing economy of our country and the world.

    • Emkinnicutt
      Emkinnicutt November 13, 2018 Reply

      Country: Côte d’Ivoire
      Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
      Committee: UN Women
      Name: Emily Kinnicutt
      School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

  • Trucy.phan
    Trucy.phan November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Brazil
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Delegate: Trucy Phan

    Sexual harassment is by no means a new issue. It has, however, become a more prominent, global subject in the past year as the #MeToo movement was brought to the attention of the public. Women face sexual harassment in every country of the world and with the #MeToo movement, thousands of individuals are coming forward about their personal stories. Sexual harassment in the workplace is becoming a significant issue. Victims often time do not report incidents of sexual misconduct immediately because they fear the consequences it may bring to their job or career. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcomed physical, verbal or written sexual behavior that is meant to offend, humiliate or intimidate a person. In May 2018, the UN Chief Executive Board came together to have a session during their meeting in the United Kingdom dedicated to the topic of sexual harassment. The board recognized that this issue is directly related to gender inequality, and pledged to encourage action to help those that have been harrassed and for prevention overall. UN Secretary-General António Guterres emphasized his personal commitment to advocate a “zero-tolerance approach to sexual harassment.” Feminists, gender experts and UN officials also came together in late July of 2018 to discuss potential solutions and practices to stop sexual harassment and assault. The United Nations must determine any legal action that can be taken to first, assist assault victims, and to second, combat all future harassment.
    Brazil would like to help contribute resources and ideas towards finding a long term solution for this pressing issue. Brazil’s culture is famous for its sensuality and hospitality, but it is also known for its “entrenched patriarchal traditions.” Brazilians have a difficult time facing this issue because of their affectionate culture. Casual touching and contact is common in Brazil, which makes it problematic to separate sexual harassment with affectionate greetings and conversations. Another factor that contributes to the problem is Brazil’s climate. Because of the warmer, tropical temperature, many women tend to wear more revealing attire to adjust to the heat. As a result, two-thirds of workers believe that their behavior and clothing has prompted sexualized remarks from others. Since 2001, sexual harassment has been a crime in Brazil, but has been criticized as “too narrow,” especially for a country where sexualized misbehavior is so widespread. According to a poll taken in November of 2017, 42%, which is more than four in ten women in Brazil claim to have been sexually harassed at a workplace, on the streets, or even at school. After the initial spread of the #MeToo movement, women in Brazil are taking a stand on the issue and demanding that more action be taken to end harassment in public places. This actually led to conflict because people against the movement claim that feminists are trying to change Brazilian culture. The citizens of Brazil, especially women, are hoping to find a legal and cultural solution for this issue.
    Brazil would like to wholeheartedly propose a resolution to protect women from harassment in all public areas, including the workplace. Brazil urges for nations to work together to not only provide assistance and justice for victims of sexual assault, but also come up with a resolution to help stop this social epidemic. Brazil’s solution to this problem includes stricter legal punishments of perpetrator, therapeutic help for victims, and more programs dedicated to educating employees about at workplaces. Brazil would also like to work with other countries that have sexual harassment problems as a result of tropical climates. Countries that Brazil expects to work with include Canada, France, Sweden, and the United States.

  • Hava
    Hava November 13, 2018 Reply

    Hava Szarafinski, Royal Oak High School
    11-11-2018
    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Ethiopia
    SUBJECT: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Women in nations all over the world work to provide for themselves and their family. It is crucial for women to be able to get jobs to earn money. Sadly, these women are also targets for sexual harassment at their workplace. It is in every country, not one is immune to these offences, yet some do nothing to prevent this from happening.
    Ethiopia is an African country with a population of over 100 million people, over half being women. For decades, our nation has been working to further the rights of women in hopes of achieving gender equality. Within the past year, we have elected our first female president, Sahle-Work Zewde, which shows the progress we have made with the standing of women in our nation. Despite our progress, we still struggle to protect women in our country from cruelty such as sexual harassment in the workplace. Many women in Ethiopia have joined the Yellow Movement, created to change culture of sexual harassment, which emphasizes the need for us to address this problem. We need to take actions against the harassment faced by our female citizens.
    Questions that need to be addresses about this subject include the following: What preventive actions can be placed to decrease these offences against women in the future? How do we encourage, and protect women to come forward?
    Ethiopia believes we need to educate the younger generation on the cruelty of sexual harassment and the harsh effects it has on its victims. We believe behavioral change in the younger demographic will be the most effective long term solution. Our nation also strongly encourages to creation of support systems for victims, and adapting a more serious attitude when presented with allegations of sexual harassment. An effective resolution would include the education of younger generations on sexual harassment, and creation of a support system for victims.
    This committee provides a platform to help further the safety and security of women within their countries. No longer do we idly stand by and let women get taken advantage of and let them suffer alone, now we need to support victims and prosecute perpetrators. Ethiopia is looking forward to discussion on this topic in committee, in hopes of creating a positive solution.

  • avatar image
    Siri November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Republic of Moldova
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Delegate: Siri Reed
    School: Williamston High School

    As a member of the ECOSOC committee, we fully recognize the uprising issue of harassment in the workplace. Sexual harassment can be defined as any improper and unwelcome sexual advance, whether it’s verbal or physical. Delegates should be aware that women and men can be offenders, and also victims, yet discrimination against women has always been the more prominent issue. Men and women are often silenced on this matter, making it difficult to report. At least 818 million reported women have experienced sexual harassment at home, in their communities, or at work.
    In Moldova, harassment in the workplace is an extreme issue. It is known that approximately each 5th woman in Moldova has been subject to this kind of matter, while another 20% of women have been verbally threatened or told to have sex by a higher position of power. Moldova has passed amendments to their penal code stating that sexual harassment and misconduct is a crime and will be handled accordingly. An employer is allowed to dismiss any employee under the labour code for any form of sexual disturbance or gender discrimination. It has been known though, for women to be silenced on their stories before being able to report. Moldova has also ratified the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women in 1994 stating that any discrimination based on gender, religion, race, or sexuality is prohibited in the workplace, or in the public eye.
    Moreover, Moldova is ready to take action on the concern of workplace harassment, and we are open to ideas to a resolution. We want to create a better legal framework that will protect victims of sexual misconduct in the workplace. This may include policies that encourage reporting so that women feel safe from retribution and tightening laws and repercussions when harassment is reported. Workplaces shall clearly define what sexual harassment is, and that there will be a no tolerance procedure against the offender in reported cases. Training employees to recognize when sexual misconduct is taking place, and how to report it, is important. This also goes for supervisors and managers, and what they should do when a case is reported to them. An important note is that the UN has had its own recent troubles with sexual harassment, so it’s evident that this is a widespread issue, and it is extremely hard to eliminate.

  • avatar image
    Jasmyne November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Israel
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School
    Workplace sexual harassment is “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of asexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.” There is more than just sexual harassment. Quid Pro Quo (Something for Something) Harassment, hostile environment, retaliation, and unlawful harassment are also forms of harassment that women all over the world go through. The biggest issue of this epidemic is that women feel as though they can’t come forward if they are experiencing this harassment.
    Israel currently has a code in place to aid harassment in the workplace called, The Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment. ​The code is a structured and systematic tool for dealing with the phenomenon, and its purpose is to assist employers in implementing the law and in creating a respectful and clean organizational culture. Israel has experienced many cases of sexual harassment.​ ​In 2001, former Minister of Defense Yitzhak Mordechai was indicted for sexual assaults and resigned from public life in ignominy.​ ​In 2011, a former president Moshe Katsav was imprisoned, convicted of two counts of rape and other sexual offenses, much of which took place in his office. Lesser events, however, went unreported.
    Israel encourages all countries to adopt The Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment as a solution to this epidemic. The resolution condemns sexual harassment in all forms, especially against women and girls, and emphasizes the need to take measures to prevent and eliminate it, raise awareness, educate, promote research, and collect and analyze data and statistics.The code also applies to situations such as child athletes traveling to competitions accompanied by adult coaches, doctors and physical therapists. Israel expects employers to be eager to embrace the code in order to avoid lawsuits and the loss of productivity that comes from sexual harassment allegations due to absences, emotional stress and office gossip.Once these guidelines are embedded in the DNA of the organization they become easy to implement. Inspections of each participating workplace will take place every two years to determine if the standards set out in the code are being upheld. ​ ​A tailor-made intervention consisting of two days a year should be upheld that enables countries to specifically understand the special characteristics of sexual harassment in a specific organization and then develop a prevention program suited to the organization. The priority is to introduce the Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment in local municipalities, businesses and organizations that the association identifies as high risk – such as the military, police, healthcare organizations, airlines, media outlets and first-response networks – because of vulnerability factors such as big gaps in age and gender (usually, older men supervising young women), night time working hours and frequent operations outside the office environment.

  • avatar image
    Jasmyne Bush November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Israel
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School
    Workplace sexual harassment is “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of asexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual’s work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.” There is more than just sexual harassment. Quid Pro Quo (Something for Something) Harassment, hostile environment, retaliation, and unlawful harassment are also forms of harassment that women all over the world go through. The biggest issue of this epidemic is that women feel as though they can’t come forward if they are experiencing this harassment.
    Israel currently has a code in place to aid harassment in the workplace called, The Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment. ​The code is a structured and systematic tool for dealing with the phenomenon, and its purpose is to assist employers in implementing the law and in creating a respectful and clean organizational culture. Israel has experienced many cases of sexual harassment.​ ​In 2001, former Minister of Defense Yitzhak Mordechai was indicted for sexual assaults and resigned from public life in ignominy.​ ​In 2011, a former president Moshe Katsav was imprisoned, convicted of two counts of rape and other sexual offenses, much of which took place in his office. Lesser events, however, went unreported.
    Israel encourages all countries to adopt The Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment as a solution to this epidemic. The resolution condemns sexual harassment in all forms, especially against women and girls, and emphasizes the need to take measures to prevent and eliminate it, raise awareness, educate, promote research, and collect and analyze data and statistics.The code also applies to situations such as child athletes traveling to competitions accompanied by adult coaches, doctors and physical therapists. Israel expects employers to be eager to embrace the code in order to avoid lawsuits and the loss of productivity that comes from sexual harassment allegations due to absences, emotional stress and office gossip.Once these guidelines are embedded in the DNA of the organization they become easy to implement. Inspections of each participating workplace will take place every two years to determine if the standards set out in the code are being upheld. ​ ​A tailor-made intervention consisting of two days a year should be upheld that enables countries to specifically understand the special characteristics of sexual harassment in a specific organization and then develop a prevention program suited to the organization. The priority is to introduce the Voluntary Code Against Sexual Harassment in local municipalities, businesses and organizations that the association identifies as high risk – such as the military, police, healthcare organizations, airlines, media outlets and first-response networks – because of vulnerability factors such as big gaps in age and gender (usually, older men supervising young women), night time working hours and frequent operations outside the office environment.

  • Stenorioo
    Stenorioo November 13, 2018 Reply

    COMMITTEE: UN Women
    COUNTRY: People’s Republic of China
    TOPIC A: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    DELEGATE: Sofía Tenorio Olguín
    SCHOOL: Instituto Educativo Olinca

    Despite the fact that in China there has been a scant number of lawsuits related to sexual harassment in the workplace, that does not imply women do not suffer from this type of abuse. According to a survey showed by Human Rights Watch, 40 percent of women have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace at least once in their lives.This is due to the fact that part of the Chinese society still has the ancient traditions that consider women inferior and hence have to serve men, as well as they are urged especially by male leaders not to expose them. The majority of the times, women are fearful of not getting support. In the cases that have occurred, women came to be not well seen by society, since many considered that they have insulted an authority figure.
    This becomes a major complication for the government, as it acknowledges that women should let their voice be heard to put into action the appropriate consequences for the abusers. However, thanks to the #MeToo movement, the government realized that it is a must to fulfill the terms and conditions that have been already established, with the objective of giving victims justice. Also, at the present time, there have been more signs of Chinese women be more willing to speak out of this issue along with a bigger amount of people that are defending women’s rights and interests. Because of the aforementioned situations, it could be established that the Chinese society is globalizing and modernizing in order to respect the human rights of women and consider them as equals, just as the government fully recognizes them.
    For this reason, the government has implemented new policies and laws to prevent and eliminate this problem, such as the ones with reference to the Special Provisions for Labour Protection of Female Workers, which was adopted in 2012, with the objective of providing equality in opportunity and treatment; occupational safety and health. In addition, the Law of the People’s Republic of China on the Guarantee of the Rights and Interests of Women was created in 1992, which remarks that in violation of this law, the victim shall apply to a security organ for an administrative sanction against the violator according to law.
    The Chinese government always gives great importance to protecting the rights and interests of women and advancing their status. China is ready to continue to work with the international community, an active role in fighting sexual harassment in the workplace.

  • Amanda
    Amanda November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: United Kingdom
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Delegate: Amanda Jaworsky

    Workplace sexual harassment is a serious and pressing issue and in recent times it has become clear that the UK, as well as the rest of the world, needs to be doing more to prevent this than it has in the past. Though harassment has long been an issue, it is now becoming clear that it is a bigger issue than ever suspected in the past and the majority of it is going unreported. In fact, a study done in the UK surveyed over 1500 women and found that a whopping 52% of them had experienced unwanted sexual behaviors while in the workplace, and up to 20% of them had experienced unwanted behavior from a manager or someone in an authority position. Furthermore, out of all of the women surveyed 80% of women did not report it for fear that it might have a negative impact on their career and work relationships. It is very clear that this is an issue this committee must work diligently towards solving, though there will be many hurdles ahead.
    Currently, the UK government has not necessarily eradicated this issue, though various groups around the country are actively fighting for more protection for sexual harassment victims. That being said, the Equality Act of 2010 has been a great step in the fight against workplace sexual harassment. This Act defines what sexual harassment is- any form of unwanted conduct of sexual nature with the purpose of violating an individual’s dignity or making the workplace hostile, offensive, or uncomfortable. This act also prohibits three types of harassment: unwanted sexual advancements, jokes or derogatory comments, and less favorable treatment due to rejection of advancements. The Equality Act has been a good start towards improving this issue, and the next legislative step for the UK is to introduce laws that would make it a legal obligation for employers to protect their workers from harassment and victimization in the workplace. The UK also would like to work on changing people’s attitude towards this issue and creating a greater understanding of workplace sexual harassment among citizens in the future.
    In this committee, the UK is looking to improve legislation around the world in regards to workplace sexual harassment, like they have done with The Equality Act. Many countries have yet to make any move towards new laws, and while these laws do not change everything and do not necessarily stop workplace harassment in its tracks, they are an important groundwork and basis for preventing these issues. If the law is there to remind people that what they are doing is wrong, they may rethink their actions. Secondly, the UK would like to see citizens better educated on what sexual harassment is and what its impacts can be. So many people, most of them male, do not understand what an issue sexual harassment truly is and they do not understand how actions seemingly insignificant have the ability to unintentionally encourage harassment. In order to solve this issue the UN women committee must work towards changing cultural norms, like victim-blaming and a lack of emphasis on taking responsibility of potentially harmful actions, legislation is just not enough at this time.

  • avatar image
    James Hatfield November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Japan
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Vicksburg Highschool
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Delegate: James Hatfield

    Japan as a respective country towards females, knows that this is a serious issue that Japan takes seriously and is working to give women a voice, confidence in there government, and faith that they will be heard. Our main focus is to hear how other countries handle this situation and find productive ways to make the women in Japan and abroad feel confident in their voice and to reassure that they will be heard. Japan is familiar with the #MeToo movement and has seen it been used quite often lately, Japan would like to use that same movement to expand this pressing issue abroad and get more women the help they deserve. The country of Japan believes that we will have the support of the following United Nation countries. United Sates of America, the UK, Canada, France, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Finland, Germany, and many more. All these nations are very close and have made it their priority to give women a voice. Japan is committed to giving Women the equal rights they deserve, and the voice to be heard. Together we can stop sexual harassment and give women the voice, respect, and freedom they deserve.

  • Mariapacifco
    Mariapacifco November 14, 2018 Reply

    November 13th, 2018
    Country: India
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Sexual harassment is defined in the United Nations Secretary-General’s bulletin (ST/SGB/2008/5) as, “any unwelcome conduct that might reasonably be expected or be perceived to cause offence or humiliation to another person…[and] may take the from of words, gestures… or which create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.” Sexual harassment has both social and ultimately economic effects onto a nation. India has the second largest workforce in the world, which mostly consists of agricultural and technological fields. Although India’s economy overall has raised for the last decade, the amount of discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplaces towards women has ultimately caused a barrier for India’s economy to grow even more.
    Sexual harassment is a form of violence against women. This topic itself is separate from the huge topic of violence against women this committee is also debating because how much it hinders economic growth. We have to make sure in our resolution that women are able to trust the police, or any authority figure, to report any signs of sexual harassment. Without this first step, we will never be able to find the criminals or teach the rest of the world the consequences there are when they sexually harass a woman. India firmly believes in the four P’s: Protection of human rights, prosecution of offenders, prevention of violence, and provision of services to survivors. These may help our committee frame our resolution and drive more questions such as: What is the punishment for those who sexually harass women? Should it be different depending on their position? Or workplace? How do we tackle this issue in rural areas where there may be no corporation to report it to? How do we reduce the amount of sexual harassment in the workplace for the future? How do we help the victims?
    In India, we have passed The Sexual Harassment of Women at Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition, and Redressal) Act of 2013. It claims that all women have the right to work in a safe environment, free from sexual harassment. The workplace extends to all government and private entities, including to a “dwelling place or a house” that is involved in economic activity. This act allows women to send in their complaint and for the next three months, the company must investigate. If in the end the affected women are unsatisfied with the investigation, they may approach the courts or repeat it to the police. Each state is required to set up a Local Complaints Committee (LCC) to further investigate employees when there are less than 10 women making similar claims, as there would be less evidence.
    As the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action of 1995 states, “The fear of violence, including harassment, is a permanent constraint on the mobility of women and limits their access to resources and basic activities.” We as a committee must find solutions that lead to a decline of sexual harassment in the workplace to help our economies flourish and continue to end violence against women. The country of India would like to further exclaim their excitement to work with other nations to come up with a successful resolution.

  • Jase727
    Jase727 November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual harassment
    Poland
    Jase Apol
    With the evolving #MeToo movement it is clear of the malicious nature of workplace harassment involving both genders. Women, however tend to be the primary target of activities approximating at about 81% of women admitting that they have been at the center of this harassment while only 43% of men experience this as well. This harassment may come from the feeling of empowerment when considered with this subject; however, these types of activities can be associated with the different cultures surrounding this activity. Countries with this “harassment culture” tend to correlate with high rape rate and lower right’s for women within the given country. The world is changing and will not accept this culture anymore making the need for change regarding right’s in the workplace much more evident. The changing job market is also subject to this culture. The computer engineering, and programming industry has one of the highest harassment rates due to the male dominated industry.

    Sexual harassment is not a criminal offense, but can be prosecuted under the Articles 198 and 199 of the criminal code. Sexual Harassment in the workplace in also covered in article 18 of the Labour Code prohibiting discrimination of a sexual nature based on sex. With these rules in place we believe that the proper conduct is in place to control the rates of harassment in Poland. We believe this is a basis by basis issue and should be covered by individual countries focusing on their own workplace and looking for solution from there on. We have already fixed the problems of harassment within our own country and disagree with further regulations that have been tried to press by the UN as we have seen success with our own policies.

  • Layah_Fedrizzi
    Layah_Fedrizzi November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Belgium
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Workplace sexual harassment
    Delegate: Layah Fedrizzi

    As a member of the UN Women, it is our duty to promote sustainable development internationally. Sexual harassment is an enormous issue worldwide, especially in the workplace, and it is our responsibility to help solve this problem. Around 3 out of 4 women are being, or have been sexually harassed at work. This type of harassment includes unwelcome sexual advances, obscene remarks, and any other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. The problem partly comes from the cultural feelings of privilege and discrimination that are deeply related to gender inequality in our society. The problem has proven a challenge to solve, due to lack of victims speaking up about their case. Generally, this is because victims fear the consequences to their career if they step forward to address their perpetrators. Sexual harassment is definitely not a new issue, but one that is only recently being brought to people’s attention, although it is experienced by women all around the world everyday.
    Belgium is a western European country that is seen as one of the safest or most peaceful countries in the world. Despite this, sexual harassment is still a huge problem faced by most women in Belgium. Since April of 2014, sexual harassment and catcalling have been illegal in Belgium after a documentary was made about the subject in 2012 by a student. The law specifically states that to sexually harass or intimidate a person based on gender is illegal. A fine or up to one year in prison is punishment for violation of the law. This law, very importantly, displayed the right for women to feel safe in public spaces. Broadly, the #MeToo movement has brought sexual harassment to the attention of many people around the world. Belgium citizens have had interactions with the movement and will most likely continue to in the future. Belgium, although having taken huge strides towards solving the problem, and being widely seen as a safe country, is a victim to sexism and sexual harassment like so many places around the globe.
    As a member of the UN and ECOSOC, we would like to come to a resolution that will benefit as many countries as possible regarding the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace. Although the issue has been widely addressed, Belgium does not have many plans for the future of sexual harassment in the workplace, but there are many ideas of what could be done for the future. For example, Belgium could start taking complaints more seriously. The law states that sexual harassment will not be tolerated, yet despite multiple complaints being made, only a few of them were justified. Companies could be taking measures to prevent sexual harassment based on the paramountcy of the event, such as setting up places for victims to call to state their issue. Other internal procedures could include, enabling employees who have been sexually harassed to contact a trusted person, and/or counselor, separate from the company. A counselor that will not reveal or use private information against the victim are vital to building trust among employees, and therefore being able to accurately present just how many women are affected by this issue. Belgium is not high on the list of countries that experience this kind of violence, but still falls victim to it, and would like to help resolve the problem efficiently.

  • HeNNaH
    HeNNaH November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Greece
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Sexual harassment in the workplace
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy
    Delegate: Henna Haque

    Sexual harassment is defined as any undesirable verbal, non-verbal or physical behavior of a sexual nature that affects the sexual dignity of the individual. Sexual harassment in the workplace, where people spend most of their day’s hours, can be among colleagues, by an employer to an employee and vice versa or by a superior to an inferior and vice versa. It is even observed during the job search process and not only in the context of an existing employment relationship. Sexual harassment has obvious detrimental effects on a persons’ health, whether male or female being harassed, including high blood pressure, heart disease, anxiety disorder, and PTSD. In Greece, continued sexual assault in the work force has led to some people quitting their jobs and committing suicide in some major cases. The idea that countries accept the fact that sexual harassment is okay is absolutely ridiculous. Sexual harassment in the workforce is absolutely disgusting and is considered a criminal offense. In Greece, the most common cases of sexual harassment are between an employee and an employer, with the employee being the victim in most cases.

    In Greece, sexual harassment falls within the scope of both civil and penal law and is absolutely not tolerated. According to article 3 of Law 3896/2010, sexual harassment is sex discrimination, which is prohibited. Also, article 337 of the Penal Code expressly defines sexual abuse as a crime, whereas paragraph 6 of the same article states anyone who is sexually harassing by exploiting the work position of the victim shall be liable to imprisonment of up to three years and a pecuniary penalty of at least 1,000 euros. In Greece, both the employee and the employer reserve the right to file a complaint to the governmental officials, depending on who is being sexually abused or harassed. However, if they are attacked or harassed, it is the responsibility of the person being harassed to file an immediate complaint. Greek officials are mainly the ones who take care of people being harassed, and take necessary measures to ensure that sexual harassment never happens again in the work force.

    Since Greece has taken multiple steps to provide justice for anyone who is sexually assaulted or harassed in the work force, Greece would like to listen to what other countries have to say about this issue. Greece will support other countries who have similar ideas and will be more than willing to work on possible resolution papers with our allies.

  • GrunIsa
    GrunIsa November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Country: Egypt
    Delegate: Isabella Grunwaldt

    In the last year or two, the trend of the #MeToo movement has influenced many women around the globe to come out with their stories and to hold their oppressors accountable for their actions. As many as 80% of women around the world are sexually harassed in the workplace. In the past, Egypt has not had many policies in place to protect women in the workplace. Egypt understands that it has met accusations of sexual harassment with silence, and hasty decision making by the courts. Egypt is still working on combating this silence, as it is a highly uncomfortable topic to begin with, and should be treated with careful precision.
    Egypt knows that mainly women are the ones harassed in cases of sexual harassment in the workplace, but Egypt doesn’t have a working system in place to prevent this treatment. A study done in 2013 shows that 99% of women in Egypt are subjected to harassment. When interviewed, 70% of women from Cairo said they were sexually harassed at work (Ezzat). Egypt acknowledges that this number is probably lower than the truth as the culture of silence pervades Egypts society. Many women who do report sexual harassment are often at the mercy of their attackers, their bosses, and coworkers. In some cases, the women who report sexual harassment end up in prison (Raghavan), which Egypt understands is not the right answer.
    Egypt acknowledges all of this and that the rest of the world seems to be moving toward reform in this area, but Egypt would move to keep Egypt out of any severe changes. Egypt doesn’t want to do any radical change making because Egypt wants to not inspire any more powerful societal divisions. Egypt would like to instead add more educational opportunities in schools and workplaces to try and change this cultural bias of silence. Egypt will not interfere with other countries if they promote surpluses of changes, but Egypt asks to stay out of it.
    Egypt can see the desire for change and the progress being made towards this social reform, but Egypt can not partake in the extreme changes other countries might want to take part in. Egypt will not support such changes as more laws protecting women from being unjustly thrown in prison when holding perpetrators accountable, as this could inspire uprisings two much for the country to handle at the moment.

    Works Cited

    Ezzat, Mona. “Egypt: Sexual harassment, a silent stalker at the workplace.” Al Bawaba, 29 Sept. 2015, http://www.albawaba.com/business/egypt-sexual-harassment-silent-stalker-workplace-748642. Accessed 12 Nov. 2018.
    Raghavan, Sudarsan, and Heba F. Mahfouz. “In Egypt, a #MeToo complaint can land a woman in jail.” Washington Post, 25 Oct. 2018, http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/in-egypt-a-metoo-complaint-can-land-a-woman-in-jail/2018/10/24/3a2fe5a0-d6db-11e8-a10f-b51546b10756_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.dd14b63ad693. Accessed 12 Nov. 2018.

  • Rachel_Dick
    Rachel_Dick November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Rwanda
    Vicksburg High School
    Rachel Dick

    In recent years, sexual harassment has risen to attention as a key issue faced by women in the workplace. Victims fear speaking out against such harassment in fear of termination or other consequences to their career. As talk around this issue grows, the need for action grows with it. Many women in multiple parts of the globe and multiple professions report such harassment in its many different forms. It is recognized that sexual harassment can have drastic, harmful effect on the mental and physical health of its victims. While Rwanda acknowledges there is much to improve upon, it stands as a champion for gender equality for both Africa and much of the world.
    Rwanda is proud to have a strong presence of women in the workforce, being the first nation in the world with more than 50% of parliament composed of women.

    Article 12 of Rwanda’s Labour Code, in correspondence with Article 11 of the Rwandan constitution, prohibits discrimination on the basis of origin, sex, colour, race, marital status, and other factors. In 2003, the International Labor Organization concluded sexual harassment to be a form of sex discrimination, a decision Rwanda recognizes and is in accordance with. With this, Rwanda recognizes that both men and women can be victims of sexual harassment. Additionally, Law N°59/2008 of 10/09/18 seeks to prevent and punish gender-based violence in Rwanda. Rwanda stresses the importance that sexual harassment does not only harm its immediate victims, but also a workplace, an economy, and a nation, as a whole. Protecting citizens from sexual harassment is in the best interest of a nation, thus it is of great importance that victims be encouraged to speak out.

    Rwanda believes the public must be better educated on sexual harassment. This includes education on what sexual harassment is, what it’s warning signs look like, the widespread damages sexual harassment can bring to a workplace, and how a victim of sexual harassment can seek help. Furthermore, Rwanda stresses the importance of erasing stigma around sexual harassment and creating an environment in which victims feel safe to come forward. Rwanda looks forward to meeting with other nations to combat this issue.

  • Oliviaggriffin
    Oliviaggriffin November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Sweden
    Olivia Griffin

    Sexual harassment in the workplace is a global epidemic for all women, that must be solved by creating a healthy environment for women to come forward and address their perpetrators without fear of backlash from their communities. Between 87-94% of employees who experience sexual harassment do not file a complaint against it, so the UN hopes to catalyze further actions into the protection of women from sexual harassment in the workplace by advancing harassment prevention through ILO,UNICEF, and UNDP (“Sexual Harassment Statistics”). However, there will remain a strong need for further action regarding this issue, if each country does not acknowledge that sexual harassment is a worldwide epidemic that threatens the mental and physical health of many women. The goal of Sweden is to progress actions in sexual harassment prevention by educating its people and creating policies that support women worldwide in their mission to create a safe workplace environment.

    The country of Sweden has taken numerous precautions to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, however the country still has ever increasing rates of workplace harassment (“Rates of Sexual Harassment in Europe”). Some precautions that Sweden has taken would include creating the country’s first Equal Opportunities Act of 1980 which made “gender discrimination in the workplace” illegal (“Sweden and Gender Equality”). As well as creating The Swedish Discrimination Act which “demands that employers… actively promote equality between men and women… [and] take measures against harassment” (“Sweden and Gender Equality”). Considering that 48% of the Swedish workforce is made up of women, it is vital that the Swedish government upholds the rights of their feminine workforce (“Women in the Workplace”). Despite the creation of these acts, the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention has released data proving that in 2016 “5.5% of persons state[d] that they were victims of harassment” in the workplace, most of whom were women between the ages of 16-19 (“Swedish Crime Survey”).

    Currently, Sweden adheres to the UN’s Zero Tolerance Policy on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse. However, Sweden has recently stated that they believe “we must be prepared to replace military units or formed police units when appropriate steps to investigate allegations have not been undertaken” (“Statement by Sweden”). Thus, the ultimate goal of Sweden is to decrease sexual harassment rates within our country and facilitate a safe working environment for all women. In order to do so, Sweden has proposed the immediate removal of any official who fails to adhere to a strict no harassment policy.

    Sweden believes that it is essential to the advancement of democracy that women across the country feel safe and respected while at work. In order to facilitate this, Sweden suggests that all of its workers participate in annual sexual harassment training in order to increase awareness about the epidemic. Sweden also believes that every workplace should obtain a specific policy that defines sexual harassment, and lists the just punishments for such reprehensible actions. Overall, Sweden desires a legal system that enables victims to come forward with their claims without it affecting their safety or career, as well as a government that creates laws requiring that all accusations brought forth be investigated and taken seriously.

    Works Cited
    “5 Disturbing Sexual Harassment Statistics We Can’t Afford to Ignore.” Jobs and Company Reviews for Women, fairygodboss.com/articles/sexual-harassment-statistics.
    Hardeep Matharu @Hardeep_Matharu. “The Sexual Harassment Capitals of Europe.” The Independent, Independent Digital News and Media, 16 Mar. 2017, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/sweden-and-denmark-have-highest-number-of-sexual-assaults-in-europe-a6800901.html.
    “Statement by Sweden at the Security Council Briefing on UN Peacekeeping Operations – Strategic Force Generation.” Regeringskansliet, http://www.government.se/statements/2017/10/security-council-briefing-un-peacekeeping-operations–strategic-force-generation/.
    “Sweden and Gender Equality.” Sweden.se, 20 Aug. 2018, sweden.se/society/sweden-gender-equality/.
    “Swedish Crime Survey.” Brottsförebyggande Rådet, http://www.bra.se/bra-in-english/home/crime-and-statistics/swedish-crime-survey.html.
    “What About Women in the Workplace in Scandinavia?” Scandinavia Standard, 29 Apr. 2018, http://www.scandinaviastandard.com/what-about-women-in-the-workplace-in-scandinavia/.

  • Brookeorlando
    Brookeorlando November 14, 2018 Reply

    November 6th, 2018
    SUBMITTED TO: WOMEN
    FROM: Vietnam
    SUBJECT: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Vietnam believes that we should get a long-term plan to eradicate sexual harassment against women in the workplace. We need to take baby steps to eliminate it so the change isn’t as drastic the people. There hasn’t been equal pay among genders in the workplace in a very long time. This tradition has been passed down from generation to generation, and it’s difficult to change centuries worth of views immediately.
    We will need a whole separate strategy to end sexual harassment. We could potentially offer an incentive for women to report sexual harassment, so we can arrest the harassers to prevent future harassment from the same people. We could also start posting media and how much sexual harassment affects people, to try to take these potential harassers and try to change their minds on harassing people.
    While it’s basically impossible to end all sexual harassment, the ultimate goal is to eliminate it as much as possible. However, if we continue the plan for equal pay, we can hopefully enforce laws in the future. When equal pay is more accepted in the community, it will affect people with these views less. Overall, there may never be a permanent solution for these issues, but we can reduce and prevent them more than you think. If we go slow and take our time to enforce these, it may be more effective. These are traditions we are changing, not laws.

  • Emilykgoff
    Emilykgoff November 14, 2018 Reply

    Emily Goff
    Peru
    UN Women
    City High Middle

    Sexual harassment in the workplace has the ability to affect any women in any country all around the world. Peru recognizes this is a major issue and that major steps need to be taken to prevent any and all forms of sexual harassment. Women have the right to work and not feel afraid of what their colleagues or bosses may do to them. Sexual harassment has many negative long term mental health effects outside of the work environment that carry into the day to day lives of women. This leads women to be afraid to speak out about it, or from fear that they will be fired or judged in the community.
    Peru is already committed to regulations to end sexual harassment and sexual violence against women. Peru already has laws in place to combat this like law No. 27942 on Prevention and Punishment of Sexual Harassment. Peru will advocate for clear definitions of sexual harassment and fitting punishments for offenders. Peru would also advocate for outreach programs to encourage women to come forward with their experiences. This includes working with non-government organizations (NGOs) in order to provide community outreach for areas heavily affected by sexual harassment.

  • Morganr730
    Morganr730 November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Czech Republic
    Morgan Russell

    Workplace sexual harassment is a crucial issue in both the Czech Republic and the world. An alarming study revealed that 25% of women experience sexual harassment in the workplace, and 75% of harassment victims experienced some type of retaliation. This has led to a multitude of issues including a decrease in the overall performance of a person’s job in the workplace and creates an intimidating and hostile work environment. In 2018, the United Nations Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres, and other UN leaders vowed to help crush workplace sexual violence. This is important to discuss because of the atrocious acts both men and women have been undergoing at work. Our country advocates for global awareness, mutual respect between coworkers, and prevention for any sexual brutality within a corporation. We are striving towards peace and healthy relationships so that this issue can be resolved. In order for countries to effectively create this change, the United Nations must express what measures need to be taken in order to help this growing issue.

    As a country that has experienced an immense amount of harassment in the violence, Czech Republic fully understands the negative effects that this can have not only from a business perspective, but a person’s overall well-being. Our country reports that 45% of Czech women had been sexually harassed, and many of them repeatedly. The Czech Republic does not condone this behavior, and urges the United Nations to help relieve this issue. To combat this critical problem we have taken a number of steps. Under the U.S. Department of State 2010 Human Rights Report: Czech Republic, all forms of sexual harassment are forbidden. We are also helping this internationally. We are apart of V-Day, a global movement to end violence and abuse against women in the workplace, to help raise awareness for this pressing issue. We are amongst one of the other 200 countries to participate in this. We are looking for ways to enforce this more effectively, but we lack the funds. We also have a labor code. The Labor Code considers sexual harassment as a form of discrimination. Any form of discrimination in labor relations is prohibited. The terms, such as harassment, sexual harassment and persecution, are further better outlined, described, and regulated in the Anti-Discrimination Act. Certain forms of sexual harassment or sexual assault are prohibited by the Penal Code. We punish perpetrators through fines and even possible jail times.

    Czech Republic recommends that the United Nations strongly urges countries to help put an end to sexual harassment in the workplace through enforced legislation, campaigns, and any other means necessary so that we can move closer towards a safe work environment. We would like to see the number of cruel acts targeted towards workers. We advocate for countries to all work towards this goal unless they are physically unable to due to a war or other extreme cases. Czech Republic would also like to see developed countries support this fight financially to help make it possible for everyone, regardless of their financial situation. A resolution that condemns harassment in the workplace will help promote human rights and keep the world and workplace safer.

  • Cdavidson
    Cdavidson November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    France
    Colin Davidson

    Sexual harassment in the workplace has existed for as long as women have worked and continues to endure even today. Sexual harassment can take many forms including verbal harassment, physical harassment, and cyber-harassment. Surveys have found that 81% of women experience some form of sexual harassment in the workplace. What’s worse is that 80% of women who experience harassment never file a complaint. This is due to fear of retaliation. These numbers are too high to ignore. Sexual harassment can lead to stress, anxiety, and depression. Women should be encouraged at work not put down. Limiting sexual harassment would lead to much more productivity in the workplace because women would feel more comfortable and more confident. This is an issue no country can ignore. Unfortunately, looking down on women has existed in human cultures for many years. Since it was preached for so long, it isn’t easy to eliminate. This is a problem no country can ignore. Every nation sees sexual harassment, France included. We must work to eliminate this dreadful aspect of our workplace.

    As a leader of the Western world and the EU, France looks to set a good example for others to follow. France ranks 9th in the world in the Gender Inequality Index and 16th in the Global Gender Gap Index. This is up from being ranked 45th the year before. French lawmakers recently passed a law which fines people for sexual harassment anywhere. This law had was first used when a man was fined 300 euros or $350 for verbal sexual harassment on bus. These are the steps that need to be made to reduce sexual harassment in the workplace. All countries must take this matter seriously. We have made steps to make women more comfortable in the workplace, but harassment still exists in FRance and in other countries, France supports reform for the rights of women in the workplace. We demonstrated that when we supported the formation of this very committee.

    Recognizing the severity of the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace, France believes certain steps should be made to increase comfort and confidence for women in the workplace. Cracking down on the transgressors of harassment isn’t enough. The very culture of many of our societies must change. Of course, we should instill harsher punishment for sexual harassment. In France we instituted fines for anyone committing sexual harassment. Perhaps this is too light a punishment. This line is open for debate. Many women are afraid to talk about their experiences of sexual harassment in fear of retaliation by the company. We should create an anonymous tip bank within our governments to make speaking out easier. Many companies fear lawsuits and reputation tarnishing from sexual harassment cases. Perhaps maybe we should make punishments harsher on the individual perpetrators but less severe on the companies themselves to encourage disclosure of information. Whatever it is something must be done.

  • Brandontp152
    Brandontp152 November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
    Afghanistan
    Brandon Pham

    The ill-treatment of women in the workplace has finally been exposed; albeit, it has been an arduous and frustrating journey. The #thatsharassment movement provided support and information to victims of sexual harassment, empowered bystanders to speak out, and equipped employers with tools to create safe work environments. The “Truth Has A Voice” ad followed the high-profile coverage of Harvey Weinstein and his alleged abuse, shined a spotlight on the pervasive silencing of victims of sexual violence, and provided a visual representation of victims’ silence being broken. The TIME’S UP not only aims to raise awareness of sexual harassment across industries, but also to provide the tools to systematically eliminate it by “improving laws, employment agreements, and corporate policies.” The #metoo movement has drawn attention to the issue of sexual harassment faced by women in countries around the world. As a race, we have united to end the ill-treatment of abuse of women across the globe; however, the problem is still prevalent and has proven to be a systemic issue.

    In Afghanistan, we have an ill reputation regarding our treatment of women. This is one of the most blasphemous and untrue accusations of all time. The profane actions of the Taliban and the Mujahideen have brought shame and embarrassment upon the glorious country of Afghanistan; however, their actions do not speak for the rest of the country. Since their destruction in the 21st century, a new government under Hamid Karzai was formed by the United Nations, which includes women’s rights similar to the reign of Amanullah. The United Nations Population Fund of Afghanistan (UNFPA) has led the Afghani population through numerous strides and progressive breakthroughs. Only one year after their establishment, around 1,430 women and girls had the opportunity to discreetly report violence, receive care and be referred to further services through six Family Protection Centres located in health care facilities in Kabul, Nangarhar, Herat, Balkh, Bamiyan and Baghlan. Over 2,500 police recruits have been trained using a manual provided by UNFPA which briefs police officers on eliminating violence against women. In 17 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, UNFPA has supported the establishment of prevention and response services to support survivors of gender-based violence. Moreover, they are in support of establishing a long term judicial system. UNFPA trained 875 judges and prosecutors from 17 provinces, as well as 850 health staff in six provinces, on responding to gender-based violence.

    A holistic approach is needed to combat gender-based violence, one that brings together the sectors and duty-bearers whose understanding and action can influence how survivors are assisted. Religious leaders and communities must be sensitized to the substantial body of evidence that shows how Islam rigorously disapproves of gender-based violence. Health care staff must be aware of referral mechanisms and trained to provide the specialized psychosocial care that survivors need. And the police, as the first point of contact for reporting gender-based violence, must be sensitized to their duty to survivors, and to the need to act on complaints ethically, proactively, and with kindness. This is UN Women’s opportunity to finally assist the Middle East and to help us demonstrate to the world that Islam is truly a religion of peace.

  • AnjaMPeters
    AnjaMPeters November 14, 2018 Reply

    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Syria
    SUBJECT: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    DELEGATE: Anja Peters

    Sexual harassment in the workplace is an infelicitous and monstrous issue that every country should be workings towards to remedy. Sexual harassment in the workplace is defined as “any unwelcome sexual advance, request for sexual favour, verbal or physical conduct or gesture of a sexual nature, or any other behaviour of a sexual nature (including pornography, sexually-colored remarks) that has or that might reasonably be expected or be perceived to cause offense or humiliation to another,” according to the UN. Worldwide, 75% of women have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace and 35% have experienced sexual and/or physical violence. Sexual harassment could create a hostile work environment and interrupt the productivity and quality of the work being done. Syria is no exception to these horrors, and we want to see a change.

    Under article 45 of the Syrian constitution it states, “The state guarantees women all the opportunities that enable them to participate fully and effectively in political, social, cultural, and economic life. The state works to remove the restrictions that prevent women’s development and their participation in building socialist Arab society.” Just before the war broke out in 2011, only 22% of the workforce were made up of women. Since then, women have taken on more of the roles traditionally set solely for the men. More women are making decisions and becoming financial contributors to their households. We want our women to be safe when they are in the workplace, because a safe workplace means our people are being taken care of number one, and number two they are then able to focus at their tasks at hand and fulfil those responsibilities without worrying about their safety.

    Syria wishes to, as a first step, begin educating people in the workplace about sexual harassment and what that means, possibly by implementing educational programs to get the message heard. Not only does there need to be programs in place eduacating workers on what sexaul harassment is, but there also needs to be in place protocols on how to handle it as well. We also want to put into place quick and effective ways for women to report sexual harassment in the workplace, and encourage women to speak out against any harassment that may be happening/had happened to them. We believe these changes are crucial in order to help women feel safer and more valued in the workforce, especially since women are such an integral part of life itself- we should be working towards respecting them more than how society currently does.

  • Niaodemays
    Niaodemays November 14, 2018 Reply

    Parallel wit
    H the still growing, still strengthening international #MeTo movement, South Korea is beginning the transition to safer society based on foundations of gender equity, rather than those other patriarchal one. In 1995, seven out of 10 women could say they have been sexually harassed, or salted, or raped. Over the years, the numbers jumped to 9 out of 10. With the creation of websites which perpetuated these crimes and the sale of “rape“ drugs, and national on the rest has surfaced.

    Since 2016, many women have reported feeling more equally treatead, safe, and appreciate it since the implementation of laws like the EEO. With this, South Korea is willing to implement more laws to protect women. South Korea recommends this is down slowly and with caution, simultaneously however, diligently and rapidly.

    • Niaodemays
      Niaodemays November 14, 2018 Reply

      Whoops this is the wrong version of this. It doesn’t really make any sense. Please ignore

  • MoeOmran
    MoeOmran November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    United States of America
    Abigail Zhang, Forest Hills Northern
    Due to threats towards careers, promotions, and possible punishments, victims of sexual assault in the workplace have a difficult time taking legal action against their perpetrators, considering that their employment is in their hands. These unwelcome acts of verbal, visual, and physical harassment appear commonly in workplaces around the world and are often hard to validate due to lack of evidence. However, many policies on harassment and abuse of power already exist to define sexual harassment in the workplace and abate further occurrences of assault. Although verdicts of Supreme Court cases have enforced the United States law on workplace sexual harassment, over 80% of employed women have suffered through some type of sexual harassment while working.
    The law of the United States recognizes two types of workplace sexual harassment: quid pro quo harassment and hostile work environment harassment. The former occurs when an employee tolerates sexual harassment to keep their job, receive a tangible benefit, or avoid punishment, and the latter occurs when persistent sexual behavior unreasonably interferes with an employee’s ability to work. Both types have been challenged in various Supreme Court cases and defended with title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This section prohibits employment discrimination based on sex and states that employers are responsible for actionable discrimination caused by a supervisor. The United States also enacted the Civil Rights Act of 1991, allowing women to sue and collect compensation for damages caused by sexual discrimination or harassment. Furthermore, the United States has signed the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and in the future may consider ratification.
    Regarding solutions for this ever-present issue of harassment in the workplace, the United States will continue to support all resolutions that take preventative measures against sexual harassment in the workplace. Any efforts that make resolutions more specific towards the protection of women and women only will be favored. Women are an integral part of the society and the economy of the United States and must be protected; if women have better protection while at work, the economies of countries all over the world will thrive.

  • Taylorpotter
    Taylorpotter November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Mexico
    Taylor Potter

    As workplace sexual harassment has stepped into the limelight, thanks to recent campaigns such as the #metoo and #yesallwomen movements, there has never been a better time to try and fix the issue at hand. Although workplace sexual harassment has been a problem for a long time, the recent movements have displayed how deep-rooted the issue really goes. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commision (EEOC) estimates that 25 percent of women experience sexual harassment in the workplace; furthermore, 75 percent of harassment victims encounter retaliation when they report their harassment. Sexual harassment is an act of power in the workplace which is why it makes it a difficult issue to tackle. Not only does workplace sexual assault victims have more hospital visits and lower self- esteem, but workplace sexual assault can lead to serious global consequences. Absenteeism, reduced job satisfaction and productivity, premature retirement, higher rates of staff turnover and insurance costs, legal defense, and liability for sexual harassment claims are just some of the effects workplace sexual harassment can have on the employer. The United Nations needs to decide what measures need to be taken to stop sexual harassment in the workplace while taking into account the different work environments, assault types, and countries policies.

    The #metoo movevment made a lasting effect on Mexico. Mexican Actresses Karla Souza and Paola Núñez came forward and shared their stories of abuse. Núñez thanked the #metoo movement for, “letting us share our stories to start a movement that generates changes in this country.” Mexico does not take workplace sexual harassment lightly and has recently passed legislation to try and put an end to it. Former President Felipe Calderon passed an amendment to Articles 47 and 51 of the Mexican Federal Labor Law (FLL) to include sexual harassment as grounds for termination with cause. Mexico has also ratified many treaties involving the equal treatment of women including “ United Nations Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)” and “Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence against Women.” Mexico’s president Enrique Peña Nieto has also taken a very active role in condemning sexual harassment and violence against women. He and the government are focusing on three central tasks to end the harassment. Firstly, “Eliminating male chauvinism in all its expressions.” Next “supporting women through various actions by Federal Government agencies, to ensure their economic empowerment and enabling them to be independent,” and finally by, “ promoting respect between men and women.” As a committee, we need to promote legislation that puts sanctions on employers to protect employees.

    Mexico proposes that the United Nations Women council proposes resolutions that urge countries to pass legislation that prioritizes training on how to preventing sexual harassment and gives workplace sexual assault victims ways to come forward and resources to help. The UN needs to put a stop to workplace sexual harassment by defining it further, and urging countries to create legislation and guidelines that help prevent it. Mexico would also like to see the UN try to piggy-back off the success of the #metoo movement and spread it, and more campaigns like it, to other countries around the world. A resolution that condones violence in the workplace and puts measures to prevent it, and provides resources to victims will help to end workplace sexual harassment.

  • Graceackerman
    Graceackerman November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
    Canada
    Grace Ackerman

    Although women’s rights have come a long way, gender discrimination and assault against women are still universal issues. At least one in four women have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace, and only 6-14% report it; even then the women courageous enough to report it have a three in four chance of experiencing retaliation, whether it be reaching a stall in one’s career or being fired. The #MeToo movement has brought global attention to the kinds of behavior that women are forced to deal with in the workplace; this movement has spurred education and a greater awareness of the exorbitant prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace. The United Nations’ Chief Executive Board held a meeting in May of 2018 to address this recurrent issue; they recognize that this issue derives from a discriminatory culture entrenched in gender inequality, and they pledge to encourage action through reporting, investigation, and decision-making. Additionally, from 30 to 31 July in New York Feminists, gender experts and UN officials came together to discuss promising practices to curb sexual harassment and assault in a UN Women-organized “Feminist Think Space”. The combination of efforts from the UN Chief Executive Board Task Force and recommendations stemming from the Feminist Think Space they hoped to create a joint UN policy to address sexual harassment by the fall of 2018. Similar to the United Nations, the nation of Canada is a champion of human rights and, in turn, women’s rights.

    Canada is a world leader in the promotion and protection of women’s rights and gender equality; these issues are central to Canada’s foreign and domestic policies. Therefore Canada is concerned with eliminating violence against women. The issue of violence against women is prevalent in Canada, for half of all Canadian women have experienced at least one incident of physical or sexual violence since the age of 16, and over 90 per cent of Canadian women have admitted that they had experienced sexual harassment at some point during their working lives. The Government of Canada is taking action to ensure that federal workplaces are free from harassment and sexual violence. The government asked all Canadians to respond to an online survey and held a series of roundtable meetings and teleconferences with stakeholders: labor organizations, employer organizations, federal government departments and agencies, academics, and advocacy groups. This study emphasized the importance of reporting, recording, supporting, and addressing the issue; the Canadian government is placing a greater importance on these actions. As a member of the committee of United Nations Women, Canada was one of the first countries to ratify CEDAW, which set international standards for eliminating gender discrimination, and in 2002 Canada ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (this was adopted by the United Nations in 2000). Also, Canada was instrumental in ensuring sexual and gender-based crimes were included in the draft Statute for the International Criminal Court. In addition Canada has made many international efforts such as organizing a discussion that aimed to open dialogue concerning the development of women’s rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, working in Cameroon to enforce the protection of widows and orphans, and promoting women’s rights across Guatemala, El Salvador, and Costa Rica. Organizations that Canada supports include Canadian Women’s Foundation, Oxfam, and the National Council of Women of Canada.

    Sexual harassment in the workplace is still the scourge of the Canadian workforce, and it can be detrimental to the mental and physical health of a women as well her career. Canada suggests that we create a comprehensive, integrated strategy to prevent and respond to sexual assault in the workplace. In addition, policies should be initiated that take preventative measures; therefore Canada supports all resolutions that take preventative measures against sexual harassment in the workplace. Furthermore, it is important that governments facilitate an open discussion about these topics and develop specific policies to correct issues that have been a part of workplace culture around the world for far too long.

  • Jbraun2
    Jbraun2 November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    The Republic of the Philippines
    Jimmy Braun

    Section 3 of the Anti-Sexual Harassment Act of 1995 defines workplace sexual harassment as “when a person demands, requests, or requires sexual favors from another person in exchange for another thing such as hiring for employment, re-employment, or continued employment, granting favorable compensation, terms of conditions, promotions, or privileges.” This issue is not a new one. Over the past 40 years, the United Nations and the Philippines has strove to shed light on and eliminate this issue. This form of harassment is difficult to measure, and extends to many different forms including verbal or written, physical, nonverbal or visual. Sexual harassment can affect many aspects of the workplace, oftentimes creating a hostile work environment, and effecting promotions or pay . Because sexual harassment may result in the trade of promotions or pay, these can be used as leverage to cover up harassment.

    In April of 2018, Rodrigo addressed the Philippines efforts to preventing violence against women, saying “The Philippines seeks prosperity for women above all. We will continue to be a pinnacle for the prosperity of women in the workplace.” The Philippines has been a long time pioneer for women’s rights legislation, with bills such as the Republic Act 7877 and the Anti-Violence Against Women Act of 2004, both becoming benchmarks for their time. In 2004, the Philippines Project Offices was opened as a part of the CEDAW Southeast Asia Program, a program founded and funded by the Government of Canada to strengthen government programs within the Philippines, such as putting women in legislative positions and promoting gender equality through the mainstream. The Magna Carta of Women was adopted by the Philippines in 2009, a part of the CEDAW program, and passed as law as The Republic Act 9710, providing a comprehensive law to bolster support for women’s rights in the 21st century.

    According to a study done by U.N. Women, it was found that in the Philippines alone, 30 to 40 percent of women have faced sexual harassment in the workplace. The Philippines stands with the United States, Canada, and the E.U. in their efforts to prevent workplace Sexual Harassment. The burden of sexual harassment should fall on the shoulders of the business owners, promoting the development of Human Resources departments. On a bigger scale, the UN women should continue to use its power to push politicians who aim to address this issue, as they have done in middle eastern countries such as Pakistan, using programs similar to CEDAW. With more attention than ever before, the weight of this issue sits on the shoulders of U.N. Women, and every country present.

  • Spdziuba
    Spdziuba November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Pakistan
    Spencer Dziuba

    Recently, around the world, women have taken an increased role in the corporate workplace. However, in many places, women have not been given equal treatment and protection. Astonishingly, 81% of women have reportedly been sexually harassed in their place of business. This number has continually risen throughout the years reaching an all-time high in 2017. This problem is necessary to address because women should always feel safe in their respective places of work allowing them to freely express and support themselves.

    The Protection against Harassment of Women at Workplace Act was passed in March 2010 for entire Pakistan. It makes sexual harassment of women in the workplace and in public spaces a criminal offense. The objective of this act is to create a safe working environment for women, which is free from harassment, abuse, and intimidation to facilitate their right to work with dignity. It will also enable higher productivity and a better quality of life at work.
    This law is not only restricted to workplaces, but it is also applicable to all public spheres. Various studies have found that social constraints and an aggressive work environment discourage women from seeking employment. To encourage women to join the labor force the government has set a quota for women but often even the minimum quota of 10% remains unfilled. Though women have been working in senior positions and running businesses in the private sector, these have been few in number. However, in recent years, there has been a gradual increase in the number of women working in the government and the private sector despite the obstacles they face.

    In order to protect women in their workplaces, Pakistan suggests that we enforce the laws within the respective countries, and clearly enumerate the offenses against women that are considered to be sexual and hostile (as defined by the UN Women committee). If a country does not comply, they will receive a strongly worded letter and a mark on their permanent record, in addition, they will receive one disadulation. Within a country, we suggest that companies that continue to violate a country’s anti-sexual harassment laws should be placed on a public list in order to be exposed, and only taken off after the government deems it so.

  • Sksb12123
    Sksb12123 November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    The Netherlands

    Hello fellow delegates. Sexual exploitation, abuse, and harassment has plagues organization and industries all over the world for as long as women have worked in male dominated sectors. United Nation supported organizations do not protect their workers to the extent they need to. The occurrences involving the Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) shows that sexual harassment in UN organizations remains an unsolved crippling problem. As our prime minister Mr. Mark Rutte eloquently stated during the general assembly of the 73rd session “This kind of misconduct undermines the core principles of UN.” Today we are here to reaffirm that “Sexual exploitation and abuse and sexual harassment committed by people working for Un missions and organizations is unacceptable. In every case and in every place. No exceptions.”

    The first step towards eradicating sexual harassment from UN si to realize that the problem is complex. It requires the experience of experts and commitment of resources. In the Netherlands we have experienced sexual harassment in our governmental organizations and have implemented effective solutions based on evidence from research studies. These studies have shown that comprehensive policies are required to curb the frequency of sexual harassment in the workplace. These policies should include:

    Establishment of confidential advisors to serve as the contact point where grievances can be directed by the victims. Confidential advisors must be easily approachable through various confidential communication means. “We must make sure that victims feel heard and supported, and that whistle-blowers are protected.”

    Active preventive efforts through education of the workforce. These must consist of in person educational sessions such as roleplaying that are conducted by experienced educators. The supervisors and managers should be active in the education process as well as all other employees.

    Active promotion of women to leadership position. Sexual harassment is a direct result of inequality in distribution of gender between supervisory and entry level jobs. Therefore, to uproot the problem this problem needs to be eliminated.

    To conclude, we propose that there must be an organization that oversees implementing these services into all UN organizations. We propose establishing the UN sexual harassment task force to accomplish the comprehensive policies outlined above across all UN organizations. The Netherlands is committed to the financial support of this task force and we ask other countries such as the United States to join us in the support of these imperative and overdue efforts. Together we can protect the victims and achieve UNs mission “To save and improve lives.”

  • AbbyZoetewey
    AbbyZoetewey November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Saudi Arabia
    Abigail Zoetewey

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia recognizes that in the past, Saudis have been viewed as supporting initiatives against the assistance of women. Saudi Arabia desires to disprove this notion. The Kingdom is moving into this progressive new era. Recently Saudi Arabia has been changing the expectations of what we want from our citizens. Saudi Arabia wishes to both respect our ages old traditions and resolve issues in our community. We wish to destroy instances of harassment in our country because it brings disrespect and dishonor for all those involved.

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is already establishing methods of eradicating these instances. Earlier this year a “Justice For All” law was created to imprison those who commit those horrible acts and fine them to ensure they do not commit these crimes again. The law will protect both genders — with those who report violations promised confidentiality. Under the law, sexual harassment is defined as words or actions that hint at sexuality towards one person from another, or that harms the body, honor or modesty of a person in any way. By doing this we are creating and enforcing laws and principles against this disturbing activity. We also encourage other countries to establish similar regulations.

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia recommends that other countries establish strict measures against these heinous acts with severe punishment for all involved. What we aim to establish to resolve this issue is to provide funding for programs and campaigns against these acts. When a man dishonors a woman who is not his wife he acts against our moral code as a nation. By establishing funding against these issues we create a more principled and respectful world.

  • Matthybels
    Matthybels November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    The Republic of the Philippines
    Matt Hybels

  • Matthybels
    Matthybels November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Bolivia
    Matt Hybels

    The country of Bolivia believes that women are equal to men, and they should be should be treated as such. We have struggled and continue to struggle with discrimination. this is why we believes that work place sexual harassment and assault are important and that they are a good starting spot to help with women’s rights. Bolivia’s constitution says that women are equal to men, but the struggle with women’s rights is a difficult thing. We believe that laws against discrimination and hard punishment is the only way to cut down harassment and assault in the work place. We the country of Bolivia believe that we can do better in the women’s right fight and we are open to suggestions. We hope that the UN women comity will make strides in women’s work place safety.

  • Sydney.levy
    Sydney.levy November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Chile
    Worldwide, 20% of women suffer from some form of sexual harassment. 70% of women worldwide have suffered from some form of spousal abuse or harassment. Although over 154 countries worldwide have laws addressing workplace sexual harassment, respect for and compliance with these laws is often weak. This is an issue that must be addressed and improved by domestic and international action. The Delegation of Chile wishes to work respectfully and cooperatively to resolve the issue of sexual harassment in the workplace.
    In the past year, the #metoo movement has become globally established in an attempt to diminish workplace and street sexual harassment all over the world. Although this is by no means a new issue, the Chief Executives Board in the UK have just recognized sexual harassment and gender inequality as problems. The UN Women’s Committee have an opportunity to create a protocol to address this sensitive topic. Many students and women in the workforce have come together to stand up against sexual harassment. Throughout Chile, the #metoo movement has become very prominent, calling out the inadequate representation of women in politics as well as the creation of sexual harassment protocols in the workplace. There are no laws that criminalize workplace sexual harassment in Chile, although it is a misdemeanor and a plausible cause for immediate dismissal from the place of employment. Punishment for workplace sexual harassment in Chile depends on the employer; however employers face fines and compensations for the victim of workplace sexual harassment. In Santiago in 2005, adopted a law against sexual harassment in the workplace, setting an example for the rest of Chile. A law has been adopted in Santiago as well as Buenos Aires (Argentina’s capital) that requires those who catcall women on the streets to be fined up to $385. As a country looking to develop, Chile is in support of this campaign fighting to end workplace sexual harassment.
    The 17 sustainable goals formed by the UN in 2015 is the world’s best way to create a better future for our people and planet by 2030. The 5th goal targets gender equality. This is relevant to the issue at hand because workplace sexual harassment is a pandemic across Chile. In addition to the 17 sustainable goals, the statement delivered at the 73rd session of the United National General Assembly by H.E. Sebastián Piñera Echeñique, President of the Republic of Chile, stated that “the real development of our counties can be measured by the way we treat our most vulnerable members: children, and women”.
    As a solution to the issue posed, the Delegation of Chile believes the UN should adopt guidelines strongly urging member nations to implement as national policies, specifically to condemn sexual harassment in the workplace. Another possible solution would be for the UN to purpose the formation of an organization that offers support and aid to women and girls suffering from workplace sexual harassment. Lastly, Chile believes that the UN should recommend a policy where offenders of sexual harassment in the workplace are rightfully prosecuted.

    “Catcalling Is Now a Criminal Offense in These Chilean Suburbs.” Global Citizen, http://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/chile-sexual-harassment-violence-fine/.
    “Workplace Sexual Harassment – GLICA.” The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association, http://www.glica.org/workplace-sexual-harassment/.
    “United Nations Global Policy Model | Economic Analysis & Policy Division.” United Nations, United Nations, http://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/publication/united-nations-global-policy-model/.
    John Bartlett. “Chile’s #MeToo Moment: Students Protest against Sexual Harassment.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 9 July 2018, http://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/09/chile-metoo-sexual-harassment-universities.
    “The Global Gender Gap Report 2016.” Global Competitiveness Index 2017-2018, reports.weforum.org/global-gender-gap-report-2016/.
    “Chile Sees 8.1% Increase in Sexual Assault Reports in 2017.” The Santiago Times, santiagotimes.cl/2017/11/02/chile-sees-8-1-increase-in-sexual-assault-reports-in-2017/.
    Editors, The. “Chile’s Student Movement Confronts Sexual Harassment on Campus.” World Politics Review, 23 May 2018, http://www.worldpoliticsreview.com/trend-lines/24777/chile-s-student-movement-confronts-sexual-harassment-on-campus.
    “Facts and Figures: Ending Violence against Women.” UN Women, http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/ending-violence-against-women/facts-and-figures.
    “Workplace Sexual Harassment – GLICA.” The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association, http://www.glica.org/workplace-sexual-harassment/.

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    Celia Mendoza November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Republic of Uganda
    Celia Mendoza

    Workplace sexual harassment is an issue debated in many countries today; both developing and developed. Unsolicited sexual advances, verbal or physical sexual abuse, and sexual conduct in any way endanger female workers in any field and make for an unsafe work environment. Often times, women do not have the same protection as men in the workforce. Especially if they are of a lower class, they are at a higher risk of harassment and have a much greater lack of protection. Uganda has seen a rise in recent years of reported cases of sexual harassment in the workplace, despite the laws against it.

    Sexual harassment is very prevalent in Uganda, with over 1 million women being targets of sexual violence every year. It is much more than only workplace discrimination, although that is the root cause of the problem. It also includes much more severe cases of rape, sexual assault, and forceful harassment used as a threat, forcing many women into dangerous situations just to keep their jobs. It is used as an “incentive” for advancement in the workforce – men giving women promotions if they agree to various sexual encounters with the man. Over the years, violence has taken new forms as well. As some parts of Uganda are very slowly transitioning into a technological era, acts against women causing any form of suffering have begun changing and adapting with the times. This is also now affecting more women of higher economic status as well, not just those in smaller, rural, impoverished communities, which is where many of the cases have originally taken place. Many women now report being harassed through social media or in direct messages from colleagues.

    Workplace sexual harassment is an issue that has crossed the borders countless countries and social statuses, something new in Uganda. Women in higher positions in the workplace do have substantially more protection than those working as general employees, however, there are not many incentives and ways women can achieve these positions because of stigma and discrimination against women. Viewing women as lower than men is the root of harassment in Uganda. Creating incentives to empower women in the workplace could give them more say in their community and lessen the acts of sexual harassment against them. Providing training and classes for women to learn necessary skills for workplace advancement can also enable them to work their way up to be seen as equal to men. With many allies, especially in the African Union, Uganda hopes to collaborate to find a solution with these incentives and ways of empowerment to substantially lessen workplace sexual harassment. Uganda hopes to work with developing and developed countries to collaborate on similar and different perspectives, but all with ultimately the same goal in mind: putting an end to workplace sexual harassment.

  • TacosInMyTummy
    TacosInMyTummy November 14, 2018 Reply

    Sexual harassment is a big issue that Guyana looks forward to ending. Workplace sexual harassment is a big part of this issue, and can be solved quite easily compared to other forms of sexual harassment. Sexual harassment has been around since the two genders have been working together. Guyana hopes to see an end of sexual harassment soon.

    Guyana has passed laws stopping workplace sexual harassment. The Prevention of Descrimination Act outlaws harassment. This has helped crack down on workplace sexual harassment. The UN has an Anti-Harassment policy supported by Guyana. This has lead several companies to cracking down on workplace harassment.

    Guyana believes that the correct course of action is making it against UN policy for governments to do trade with companies that don’t have a policy against workplace sexual harassment, and not doing trade with nations who’s governments do trade with those companies either. Guyana hopes to work with Russia, Germany, and other nations in this cause.

  • Ellastauffer
    Ellastauffer November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Honduras
    Ella Stauffer
    Sexual Harassment in the workplace is a pressing issue with more than 80% of women experiencing some sort of sexual harassment. This is not easily defined, and this issue varies from country to country and region to region. There has been difficulty in defining sexual harassment, but there are multiple examples including inappropriate sexual advances, offensive comments, or making sexual remarks. Sexual harassment can add on a load of physical and emotional effects such as muscle aches, high blood pressure, and post traumatic stress disorder. In Honduras, victims have filed more than 80,000 accusations of domestic violence and 90% of these case have ended with no conviction.
    We need a judicial system that supports women. Our judicial system is one of the greatest obstacles to applying international instruments that would protect women such as a convention that would eliminate all forms of discrimination against women.
    Honduras agrees with any efforts to help eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace including the secretary-general’s bulletin in 2005 regarding an implementation of a learning programme and 24-hour hotline for staff to report sexual harassment. We suggest the emphasis of reporting, investigating and decision-making. Additionally, victims should be encouraged to step forward and report cases of harassment, through a secure legal system which our country desperately needs. We would support a program that would educate workers about appropriate workplace behavior.

  • TacosInMyTummy
    TacosInMyTummy November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Guyana
    Zachary Scholten

  • avatar image
    Lylah Aikoye November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: United Arab Emirates
    Topic: Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Submitted To: UN Women
    Delegate: Lylah Aikoye
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

    Sexual harassment in a workplace is seen as any unwelcome sexual advance or conduct on the job that creates an intimidating offensive working environment. Sexual harassment is usually seen towards women and it is found that 80% of women have experienced sexual harassment. It is also found that 38% of women experience sexual harassment in the workplace.

    United Arab Emirates’ sexual harassment rates are lower than most countries our size but with its rates on the rise it is not only hurting the emotional well being of our women but them physical health of them too. This also hurts our economy because every year millions are lost from low productivity, employee turnover, low morale, and legal costs stemming from sexual harassment. In the UAE we have codes in The UAE’s Penal Code that incriminates any scandalous and disgraceful act saying in Article (358), “Whoever openly commits an indecent and disgraceful act shall be punished by detention for a period of at least six months.” In our country, we believe that sexual harassment is a very indecent and disgraceful act and shall be punished as one. It is also said in The UAE’s Penal Code in Article (359), that “Whoever attempts to disgrace a female by words or by deeds in a public street or frequented place, shall be punished by detention for a period not exceeding one year and by a fine not exceeding ten thousand Dirhams, or by either of these two penalties.” Also, Articles (360) to (370) of the UAE Penal Code further incriminate acts of incitement or seduction into committing debauchery, which is the excessive indulgence in sensual pleasures.

    As members of the UN women we need to stamp down on a policy for zero-tolerance of harassment cases; to strengthen victim-centered prevention and response efforts, and to foster a safe and inclusive working environment for women not only in the United Arab Emirates but all around the globe. As the United Arab Emirates, we want to drive immediate action in reporting of sexual harassment and investigation of sexual harassment. We want to start providing mechanisms such as 24-hour helplines for staff to report harassment and access support, as well as instituting fast-track procedures to receive, process and address complaints and providing mandatory training. This year we have decided to participate in the screening database on sexual misconduct which prevents the re-hiring of perpetrators. We do this so that we can keep track of reported abusers.

  • Cburkeen186
    Cburkeen186 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Chad Burkeen, Mattawan High School
    Algeria
    UN Women: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Workplace harassment is defined as “harassment (typically of a woman) in a workplace, or other professional or social situation, involving the making of unwanted sexual advances or obscene remarks.” Thus, a workplace can become unsafe and hurt individuals or the company together. This issue as grown over the years and women started a viral #MeToo movement in 2017 to share their experiences of sexual harassment in the workplace.
    Since our independence from France in 1962, Our country is the largest country on the African continent. Yet, the daily struggles of our people are not a national concern. Recently in January of 2016, a new law was signed defining sexual harassment and violence against women as a crime. There was 7,500 cases of violence against women reported in 2015 represent only 20% of the real number, since women prefer to stay silent rather than bring shame to their family. Between 100 and 200 women die every year because of violent abuse. The new law includes if a domestic attack prevents the woman from working for over 15 days, the perpetrator faces two to five years in prison. If the abuse causes loss of eyesight or a limb, or any sort of permanent damage, the law says the attackers could face from 10 to 20 years’.
    Algeria has voted for this law and wants to support it. Yet, many feel it is interfering with family issues. Thus, it’s still going on in our country. We feel we should still support the protection of women in the workplace from sexual harassment. We just do not have a perfect solution yet.

  • Nealsmydad
    Nealsmydad November 14, 2018 Reply

    Lauren Brush, Mattawan High School
    Nigeria
    UN Women: Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

    Through the #MeToo movement, it has allowed a woman who have felt the need to stay quiet to be able to express their voice and allow the world to know of their attacker. Women have been able to speak out and feel empowered by others stories. It has been a movement that has made many women feel stronger from something that has beaten them down. Making this time a good opportunity to discuss sexual harassment in the workplace and how we can stop it.
    In Nigeria, the government has recently passed laws against sexual violence against women. The government has worked hard to please the many protests and movements that has arised in Nigeria. While these laws exist in Nigeria, the government doesn’t work hard to make sure these laws are upheld. With the terrorist group Boko Haram taking 400 school girls and the Nigerian government not working as efficiently proves the point that the government doesn’t prioritize women in their society.
    What Nigeria would like to get out of this committee is to not be targeted too much for its lack of women’s rights. I feel like in this committee will focus on the countries need development on helping women with sexual assault cases. Nigeria would think that developing better ways for women to speak out about sexual assault is interesting, but it isn’t ideal.

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    Zachary Gillish November 14, 2018 Reply

    Germany
    Women’s Rights
    Workplace Sexual Harassment

    In May 2018, the Chief Executives Board held a special session during their meeting in the UK to address sexual harassment. The Board recognized harassment as stemming from a broader culture of discrimination and privilege, deeply rooted in gender inequality. The UN Women is a two-day event to bring together feminist thinkers and gender experts to discuss and inform UN Women’s current work on harassment, with a publication on sexual harassment and assault due out in the fall of 2018. This committee has the opportunity to find policies and protocols to aid women in the struggle against harassment in the workplace worldwide. The main focus of this topic is to find the best solution that does not cross gender equality lines, but give women the chance to fight back if they feel they are being sexually harassed in the work environment.

    In Germany today, we have put in laws that protects women in the work environment from being sexually harassed. The “General Equal Treatment Act” was created in 2006, and grants employees considerable rights and makes it clear and precise, what is sexual harassment. Beyond the most obvious and serious cases involving physical assault or worse, sexual harassment in the workplace, according to the law, means: unwanted physical contact, leering, lewd looks, sexual comments, sexist jokes, or the displaying of pornographic material. The legal obligation on the part of employers to deal with allegations appropriately and to protect employees is also clear, yet there are still ‘legal gaps’ that need to be closed.
    In Germany today, we find that one-third and a half of all women in the workplace had experienced forms of sexual harassment, meaning that women are slowly raising awareness, and breaking the taboo of workplace sexaul harassment. The Laws in Germany are tougher laws meant to curb harassment, and can be taken into a criminal offense. In the sexual Harassment laws they state, “Sexual harassment shall be deemed to be discrimination in relation to Section 2(1) Nos 1 to 4, when an unwanted conduct of a sexual nature, including unwanted sexual acts and requests to carry out sexual acts, physical contact of a sexual nature, comments of a sexual nature, as well as the unwanted showing or public exhibition of pornographic images, takes place with the purpose or effect of violating the dignity of the person concerned, in particular where it creates an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment.”

    Previously stated, Germany has laws and rules that corner sexual harassment and break it. Learning from Germany, many other countries can find simple ways to prevent or even block harassment in the workplace by putting together laws that say exactly what counts as sexual harassment and how it can be handled with the victim and the predator. One way all countries and nations can help stop this ongoing problem in the workplace, is spreading awareness and finding the right way to deal with it besides being afraid to lose a job because of it

  • Karisclark
    Karisclark November 15, 2018 Reply

    Russian Federation
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    UN Women
    Karis Clark
    Kalamazoo Central High School

    The rise of the #MeToo movement, prompting change on a global scale is not one that has gone ignored in Russia. Prominent activists have advocated for stricter laws regarding punishments for sexual harassment as well as more support and resources towards victims. Russia acknowledges the work of these activists not only in our nation but around the globe.

    Men and women have always been equal in the eyes of the law in Russia. In fact, Russia, in the past has taken many first when it comes to the expansion of women’s rights around the globe. In 1917, women were granted the right to vote, prior before the majority of European countries allowed this feat. Additionally, Russia, during the Soviet Union era, was one of the first countries to instate a ban on sexual harassment in 1923. This law enacted penalties for men taking advantage of women who are “financially or professionally dependent” to them. Over the course of the years, similar laws have been in place. However, even with the passage of laws, it is no secret that sexual harassment remains a problem on a global scale. Russia is no exception. Current Russian law still fails to completely protect sexual harassment victims, and women are still afraid of reporting and speaking out about their situations in fear of being hurt, violated, or even killed. Although in the Russian Federation, there is a bill regarding gender equality that is meant for the purpose of addressing harassment, such bill has been stuck in committee since 2003. We recognize this as a problem and believe the UN Women Committee should take adequate, but cautious steps, to address and mitigate this issue, globally.

    While Russia is not necessarily interested in sponsoring a resolution that will support the enactment of strict punishments on sexual harassment perpetrators, as doing so will only violate and infringe upon national sovereignty. We believe that guidelines should be implemented regarding how institutions and work environments can deal with these instances, while also providing resources to employers on how to stop situations from happening in the first place. The Russian Federation is interested in collaborating with other countries in this committee on how and what this would look like.

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