The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association

Violence Against Women

The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.” This expansive definition nonetheless serves to limit the scope of the committee’s focus, by separating the unique challenges faced by women and girls from more generic or incidental forms of violence that are not targeted. Within this limited scope are two broad categories of violence: physical violence, that is, harm to the body, and violence aimed chiefly at the mental or emotional wellbeing of its target. While other UN bodies, including the World Health Organization, have addressed aspects of these problems or incorporated fixes into larger societal health policies, UN Women is uniquely capable of examining violence against women holistically and intersectionally.

 

Physical violence, while often the most publicized, is statistically much less common than mental violence. This is not to say that physical violence targeted against women is uncommon, however – 35% of women worldwide are estimated to have experienced some form of gender-based physical violence over their lifetimes, with some nations reporting rates as high as 70% when violence from intimate partners is included. Physical violence includes everything from battery and genital mutilation to sexual assault. Sexual assault in particular is often portrayed as sex achieved by violent force, but in fact, any nonconsensual sex act is an act of violence. Trafficking of women and girls for the sex trade accounts for more than 70% of all human trafficking globally, with girls representing more than three-quarters of all child trafficking victims. While trafficking is perhaps not as stereotypically violent as sexual assault, it is without any doubt a function of coercion, much as sexual assault is. Indeed, coercion itself is a form of violence, no matter whether the coercion is physical, chemical, financial, or emotional. Because coercion need not be physical, it can serve as a link between discussing the more widely recognized physical forms of gender-based violence and the more pervasive, less well-defined forms of mental and emotional violence. Mental and emotional violence can take many forms, from harassment at work or in public places to targeted messages containing threatening or sexual content, family member or intimate partner abuse, and exploitation of imbalances in physical, political, or financial power. Cultural norms often play a role, as well, with pressure to uphold “traditional values” or “family honor” forestalling efforts to curtail rape, spousal or child abuse, and enforced servitude.

 

The effects of violence against women are felt by the victims and their communities alike, and are as diverse as the causes are numerous. The health effects alone are catastrophic, with rates of sexually transmitted infections more than 1.5 times as high among women who have experienced physical or sexual abuse as for the general population, and the risks of miscarriage, stillbirth, and birth defects significantly above baseline, as well. Mental and emotional violence, the effects of which are less directly measurable, nevertheless contribute to financial, educational, and professional disparities at all levels of society. The task of UN Women will be to examine these issues and come up with broad-based, inclusive, and actionable strategies for preventing violence against women and mitigating its effects.

  • Rachelthomas04
    Rachelthomas04 November 9, 2018 Reply

    Though women comprise roughly half of the world’s population, they face unique and diverse physical, sexual, and mental challenges. 1 in 3 females have experienced physical and / or sexual violence from an intimate partner or non-partner sexual violence, and 30% of women who have been in a relationship have reported that they have experienced a form of violence by their partner in their lifetime. This violence not only negatively impacts their physical and mental health, but also their sexual and reproductive health, and may increase the risk of acquiring HIV. Women are also more likely to experience a form of violence if they have experienced childhood abuse, exposure to mothers being abused, or have little education. This violence can lead to unintended pregnancies, induced abortions, sexually transmitted infections (like HIV), and can increase the likelihood of a miscarriage and stillbirth. Additionally, other issues such as depression, anxiety disorders, sleeping problems, eating disorders, and suicide attempts can occur. Kuwait is no exception to this problem. In 2010, there was 368 cases of domestic violence. 1 in 3 Kuwaiti women have experienced domestic violence; however, this statistic is questionable considering that many deem this a private issue.

    While this problem persists in Kuwait, we still persist in traditional customs. We have no laws prohibiting domestic violence and sexual harassment and men are allowed to marry multiple wives. While rape is a crime, marital rape is not. Women in Kuwait are among the most emancipated in the Arab region, and were granted suffrage in 2005. There has been activist opposition to Article 153 of Kuwait Law, stating that a man who murders his wife (or daughter, sister, or mother) after catching her in an adulterous act can receive a maximum punishment of three years in prison and/or a fine of up to 225 Kuwaiti Dinars (about $748). Our government agreed to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1994, except we hold reservations against Article 9 (2) (equal rights with regard to nationality), 16 (f) (equal rights on adoption and guardianship), and 29 (1) (related to the administration of the convention). Women are generally silent on their private health conditions because they are ashamed to approach professionals.

    The State of Kuwait recommends that legislation is passed to uphold the rights of women. Kuwait is keen to support contributions supporting the actions of the UN Women committee, as we firmly believe in the importance of women’s political, social, and economic rights. We invite other countries to continue to empower their women through encouraged political representation and media representation. Additionally, we are open to discussing possible solutions to health issues concerning women, but unfortunately do not have much experience to bring to the table. Ultimately, however, Kuwait will not support a legislation where traditional and religious values are violated.

  • Waterupmynose
    Waterupmynose November 12, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Indonesia
    Jackson Montuoro

    Violence against women is an ever-present problem present in every country around the world, for nearly all of history. Indonesia is no exception to this rule, and is in fact a prime example. Indonesia’s female violence rates are among the higher ones in the world despite its social equality and mobility available to women (Heise, Lori, et al. “Ending Violence Against Women.”) Its high rates make it apparent that violence against women is more than just an economic reaction, but could even be considered as a cultural tradition. This is a big problem. Violence against women is a non-tolerable offence in which a man unrightfully hurts a woman who can’t fight back. The delegation of Indonesia would like to find ways to combat this evil and would be willing to put in a strong effort to support papers and resolutions dedicated to resolving this topic.

    Indonesia has already taken steps to combat violence against women, with some methods being more controversial and questionable than others. In 2009, Indonesia passed the By-law “Law on Protection of Women and Anti Gender-Based Violence” (CEDAW/C/IDN/6-7, para. 19) In Sumedang, West Java, the law prohibits any person to wear “eye-catching” clothing after dark, and while it obviously has good intentions, targets women and restricts their rights. As a republic with a non-centralized government, Indonesia has difficulty coming up with a single country-wide solution to this issue. It is evident that the government has not done enough to combat violence against women as especially seen by civilian efforts and protests.

    In this committee, Indonesia would be interested in learning from countries with successful policies concerning violence against women as well as supporting papers with the same policy. Indonesia wishes to combat violence against women in an effective yet humane way which wouldn’t victimize the woman.

  • KaraY
    KaraY November 12, 2018 Reply

    South Africa
    UN Women
    Violence Against Women

    Women across the world have constantly been subjected to various forms of abuse, be it physical, psychological, or verbal. The Republic of South Africa is a country suffering from high levels of violence, and although a 2018 study showed that both men and women hold similar views regarding the acceptability of men abusing women, the reality of the situation remains a grim and troubling issue. Due to the deeply-rooted patriarchy that still permeates South African society, violence against women continues to worsen: in 2016/2017, UNICEF reported that 70,813 women experienced a sexual offense- an increase of over a hundred percent compared to 2015/2016. In addition, it was noted that 138/100000 women were raped in 2017: the highest rate in the world at the time, and 65% of rape occurs close to or at homes (UNICEF). In the case of HIV, women are particularly vulnerable: with 7.1 million of its people infected in 2016, South Africa has one of the highest rates of HIV in the world. As such, women who are subjected to sexual abuse are at increasingly at risk of being infected with HIV. Because women are often the first to test for HIV during prenatal testing, they can be labeled as “spreaders,” and, if their condition is discovered, a women can be abused, cut off from key economical resources, or even chased from their homes. This is only one example of the acute forms of discrimination women face.

    In 2016, a UN human rights expect on seeing the “pervasive” and “accepted” nature of violence against women in South Africa, urged the government to take substantial efforts to improve the effectiveness of some legislature. Gender based violence, especially when concerning HIV and AIDS, remains within the highest levels of importance of the South African governmental agenda. The new South African Domestic Violence Act set into place in December 1999 has also helped broaden the term of “abuse” and “domestic relations” to cover a wider range of offenses, and through this act, women have been given a measure of clear legal protection. To specifically address the maltreatment, rape, abuse, or neglect of children, The Children’s Amendment Act was enacted in 2016. As 68% of the victims of sexual assault in South Africa are women, some legislation works to target the very mindset of the country (The National Action Plan) in order to influence accepted patriarchal norms; men and boys will continue to be called upon to break the cycle of abuse, and demonstrations such as the 100 Men March of 2018 reenforce the need for male citizens to advocate for their peers. Education developments such as the Girls Education Movement and the Safe Schools Initiative have proved crucial to the prevention of sexually risky behavior, and its success has demonstrated the far-reaching benefits of education to practitioners.

    Lack of education, poverty, and discrimination in the workforce only contribute to the problem, as impoverished or uneducated women are highly dependent on their husbands, and will often choose to remain in an abusive situation if no other option is seen. So, at the urging of the thousands of women who marched to voice their concerns, the National Government met with Non-Governmental Organizations on November 1 and 2 of 2018 to discuss gender-based violence and femicide. In the sharing of experiences and collective search for solutions, the Summit yielded numerous recommendations that will influence the government’s actions to end violence against women.

    Additionally, many women subjected sexual assault also do not report their abuse to authorities, and the percent of successful court cases remains disappointingly low. To combat this, South Africa’s “radical” Thuthuzela care centers have quickly become a source of healing and justice to the victims of sexual assault. Before, victims were asked to make a statement of their assault in a way that forced them to relive- or even justify- their trauma in unwelcoming environments. Now, victims are admitted into the center where they will be offered professional medical attention and care that provides the individual with not only privacy, but also respect; an investigating officer is immediately contacted in order to ensure concrete actions towards prosecution and conviction.

    These care centers offer various services to women and children of all ages, and with this cooperation between victim and service providers, we have seen a significant improvement in the efficiency of the conviction process and an increased awareness of the issue.

    With the aid of its fellow delegates, the Republic of South Africa hopes to continue to defend the rights and dignity of our women in this coming conference.

  • Jsobol25
    Jsobol25 November 12, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Turkey
    James Sobol

    Violence against Women has become a major problem throughout the world. Much of this violence against women is sexual assault and abuse. This happens in the vast majority of countries throughout the world. Studies show that up to 70 percent of women have experienced some form of physical or sexual violence in their life. Most of this violence is initiated by an intimate partner or family member. Girls have also been accounted for about three out of every four child trafficking incidents. These acts of sexual and physical violence happen every day and are a real problem.

    Turkey majorly deals with cases of violence against women. It is a major problem in Turkey. An estimated 50 percent of married women in Turkey have experienced domestic violence in their homes. The government has passed legislation to try and prevent these incidents, but they still occur. Around 115 women a day are faced with the threat of murder. 237 women were killed in 2013 and 294 in 2014. This has become a major issue in Turkey’s government. Their attempts so far to avoid these tragedies have, for the most part, failed.

    Solutions for these horrors do exist. For one, women could be given more protection from law enforcement and more rights to keep them safer and more secure from being violated. This would allow them greater protection against sexual and physical violence that is a constant thought in the back of their minds everyday. They would have a greater sense of security from the horrors they see on the street and in the news everyday. These news stories are just constant reminders that they could be next; hence, the need for a change to previous legislation since change is not occurring. The path to recovery will not be easy, but with solutions Turkey can become a safer place for girls and women to live and thrive.

  • Priya.patel
    Priya.patel November 13, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Republic of El Salvador
    Priya Patel

    On December 20, 1993, the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women was passed to protect women from physical, sexual, and psychological gender-based violence. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women was adopted on December 18, 1979 by the UN to further the efforts for the advancement of women. Global estimates published by WHO indicate that 35% of women worldwide have experienced either physical or sexual violence―this violence can have high social and economic costs for women and can cause serious short- and long-term physical, mental, sexual, and reproductive health problems including fatality, injuries, unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, miscarriage, depression, anxiety disorders, and suicide attempts.

    El Salvador is one of the most dangerous places in the Western Hemisphere for women and girls with an estimated violent death rate of 9.4 female victims per 100,000 population. Women and girls are regularly targeted by gangs, raped in disputes, forced into relationships, and faced with sexual exploitation. Cultural acceptance of patriarchal and machismo attitudes are cited by experts as creating the environment of severe gender inequality. In a country where gender-based violence is both normalized and institutionalized, women and girls are scared of reporting their experiences to the authorities or seeking help from hospitals. A 2015 UNHRC survey found that 10% of women fleeing violence in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras cited the authorities as their aggressors. For women who experience sexual violence that results in unexpected pregnancies, the strict anti-abortion laws require them to continue their pregnancies. Due to these laws, women who experience miscarriages or stillbirths are often prosecuted for aggravated homicide and sent to prison for 30-40 years.

    Substantial amendments to national legislation have been made to implement CEDAW, and El Salvador has submitted six reports on compliance with the Convention. El Salvador also ratified and implemented the Inter-American Convention in the Prevention, Punishment, and Eradication of Violence against Women. The approval of the Domestic Violence Act (1996) was a chief legislative achievement that established mechanisms to prevent and penalize family violence. The government of El Salvador includes gender focus into education to encourage men and boys to break down sexist values, attitudes, and practices which are detrimental to Salvadoran women. To raise awareness and trigger the end of violence against women, El Salvador recommends a comprehensive education program on the basis and effects of gender-based violence to the international community and suggests the use of help hotlines to report violence. Strict protocols for the investigation of cases of gender-based violence should be followed internationally.

  • Mariapacifco
    Mariapacifco November 13, 2018 Reply

    November 12th, 2018
    Country: India
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women

    There is limited data surrounding the issue of violence against women because of the complexity of the issue and the lack of resources to derive those results. To fully understand the significance of violence against women, we must find ways to more accurately collect data that targets all kinds of violence against women on multiple fronts. As of right now, it is estimated that 35% of all women have suffered some sort of violence. It is almost for certain to say that there is some sort of violence against women, whether physical or mental, in all nations including the country of India.
    We as a committee must find a way to help further what the progress UN Women has done in the past, whether building onto the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action or reframing it. The Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action were created during the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women. The Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action itself lack the problem of mental abuse that affects more women than physical violence and lacks any advice on how to fully implement it into our society. If we chose to reframe the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action, we must emphasize the diversities of cultures in all nations and target all forms of violence, including mental, as it is the most common form of violence against women.
    India of all nations understands the difficulties of finding solutions to accommodate diverse cultures. Much of the violence against women is continued because of cultural trends. It takes time to shift an entire culture but the country of India has taken many provisions since the creation of the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action in 1995. India has created a multitude of amendments to the Constitution to protect women and created many other laws such as the Protection of Women From Domestic Violence Act (2006) and extended the Penal Code to help target specifically physical violence against women. India, ever since 1985, has restricted the use of images that degrade women to help with the mental health of women and to reduce the normalization of violence against women in the media by creating the Indecent Representation of Women (Prohibition) Act. India also has implemented a new education system called, “The Rashtriya Kishor Swasthya Karakram” to educate adolescents on gender equity and specifically tackles the ideas of violence and mental health.
    Why is violence against women higher in some nations and lower than others? How do we shift our cultures away from the normalization of some violence against women? What should be changed or added to the Beijing Declaration and the Platform for Action to make it better yet still accommodating to all of our nation’s? After creating these solutions, how are we supposed to implement these into our countries so we can truly help reduce violence against women? None of these questions will be easy to answer.
    We as a committee must remember that what we do in these rooms will not change the world overnight. It is a process. It’s the process of taking those first steps in the right direction that will ultimately end violence against women. The country of India is excited to work together with all of the nations so we can help take those first steps to help all women.

  • Anishpremkumar
    Anishpremkumar November 13, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Violence Against Women
    Italy
    Anish Premkumar

    The unequal status of women in society reflects the unbalanced distribution of social, political, and economic power among women and men in society. In America, 1 out of every 6 women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape. More than 95% of these women suffer from sucidal or depressive thoughts; Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, drug use, and other forms of distress are increasingly common signs in these women. Violence against women may be one of the most pervasive human rights violations of our time and a form of discrimination that results in physical, sexual, psychological or economic harm or suffering to women. This issue remains pertinent in the world today and must be vocalized during the UN Women committee. In recent years, Italy has taken steps to address violence against women and domestic violence in general. However, this has not seemed to diminish the violence that women are facing in our country. Italy believes this topic is vital and may affect millions of young women living in our world.

    This issue is extremely prevalent in Italy. There is an increasing amount of women being murdered each year with the amount of rape cases exponentially rising as well. Stalking women remains to be a large issue recently, so Italy has increased the consequences from 2 to 4 months in prison. According to a research project ran by the University of Milan, the increase in consequences of violence against women in Italy has not decreased the number of rapes, domestic abuse cases, murders, and sexual assaults. The Italian government denies recent accusations that they do not take action about the increase in violence against women. In addition, the government of Italy has increased the age of consent from 13 to 14 years old in 2015. This has also not seemed to be a probable solution to the Italian public. However, women have been more proactive politically. The percentage of women elected to parliament increased from 20 to 30 percent in 10 years. This has caused an uprising in Italian women over the years. Also, Itlay has partnered with the United Nations Population Fund, and claims to support women empowerment programs; yet, Italy has stopped providing financial assistance for these programs. The government of Italy has again denied these accusations and has claimed to support the fight against the violence against women.

    Italy proposes solutions to assist organizations that tackle the fight against violence against women with financial needs. Also, Italy believes to punish sexual abusers with harsher penalties around the world. Italy hopes that many developing countries with sexual abuse being a large problem to follow rules and penalties of countries where this may not be an issue.

  • Zrosario2002
    Zrosario2002 November 13, 2018 Reply

    11-13-18
    SUBMITTED TO: United Nations Women
    FROM: Federal Republic of Somalia
    SUBJECT: Violence Against Women

    Violence against women is a significant issue that occurs in every nation in the world. Fortunately, within the last couple of years, action to end this problem has become a more prevalent global effort. Despite this, sexual violence still accounts for thousands of lives and mental and physical trauma each year. The Federal Republic of Somalia is no exception to this.
    Last year Somalia suffered a drought and with that, a rise in sexual predators. With droughts comes famine, and women travelled in search of food and frequently became displaced, which means they would travel long distances to find food and other necessities. Women became subjected to rape frequently on their search as they were vulnerable and sometimes without a permanent residence. These two significant issues, sexual violence and hunger, became unexpectedly connected which really shows that violence against women has a wide range of causes. Are there any measures we can take that could domino-effect into the decrease of sexual violence?
    When writing a resolution it will be important to remember that sexual violence has many causes. Be it lack of education on certain topics, rituals and cultural precedent, or a byproduct of major changes in the environment, violence against women doesn’t have one sole culprit for its existence. By getting to the root of this issue we will be able to make strides in eliminating violence against women around the world. Perhaps providing protection to women who report could be a place to start in ensuring that women will be safe for simply telling the truth. In addition to this, according to Jean Lokenga, head of UNICEF Child Protection in Somalia, we must write a resolution that,”treats cases of gender-based violence in a way that encourages people to continue reporting cases” (CNN). As previously stated, Somalia has laws in place to protect women that are rarely enforced so it is essential to remembering this aspect of violence against women in relation to the law.
    In May 2013, Somalia’s government signed a joint communiqué with the UN’s special representative on sexual violence in conflict pledging to address the issue “in a comprehensive manner and as a matter of priority” (Human Rights Watch). The Sexual Offences Bill has also recently been adopted, which criminalized all forms of sexual violence, including gang rape, sexual exploitation, and harassment. Including a clear criminalization of sexual violence in our resolution will be key to ending it worldwide. This may include defining what sexual violence or rape is to avoid any loopholes so justice is always served when needed. That being said, Somalia still has a long way to go in terms of progress on eliminating violence against women in the country due to troubles with ensuring these laws are enforced. What measures can we take to make sure laws protecting women are enforced worldwide?
    Despite the many issues regarding this topic, Somalia is confident that resolutions will be found. Somalia has faced these issues in the past and will look forward to accomplishing policies that mirror the progressive policies of others to leave behind our history of violence against women.

  • Trucy.phan
    Trucy.phan November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Brazil
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Delegate: Trucy Phan

    Violence against women is a global issue that affects millions of young girls and grown adults in all nations. According to the United Nations, violence against women is defined as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life.” Violence against women include sexual assault, intimate partner assault and mental or emotional assault. Globally, 1 in 3 women worldwide have experienced a form of violence in their lifetime. A majority of this violence is intimate partner violence, where a women is either physically or sexually assaulted by their partner or spouse. Violence can affect women in numerous ways. They are physically, mentally, or sexually more unstable, and in some situations, increase their risk of acquiring diseases, such as HIV. For young girls, sexual violence during one’s childhood can lead to a higher chance of drug and alcohol misuse, risky sexual activities, and depression or anxiety. The World Health Organization recognizes violence against women as a major public health problem and violation of a woman’s human rights and the issue must be addressed as soon as possible.
    Brazil would like to find a solution to combat violence against women immediately. Brazil is infamously known for being one of the most dangerous countries to be a woman in. According to a non-profit organization called Mapa da Violencia, a woman is murdered every two hours and assaulted every 15 seconds in Brazil. Gender and domestic violence has particularly escalated in the northern Brazilian state, Rio Grande de Norte. This can be linked to an increase of drug and gang violence in the area. Brazil has specific laws to fight against femicide, the killing or a woman on account of her gender, and violence against women, but have not been enforced locally or federally. Often times, the police and courts fail to implement the laws and impose punishments on offenders. In 2007, the first form of legal protection for domestic violence victims was published by President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. He signed the Law of Domestic and Family Violence, and addresses several types of violence, such as psychological, moral, or physical. In 2015, the Femicide Law was signed by President Dilma Rousseff, which altered the Brazilian Criminal Code to state femicide as a type of homicide and “hideous crime.” The Brazilian government also faces a lack of budget and aid facilities which is greatly needed in order to protect women. For the facilities that are established to help victims, they are often overcrowded and lacking important resources and necessities.
    Furthermore, Brazil would like to work with other nations and contribute ideas to create a resolution to resolve this social and culture epidemic. Brazil wants to work on a resolution that emphasizes primary prevention as well as support for women that has been victimized. Brazil wants to focus on violence against women in low income and low resource settings. Prevention strategies could include starting programs that would economically and socially empower women, getting more funds to establish aid facilities for women and children, collaborating with international agencies and organizations dedicated to fighting violence against females. These organizations include the Sexual Violence Research Initiative and the Violence Against Women Working Group of the International Federation of Obstetrician-Gynecologists (FIGO). Brazil would also support developing guidelines and tools to strengthen the health sector response to domestic violence and sexual violence cases. Brazil expects to work with Germany, Canada, Indonesia, and the United States.

  • Hava
    Hava November 13, 2018 Reply

    Hava Szarafinski, Royal Oak High School
    11-11-2018
    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Ethiopia
    SUBJECT: Violence Against Women

    Women all over the world are facing violence against their gender. This happens due to the lack of legislation, enforcement, and protection in many countries. The effects of the violence are devastating and long lasting. Nations need to rise up and protect their female citizens from this horrific abuse.

    Ethiopia is an African country with a population of over 100 million people, over half being women. For decades, our nation has been working to further the rights of women in hopes of achieving gender equality. Within the past year, we have elected our first female president, Sahle-Work Zewde, which shows the progress we have made with the standing of women in our nation. Yet women still face substantial abuse from men, despite ongoing efforts of our government. In Ethiopia, there have been efforts by universities to teach people how to identify, prevent and respond to gender based violence. There has also been a rise of the Yellow Movement dedicated to change the culture of the country to stop violence against women. Our government has also been active creating special police/prosecution unit, passing laws regarding genital mutilation and child marriages, and supporting plans of gender equality.

    Questions we need to address regarding this topic are: What preventive actions can be placed to decrease these offences against women in the future? How do we help the victims with the mental and physical effects of this violence?

    Ethiopia believes we need to educate the younger generation on the cruelty of violence against women, and the harsh effects it has on its victims. We believe behavioral change in the younger demographic will be the most effective long term solution. We need to teach them how to identify gender based violence and how to respond to it as well. Our nation also strongly encourages to creation of support systems for victims. An effective resolution would include the education of younger generations on sexual harassment, and creation of a support system for victims.

    This committee provides a platform to help further the safety and security of women within their countries. No longer do we idly stand by and let women be treated in such aggressive manners, now we need to support victims and prosecute perpetrators. Ethiopia is looking forward to discussion on this topic in committee, in hopes of creating an effective solution.

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    Sofia Tenorio November 13, 2018 Reply

    COMMITTEE: UN Women
    COUNTRY: People’s Republic of China
    TOPIC B: Violence Against Women
    NAME: Sofía Tenorio Olguín
    SCHOOL: Instituto Educativo Olinca

    China has gone through many changes over the years, and has begun to adapt to an open and modern society, related to the inclusion of women. The objective still is to increase the attention of human equality and gender discrimination. The People’s Republic of China believes that violence against women is one of the most prevalent and destructive human rights violations. Unfortunately, domestic violence is very common in China due to part of society is still patriarchal, just as China was before globalizing and supporting gender equality. For this reason, it has put into action new policies and laws to prevent and eliminate domestic violence. Despite the introduction of key legal protection measures, serious safety concerns persist for victims of domestic violence and China has still to face this challenge.

    In 1980, This state ratified The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, and now it is a must for the members to adopt appropriate measures for the benefit of women . Since 1988, China has worked with UN Women to implement financial and technical assistance to programes in order to empowerment women. Also, China counts with a gender facility, which was created by UN Women China, which is the Secretariat for the United Nations Theme Group on Gender. The China Gender Facility receives a financial help to support projects addressing a wide range of gender issues, including domestic violence.

    The government of China is very concerned regarding the issue of violence against women, and considers that the international community must adopt effective measures to improve the protection of women in conflict. China shall continue to work with the international community to jointly create a secure and stable international environment to advance the cause of women around the world, respecting the sovereignty of the countries involved and the measures they adopt in relation with their own situations.

  • Sirimreed
    Sirimreed November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Republic of Moldova
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Delegate: Siri Reed
    School: Williamston High School

    Women play an important role everywhere around the world, yet are still oftenly the victims of constant harassment, and violence. It is known that 1 in 3 women are subject to physical harm from an intimate partner, and 38% of murders of women were as well committed by an intimate partner. Violence against women can affect their physical, mental, sexual, and reproductive health, and can lead to things like depression, PTSD, anxiety disorders, eating and sleeping disorders, and suicidal tendencies. It has been a topic of focus in the recent years, but since it is so broad amongst the globe, it is an extremely hard issue to pass specific resolutions.
    Violence against women in Moldova is extremely common and widespread. It is said that 63% of women experienced psychological, physical, or sexual violence from their husband or partner, and at least one of every 10 women face violent at least once. The UN Moldovan women offers projects and actions that focus in on leadership and political participation, economic empowerment, ending violence against women, national planning and budgeting, and UN System Coordination. Moldova’s overall goal is to let women and girls to live a life free of violence. UN Women has put out a survivor-focused approach by empowering women who have had to face these acts of violence, and would encourage them to speak their own stories, and advocate for governmental actions to support the prevention of violence. In 2013 CEDAW expressed their concern for the high percentages against women and girls. It has been a widely addressed issue, but is still in need of the most attention it can get.
    Moldova sees this issue of the utmost importance. We believe that this issue should be the most pressing topic of the committee. Moldova sees the most obvious solution as simply passing legislation as the UN that protects women from said violence. We understand that certain cultures do not permit women to be in positions of power, so we would not be in favor of a paper that crosses this boundary. We also do not feel that the UN should be able to require countries to pass specific laws, because that interferes with their national sovereignty. In conclusion, the delegates of Moldova recognize the extreme threat of the rising percentages of violence against women, and want to look for resolutions to help solve this problem.

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    Jasmyne Bush November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Israel
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School
    The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.” Within this limited scope are two broad categories of violence: physical violence, that is, harm to the body, and violence aimed chiefly at the mental or emotional wellbeing of its target. ​According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year.​The Justice Department estimates that one in five women will experience rape or attempted rape during their college years, and that less than five percent of these rapes will be reported. In 2005, 1,181 women were murdered by an intimate partner. That’s an average of three women every day.
    On October 18, 2018, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Jerusalem, Haifa and Tel Aviv on Thursday to protest violence against women, in the wake of a grisly murder in Netanya in which a husband killed his wife in front of their 3 children. In addition, crucial to Israeli colonialism is an attempt at the destruction of Palestinian society. Israeli violence against Palestinian women is routine. Beatings, insults, threats and sexual harassment were reported to be common practices as well as intrusive body searches, which often occur before and after court hearings or during the night as punitive measures.” There are many more incidents of violence that have taken place in Israel. A woman was reported fighting for her life after her boyfriend beat her in an airport, a woman was shot in Galilee by her husband, and many protest are taking place. However, ​a number of legislative measures have been taken to improve legal prohibitions and preventive measures in the sphere of violence against women, the UN expert noted, “Amendments were made to the law of rape and sexual harassment. I commend the current work towards ratification of the Istanbul convention on prevention of violence against women.”
    Violence Prevention and Recovery centers should be implemented to ​improve the health and well-being of people impacted by multiple forms of violence, including domestic violence, sexual assault, community violence and homicide by providing trauma-informed services and programs, elevate response to violence and train healthcare providers to identify and respond to patients who are experiencing or have previously experienced violence in their lives, and engage in innovative collaboration between health care providers and community organizations to provide violence intervention, prevention and recovery services. During the time that women are in these centers, they receive accommodations, food, psychological and social support, as well as protection. They are sent to shelters that are not in their home towns so their abusers won’t find them. Separate laws should be adapted by each country in order to prevent this violence. In addition, a women violence hotline similar to a suicide prevention line would be a great way for women to anonymously get help.

  • avatar image
    Jasmyne Bush November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Israel
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Delegate: Jasmyne Bush
    School: Williamston High School
    The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.” Within this limited scope are two broad categories of violence: physical violence, that is, harm to the body, and violence aimed chiefly at the mental or emotional wellbeing of its target. ​According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year.​The Justice Department estimates that one in five women will experience rape or attempted rape during their college years, and that less than five percent of these rapes will be reported. In 2005, 1,181 women were murdered by an intimate partner. That’s an average of three women every day.
    On October 18, 2018, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Jerusalem, Haifa and Tel Aviv on Thursday to protest violence against women, in the wake of a grisly murder in Netanya in which a husband killed his wife in front of their 3 children. In addition, crucial to Israeli colonialism is an attempt at the destruction of Palestinian society. Israeli violence against Palestinian women is routine. Beatings, insults, threats and sexual harassment were reported to be common practices as well as intrusive body searches, which often occur before and after court hearings or during the night as punitive measures.” There are many more incidents of violence that have taken place in Israel. A woman was reported fighting for her life after her boyfriend beat her in an airport, a woman was shot in Galilee by her husband, and many protest are taking place. However, ​a number of legislative measures have been taken to improve legal prohibitions and preventive measures in the sphere of violence against women, the UN expert noted, “Amendments were made to the law of rape and sexual harassment. I commend the current work towards ratification of the Istanbul convention on prevention of violence against women.”
    Violence Prevention and Recovery centers should be implemented to ​improve the health and well-being of people impacted by multiple forms of violence, including domestic violence, sexual assault, community violence and homicide by providing trauma-informed services and programs, elevate response to violence and train healthcare providers to identify and respond to patients who are experiencing or have previously experienced violence in their lives, and engage in innovative collaboration between health care providers and community organizations to provide violence intervention, prevention and recovery services. During the time that women are in these centers, they receive accommodations, food, psychological and social support, as well as protection. They are sent to shelters that are not in their home towns so their abusers won’t find them. Separate laws should be adapted by each country in order to prevent this violence. In addition, a women violence hotline similar to a suicide prevention line would be a great way for women to anonymously get help.

  • Stenorioo
    Stenorioo November 13, 2018 Reply

    COMMITEE: UN Women
    COUNTRY: People’s Republic of China
    TOPIC B: Violence Against Women
    NAME: Sofía Tenorio Olguín
    SCHOOL: Instituto Educativo Olinca

    China has gone through many changes over the years, and has begun to adapt to an open and modern society, related to the inclusion of women. The objective still is to increase the attention of human equality and gender discrimination. The People’s Republic of China believes that violence against women is one of the most prevalent and destructive human rights violations. Unfortunately, domestic violence is very common in China due to part of society is still patriarchal, just as China was before globalizing and supporting gender equality. For this reason, it has put into action new policies and laws to prevent and eliminate domestic violence. Despite the introduction of key legal protection measures, serious safety concerns persist for victims of domestic violence and China has still to face this challenge.

    In 1980, This state ratified The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, and now it is a must for the members to adopt appropriate measures for the benefit of women . Since 1988, China has worked with UN Women to implement financial and technical assistance to programes in order to empowerment women. Also, China counts with a gender facility, which was created by UN Women China, which is the Secretariat for the United Nations Theme Group on Gender. The China Gender Facility receives a financial help to support projects addressing a wide range of gender issues, including domestic violence.

    The government of China is very concerned regarding the issue of violence against women, and considers that the international community must adopt effective measures to improve the protection of women in conflict. China shall continue to work with the international community to jointly create a secure and stable international environment to advance the cause of women around the world, respecting the sovereignty of the countries involved and the measures they adopt in relation with their own situations.

  • KaraY
    KaraY November 13, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    South Africa
    Forest Hills Northern High School

    Sexual harassment is an ongoing problem within our society, and unfortunately, the majority of those who suffer from it are women; it has been a consistently dismissed issue due to the fact that perpetrators have been able to claim that they “did not know they were harassing” these women, and be released with little to no consequences. Although sexual harassment is not always physically harmful, it demonstrates that even in these modern times, some men feel entitled to treat their female coworkers as objects to be used rather than people. The Republic of South Africa condemns such actions against female employees as a gross dismissal of their worth, not only as professionals, but also as individuals. Sexual harassment is only one aspect of discrimination against women, and yet, there is much to be desired in how it is addressed.

    The Code of Good Practice on the Handling of Sexual Harassment Cases in the Workplace defines sexual harassment clearly states, “unwanted conduct of a sexual nature that violates the rights of an employee and constitutes a barrier to equity in the workplace”. In saying this, our country believes that it is every citizens right to be treated properly in a workplace setting without fear of being accosted. Sexual harassment itself is prohibited under the Protection from Harassment Act No. 17 of the Employment Equality Act of 1998. This act also holds employers liable for unlawful conduct against their employee if they failed to deal with the situation appropriately in an attempt to ensure no blind eye go unaccounted.

    Although these policies have been implemented, South Africa acknowledges a great deal more needs to be done to improve the situation. According to the South African Statistics, women composed 44% of the workforce in 2017, yet only around 30% of Supreme Court judges, advocates, ambassadors, and heads of state-owned enterprises are women. When examining the top 40 JSE listed companies, only one was reported to have a female CEO. It is clear that although women play a key role in the workforce, it is the men who hold the power. Such an imbalance is concerning for the female citizens of our country who must endure sexual harassment in silence in fear of losing their job, security, and self-worth.

    Loopholes that claim the perpetrator was “unknowing” in their harassment must be closed, and unknowing or not, one thing is clear: sexual harassment must not be tolerated in any form. Women should be supported and valued for their quality of work and character, not merely their bodies. Whether it’s from education or direct positive examples, we must work towards a change in the way men perceive women, for they are just as important in solving the issue as their female counterparts.

    The Republic of South Africa looks forward to collaborating with their fellow delegates in order to discuss various approaches to eliminate sexual harassment.

  • Amanda
    Amanda November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: United Kingdom
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Delegate: Amanda Jaworsky
    Violence against women is a horrible crime that unfortunately still occurs in a great amount of the world and ruins the lives of thousands of women. In fact, the UN reports that about 35% of women in the world have experienced sexual and/or physical violence from a partner, or from a non-partner while other reports state that as much as 70% of women have suffered a form of physical or sexual violence. Either way, both of these numbers are far too high to be acceptable in this day and age, and it is imperative that countries begin to work together to improve this situation. If we do not solve violence against women soon all cultures and countries will suffer–society cannot function without its women, and to endanger them is to endanger society.
    The UK is currently doing its best to fight this issue within their own borders and they have strengthened their legislative framework in recent years. The UK has introduced new legislation against stalking, forced marriage, and coercive and controlling behavior. They’ve also introduced Clare’s Law, which requires people with a violent past to alert any future partners of this, along with new protection orders for domestic violence, sexual violence and female genital mutilation in order for authorities to take protective actions to avoid harm long before it happens. The UK also has a strategic plan that is being used to keep track of different goals and different benchmarks for the future, which has been a great way to get and keep the ball rolling.
    In this committee, the UK would really like to see more countries acknowledging that violence against women happens all around the world and there are very few countries, if any, in which it is not an issue. Stronger legislation is of course needed to really begin to protect victims, and the UK would like to suggest that countries without laws on this begin to enforce ones similar to those that the UK has been putting in place in recent years. The UK would also like to suggest the creation of a committee that would oversee the implementation of individual plans managed by each country that would define their future goals in regards to improving women’s safety. Furthermore the UK suggests more education for younger generations that would reinforce ideas of consent and respect so as to curb violent and disrespectful tendencies before they become an issue.

  • avatar image
    James Hatfield November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Japan
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence against Women
    School: Vicksburg Highschool
    Delegate: James Hatfield

    For many years Japanese women and women in general have been treated horribly, and as inferior to men. Women have has to deal with suffrage for many many years, although it has gotten better, there’s still some violence, and Japan will do everything to end this senseless violence. Women are just as equal as men, they deserve to be treated the same. You wouldn’t treat your dog different if it was a female, theres no need to. Just like there’s no need to cause violence against females. The country of Japan strongly agrees with other developed United Nation countries such as the UK, America, Canada, and many more. We agree that more things need to be done for women rights. As the world shifts further and further along women are starting to come out of their shells of being unheard, unrecognized, shut down, and stepping out of the stereotypical shadows. more women are holding public offices, for an example the United States has just seen one of the biggest wave of women running for and winning a public office. Showing that we as a developed society is coming to finally accept women are just as equal. But theres still violence against women in many parts of the world, and we need to find ways to spread equality to all parts of the globe, and find a solution within the United Nations and abroad to stop violence against women. No women will be left behind, unheard, unrecognized, or seen as property.

  • Jase727
    Jase727 November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence against women
    Poland
    Jase Apol
    Sexual violence has struck fear in the hearts of many worldwide as it’s culture has been prevalent in foundations of many if not all nations of today. This product of the times has overrun it’s stay in today’s society as it has still been an active source of fear limiting the growth of nations. Steps have been taken to combat this ever changing uphill battle through proposals within respected nations governments as well as the UN having CEDAW report on the elimination of discrimination against women. This awareness has led to decreasing violence against women in wealthier nations such as the United States, Poland, and Japan ; however, in countries where their experience have them hold on to traditional values make them impudent towards this subject. This culture barrier has festered this topic making it difficult to provide legislature.

    While it is still continuous battle for the equality that women want we have paid dividends to correct our actions to disparage this culture within Poland. We believe we have reached a state of true gender ideology and with this our rates of violence within relationships lasting a year is 2% a miniscule amount. With proper action we have carried out the wishes of what the gender ideology of our country should be resulting in a great place for all citizens of Poland. There should be no further action needed for Poland ; however, we would be willing to help other countries correct this behavior to promote the standard that we carry to represent our country.

  • Layah_Fedrizzi
    Layah_Fedrizzi November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Belgium
    Committee: UN Women
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Violence against women
    Delegate: Layah Fedrizzi

    Gender based-violence is a huge issue that affects women all over the world, whether that be physical, sexual, mental, or emotional violence. Physical violence could be described as any harm to the outer body, while mental violence would be described as harm to the mental, or emotional well-being of the target. Mental, or emotional violence is much more common than physical violence among women. Sexual violence, which can fit into both physical and emotional categories, can be described in many ways, but importantly stating, any non consensual sex is an act of violence. Furthermore, if the victim is pressured into consenting, it does not count as consent.
    Belgium, as a whole, values it’s role of being a safe and peaceful country, and being able to protect all of its people, which includes women. Belgium has recognized that the unfair, unbalanced representation of women in society, whether that be regarding social, economic, or political power, is where these depressing morals and standards of women originate from. To combat the violence, Belgium has coordinated with The Institute for the Equality of Women and Men. The plans they have made will mostly focus on bringing awareness to the subject, so more people will be educated about it. Plans have also been made to give support and protection to victims of assault, or any one of the types of violence listed previously, as well as strengthening measures of protection. Other organizations have also been established that are focused on trying to end gender-based violence in Belgium.
    Concludingly, Belgium would greatly enjoy to see the end of violence against women in this, a proud country, and would like to come together and create a resolution to help achieve that goal. One proposal that Belgium would like to add onto a resolution is creating a requirement that young school children must be at least slightly educated on the subject, so that a new base of society will be created where children will grow up knowing that this kind of violence is morally wrong. Another, less long-term solution is to create a system of well-trusted people, like counselors, at any place easily accessible to the general public, whether that be via over the phone, or in an office, where victims can safely explain their situation and know their careers will not be severely affected. Belgium is a wonderful, comforting place where people should feel comfortable doing any daily activities no matter their sex, gender, or any other personal reason.

  • HeNNaH
    HeNNaH November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Greece
    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence against women
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy
    Delegate: Henna Haque

    About 49% of the world’s population are women. Despite the fact that the world is divided half and half between both genders, about one in five women have experienced some sort of physical, emotional, psychological, or sexual abuse. Violence against women is defined as intimate partner violence and sexual violence. There are risk factors that may initiate abuse at the individual, family, community, and other social levels. Citizens who are at high risk for violence include being uneducated, witnessing family violence, limited access to jobs, and addiction to certain substances such as drugs and alcohol. Violence of any sort has obvious detrimental effects on the overall health of women. Some women have been murdered or have committed suicide due to the everlasting effects of violence. Other women have a high risk of developing STDs such as HIV and AIDS, unwanted pregnancies, PTSD, and diminished reproductive health. Currently, the UN has passed laws do deal with violence such as the passing of the 1993 UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women. The data for Violence against Women for Greece is on the lower side of the spectrum- about 18% of women have dealt with physical or sexual partner violence, and about 6% of that total violence have happened within the past 12 months.

    While physical and sexual violence is on going in our country, Greece has taken considerable steps to stop the violence against women by passing multiple laws within the past decade by enforcing strict protocols. Greece offers a lot of support to women who have been abused in some way. We offer psycho-social counselling, immediate justice if trafficking occurs, training for public officials, immediate divorce, educating officials and citizens on the dangers and warning signs of physical and sexual abuse, and other services.

    Since Greece has taken multiple steps to provide justice for women, Greece would like to listen to what other countries have to say about this issue. Greece will support other countries who have similar ideas and will be more than willing to work on possible resolution papers with our allies.

  • GrunIsa
    GrunIsa November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: UN Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Country: Egypt
    Delegate: Isabella Grunwaldt

    Violence against women is defined a United Nations Declaration as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life,” (GLICA). This declaration has helped to instil a boundary line in any forum of law or public domain. This has proven to be a great way to provide protection and support for women in abusive relationships and or households. Egypt observes that the law of the criminalization for violence against women has been heavily influenced by western ideals, but is also heavily affected by islamic principles (Library of Congress). It used to be that the Egyptian Criminal Code would break up misdemeanors of sexual harassment and genital mutilation, from felonies such as rape, kidnapping, and sexual assault. In the recent years, this code has been modified to make sure these punishments are more severe (Library of Congress).
    As Egypt does not esteem the reporting of such violence or have the highest rate of holding perpetrators accountable, Egypt understands that there is maybe slight need for reform. Egypt would like to see more interference in the workplace and start a reward program for reporting violence. This would give incentive to holding more perpetrators accountable for their actions and would allow for more Egyptian people to see reporting violence as a good thing, not as something to shun. Egypt would like the support of other countries in this endeavour and is open to suggestions that are not too excessive. 35% of women worldwide report experiencing gender based violence, and of that 35%, 70% of that violence is from intimate partners (GLICA). In a study done by PRB, over 70% of both men and women agree that men are in the right to beating their wives under certain circumstances. This is extremely reprehensible behavior, and Egypt would like to see it eradicated. Men should never punish their wives in any circumstances; there is never any situation Egypt can see where such a manner as physical and emotional violence is an answer. Egypt can see the need for reform in this area, and wishes to make changes slowly over a long period of time, so as to not light any unnecessary fires of the citizens who might not be as willing to respect these reasons.

    Works Cited

    Mosleh, Hanan, et al. “Advancing Egyptian Society by Ending Violence Against Women.” Advancing Egyptian Society by Ending Violence Against Women, PRB, May 2015, assets.prb.org/pdf15/egypt-violence-against-women.pdf. Accessed 13 Nov. 2018.
    Sadek, George, et al. “Egypt: Sexual Violence Against Women.” The Law Library of Congress, Oct. 2016, http://www.loc.gov/law/help/sexual-violence-against-women/egypt.php#skip_menu. Accessed 13 Nov. 2018.
    “Violence Against Women.” Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association, GLICA.org, http://www.glica.org/violence-against-women/. Accessed 13 Nov. 2018

  • Rachel_Dick
    Rachel_Dick November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Rwanda
    Vicksburg High School
    Rachel Dick

    Despite numerous efforts in the past, women around the globe remain victim to gender-based violence. Women, unlike men, face particular hardship in physical, sexual, and mental violence. Violence against women encompasses domestic violence, human trafficking, and a number of other morally reprehensible crimes. Violence against women brings great harm to its victims, harm which remains long after the crime has taken place. Violence, in its many forms, leaves long-lasting mental scars on its victims, such as anxiety and sleep disorders, depression and suicidal thoughts and tendencies. This violence can too bring lasting damage to the physical and reproductive health of its victims, leaving countless women with sexually transmitted diseases or unwanted pregnancies. Violence against women is an issue difficult to absolve, as it is deeply rooted in culture, the result of outdated patriarchal societies. Religious dogma too must be held responsible as a root cause of these repugnant crimes.

    Despite the efforts of the Rwandan government to protect its female citizens, gender-based violence remains a widespread problem. Gender-based violence in Rwanda is a direct result of a deep-rooted, patriarchal society, which makes gender inequality the norm. Sexual violence was rampant during the Rwandan genocide, which left Rwanda in havoc. However, the 1994 genocide woke many citizens to the deep-rooted inequalities in the nation, and women, greatly responsible for its reconstruction, gained power after its reconstruction. Despite this new urgency for equality, Rwanda struggles to deconstruct gender norms and remove stigma. Domestic violence is prevalent in Rwanda, encouraged and promoted by religious figures. Rwanda believes it is important to deconstruct these patriarchal and dogmatic religious views in order to protect our female citizens.

    To combat gender-based violence, Rwanda would like to stress the importance of education, especially the education of children. Rwanda believes educational should promote ideas of gender equality. Rwanda too recommends the formation of institutions designed to prevent and respond to gender-based violence. The Insage One Stop Center (IOSC) exists in Rwanda in an attempt to combat this challenge. Through the IOSC, Rwandan survivors of gender-based violence are given medical, psychiatric, and legal aid. Rwanda believes that violence against women is an issue everyone should stand against, and looks forward to cooperating with other nations.

  • Oliviaggriffin
    Oliviaggriffin November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Sweden
    Olivia Griffin

    Violence against women is an archaic issue that must be mended through violence prevention, improved access to services, as well as the creation/implementation of laws and policies. Violence against women is an epidemic as 120 million girls and women are violently forced into sexual intercourse or sexual acts at some time in their lives (“Ending Violence Against Women”). The exploitation of young girls and women into early marriage, forced sexual activity, female genital mutilation, human trafficking and domestic violence are just some of the many ways in which women are forced to endure violence in their day to day lives. The UN finds it important to recognize that not only is this violence detrimental to the mental and physical health of women, but it also inhibits the advancement of gender equality worldwide. Unfortunately, many women fear admitting to being a victim of such violence, and in fact, many places across the world tolerate and encourage the oppression of a women’s rights. Sweden believes that it is vital to the women’s rights movement, as well as their health, that they have a right to reprimand their assailants, and the government is able to protect and facilitate their right to do so.

    In Sweden the lifetime physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence is 28% (“Global Database”). The country has attempted to maintain its prevention of violence against women by requiring all public prosecutions to go through mandatory training on the issue. Sweden has also created a helpline known as Kvinnofridslinjen which is a service provided nationwide to women in violent situations seeking help; the helpline’s main role is to provide information to callers as to where they can seek the proper guidance for their situation in their community (“Global Database”). In the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms Sweden vowed that anyone whose rights had been violated should “have an effective remedy” (“Sweden and Human Rights), they also ensured that the deprivation of life includes any violence created not in accordance with self-defense, prevent the escape of an unlawful person, or for the purpose of “quelling a riot” (“European Convention”).

    It is in the very foundation of Sweden’s government that any violence toward a woman not in accordance with the reasons listed above is illegal, and it is the role of the Swedish government to bring justice to all women affected by violence, as stated in the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms. In order to carry out this promise Sweden has supported actions such as the National Action Plan on the Implementation of UN SC Resolution 1325, which instituted a large portion of women to participate in peace support and security operations to prevent violence against women (“Global Database”). This action plan also protected girls in conflict areas from violence and encouraged girls in violence-prone regions to work with institutions looking to extinguish violence against women. However, despite Sweden’s vehement opposition to violence against women, and its laws prohibiting it the country still struggles with preventing 12% of its female population from experiencing lifetime non-partner sexual violence (“Global Database”).

    Sweden seeks to improve its prevention of violence against women in order to protect women’s rights, as well as their health. Sweden believes that in order to do so the government must create stricter policies, laws, and action plans prohibiting violence against women, as well as detailing the recognized violences, and instituting specific punishments for the types of recognized violences. Sweden is also open to reinstating the former Swedish Parliamentary Committee on Violence against Women in order to provide women with a safe environment catered to equality and justice for females; an environment in which hearings and meetings may be conducted, and in which women work together to “increase knowledge among the public on violence against women” (“Global Database”). Ultimately, it is the goal of Sweden to strengthen its policies, laws, action plans, and community institutions in the prohibition and education of violence against women.

    Works Cited
    ECHR. “European Convention.” European Court of Human Rights – ECHR, CEDH, News, Information, Press Releases, http://www.echr.coe.int/Pages/home.aspx?p=basictexts&c.
    “Global Database on Violence against Women.” International Violence against Women Survey, evaw-global-database.unwomen.org/en/countries/europe/sweden?pageNumber=2.
    “In Focus: Ending Violence against Women.” UN Women | The Beijing Platform for ActionTurns 20, beijing20.unwomen.org/en/in-focus/evaw.
    “Sweden and Human Rights.” Sweden.se, 2 Oct. 2018, sweden.se/society/sweden-and-human-rights/.

  • Brookeorlando
    Brookeorlando November 14, 2018 Reply

    November 6th, 2018
    SUBMITTED TO: WOMEN
    FROM: Vietnam
    SUBJECT: Workplace Sexual Harassment

    Vietnam believes that we should get a long-term plan to eradicate sexual harassment against women in the workplace. We need to take baby steps to eliminate it so the change isn’t as drastic the people. There hasn’t been equal pay among genders in the workplace in a very long time. This tradition has been passed down from generation to generation, and it’s difficult to change centuries worth of views immediately.
    We believe that a good start and key parts of an ultimate plan would be starting a campaign/ posting media on the topic to get people to start having different views on the topic. This at least starts showing people that women should have equal rights to men and get people’s perspectives changing. We could do this for a few years, steadily increasing the amount of media.
    If we begin to see a change in people’s perspectives, we can move into phase two. We should be trying to convince more companies to start enforcing a non-discrimination policy as far as pay goes. The media will not stop, and continue to increase on more wide-scale entertainment sources.
    However, if we continue the plan for equal pay, we can hopefully enforce laws in the future. When equal pay is more accepted in the community, it will affect people with these views less. Overall, there may never be a permanent solution for these issues, but we can reduce and prevent them more than you think. If we go slow and take our time to enforce these, it may be more effective. These are traditions we are changing, not laws.

  • Emilykgoff
    Emilykgoff November 14, 2018 Reply

    Emily Goff
    Peru
    UN Women
    City High Middle

    Women face violence in many forms, from femicide to domestic abuse. Women often have few options to escape the domestic violence they face, and if they do report it they can be left on the streets with no where to go. A major problem Peru is facing is the increase in femicide and deaths from domestic violence, along with women being victims of human trafficking. Peru believes that these are three of the most pressing issues that need to be addressed internationally.
    Peru already has laws in place to prevent domestic violence, femicide, and human trafficking. Peru believes that no women should have to face violence on a daily basis or be subjected to human trafficking. Peru advocates for better policies and less westernized laws, which are not as effective in other countries like Peru. These policies include things like better passport screening to prevent women being trafficked across country lines, outreach programs and shelters for women who are domestically abused, and laws that persecuted those guilty of stalking.

  • AnjaMPeters
    AnjaMPeters November 14, 2018 Reply

    SUBMITTED TO: UN Women
    FROM: Syria
    SUBJECT: Violence Against Women
    DELEGATE: Anja Peters

    Violence against women has been prevalent all throughout history, but was greatly aggravated when the Syrian civil war began in 2011 on March 15th. Violence against women can be defined as, according to the United Nations, “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.” In summary, violence against women constitutes anything concerning the mental and or physical well being of a women. This would include anything from harassment to rape to withholding opportunities because of the person’s gender. The numbers show that women are more likely to be physically and or sexually assaulted by an intimate partner or someone they know, in fact 51.1% of women report being raped by an intimate partner and 40.8% report being rape by an acquaitance. One in three women during their lifetime will be abused in one form or another by an intimate partner. These violent acts toward women can, depending on the severity of the violence,lead to acute, chronic, or fatal consequences. Some of these effects are: physical injuries, depression, sleeping and eating disorders, unwanted pregnancies, HIV/AIDS, and PTSD. Accounting for the fact that women in general are at high risk to be victims of violence, women who are in war-torn environments, like Syria, tend to be at an even higher risk for acts of violence to be committed against them as well as developing sexually transmitted diseases and exploitation, as stated by the United Nations Population Fund.

    Syrian women face many hardships, as does every woman. When the war broke out in 2011, Syrian women, who were in areas controlled by ISIS( ISIL, rebels), were targeted more so due to the fact that they were seen as weaker and inferior to men. These women had to go into hiding to escape freedom fighters from raping and assaulting them. In Syria 44.3% of women are physically abused, and because of the war going on, the rates of child marriage have also increased. From 2011 to 2014 the rates of documented marriages in women under 18 have risen 20%, which cause immense issues for the women being married off such as: complications during childbirth, violence, severely restricted educational and economic opportunities, limited freedom, and an inability to have social connection with people their age. In addition to these facts, according to the FIDH Valerie Amos, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, said that, “vicious indiscriminate nature of the violence that is taking place and the increasing levels of sexual violence, which is affecting many women” in Syria. Although so many women are victims of violence, not many report these incidents because they are ashamed to do so for whatever reasons (ruining family reputation, public humiliation, etc.). A colossal 63% of rapes are never reported, as determined by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center.

    Syria is, and has been at war for the past seven years and we have many issues that must be dealt with, but we believe the safety of our women is a top priority; and we exceedingly want to take steps forward in order to diminish violence against women and the effects it entails. UN Women currently have a program in placed called Women and Girls Oasis, which allows women to make money as well as receiving heightened awareness on their rights through the education of leadership roles and basic life skills. Addressing, preventing and forming responses to gender-based violence is included, and they educate the women on this topic through trainings, and getting them connected to businesses that offer health, legal, and psychosocial programs. Syria wants to incorporate more educational programs like Women and Girls Oasis into their society, because we believe education is the first step into solving immensely intricate issues such as violence against women. We believe the following actions that must be taken are creating legislative reforms to ensure women and men are being educated about violence against women. And then from there implementing those legislative reforms into the Syrian society. Syria is also highly interested in learning about other countries policies that are in place that promote the well-being of women, especially in countries who are in a war zone state like Syria is.
    In conclusion, Syria is greatly looking forward to discussing resolutions to this horrific matter that is affecting not only women, but our society as a whole.

  • Morganr730
    Morganr730 November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Violence Against Women
    Czech Republic
    Morgan Russell

    Violence against women is a crucial issue in both the Czech Republic and the world. An alarming study revealed that up to 70% of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner throughout their lifetime. This has led to a multitude of issues including an increase in the likelihood of developing depression and HIVs. In 2010, the United Nations encouraged nations to eliminate all forms of discrimination against women through parliament, education, and other means. This is important to discuss because of the violent acts women have been undergoing. Our country advocates for global awareness, mutual respect between partners, and prevention for any brutality towards women. We are striving towards equality so that this prevalent issue can be resolved. In order for countries to effectively enact a social change, the United Nations must express what measures need to be taken in order to help this growing issue.

    As a country who has experienced an immense amount of violence against women, Czech Republic fully understands this issue first-hand and the effects it can have on citizens’ emotional and physical well-being. Our country reports that 21% of women have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence at least one time in their life. Czech Republic does not condone this behavior, and we urge the United Nations to help relieve the violence. To combat this matter we have taken a number of steps. Recently, in 2016, we launched the prevention campaign “Don’t Be Afraid to Speak Out!” This movement took place under the motto “silence hurts”, which helps empower victims to speak out and against this problem. This was graciously financed by Norwegian funds, and we could not have accomplished it as successfully without their assistance. In addition, the Czech Republic government approved the New Action Plan for Prevention of Domestic and Gender-based Violence. This policy includes seventy specific measures focused on prevention; this includes legislative measures, training of police personnel, education and interdisciplinary cooperation, support services for victims and their children, prevention campaigns, data collection, and more. Additionally, we are helping this concern internationally. The Czech Grant Agency funded the research project International Violence Against Women Survey that provided a comparative analysis of partnership violence in 2003 and 2013. This information allowed countries to gain a deeper understanding of this issue and its remaining prevalence so that it can be solved. Although we are attempting to make progress, we need financial assistance from other countries in order to successfully stop this issue from flourishing further.

    Czech Republic recommends that the United Nations strongly urges countries to help put an end to violence against women through legislation, campaigns, and any other means necessary so that we can move closer towards equality. We would like to see the number of cruel acts targeted towards women to decrease. We advocate for countries to all work towards this goal unless they are physically unable to due to a war or other extreme cases. Czech Republic would also like to see developed countries support this fight financially to help make it possible for everyone, regardless of their financial situation. A resolution that condemns violence against women will help promote human rights and keep the world safer.

  • Cdavidson
    Cdavidson November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    France
    Colin Davidson

    Although society in the modern age has come a long way, atrocities against women continue to occur. Today’s world sees violence against women. This violence takes two forms: physical and mental. Physical violence can include beating and sexual abuse. Mental violence can be equally as horrific. Constant berating can lead to depression and suicidal thoughts or actions. It is reported that one-third of women have experienced physical or sexual violence from a partner or stranger. 42% of women receive injuries from a abusive partner. Women who are sexually abused are 50% more likely to contract sexually transmitted diseases. It is sad that these pitiful events still take place. One can’t imagine what some women go through on a daily basis. It is up to us to put a stop to this violence and change the lives of so many women.

    France takes violence against women very seriously. Our administration headed by Emmanuel Macrón has made violence against women a top priority. Last year, 126 women were killed by their partner or ex-partner in France. We want to make France a safe place for women. It is disgraceful that women continue to be treated this way. France looks to open the debate for ways to solve this problem. We want to make violence against women a central topic that must be discussed. We are open to any suggestions to improve the lives of women. France has recently taken steps to deal with this violence. We created a 24-hour online service for victims of violence to call. This will help victims get away from their bad situations at home. We criminalized all forms of harassment against women to further discourage violence and harassment. We are raising awareness for women to help make their lives safer. As you can see, we are for helping women, whatever form that takes.

    This is a important issue to discuss. We must discern what will be most effective in preventing violence against women. There are different approaches to solving this problem. We could make punishments for violence more severe. This might discourage some to not pursue violence but it is not enough to protect women. We must tackle the problem at the source. Most violence comes within relationships. We need to improve the romantic relationships between men and women to discourage violence. Training classes and counseling services might prove useful to improve communication between partners and make the relationship more loving and less violent. These sort of steps will help reduce violence against women and make women’s lives safer.

  • Brandontp152
    Brandontp152 November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Afghanistan
    Brandon Pham

    Fire and blood. Since the dawn of time, the history of the world has been shaped through violence. Wars have been waged, leaders have been assassinated, empires have fallen–all for the development and advancement of civilizations. Violence has been waged upon our enemies, but solely our enemies. The Western world accuses our nation of violence and domestic mistreatment of our women, our own citizens, the bearers of our children, the makers of our meals. The allegations that the country of Afghanistan mistreats their women is the most blasphemous and offensive. In 2009, we signed Afghanistan’s Law on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW), ending the injustice and violence that were being forced upon women.

    The glorious nation of Afghanistan, forged through the jihad of my forefathers, will not desecrate or betray the religious morals that our ancestors set out to establish. In fact, we consider ourselves to be quite progressive in our treatment of women and their rights. In 1921, King Amanullah and his wife Soraya vastly improved the women’s role in the house, their access to education, and their ability to vote. The regression of women’s’ rights were largely credited to the establishment of radical islamic jihadists, such as the Mujahideen and the Taliban. However, since their destruction in the 21st century, a new government under Hamid Karzai was formed by the United Nations, which includes women’s rights similar to the reign of Amanullah. The United Nations Population Fund of Afghanistan (UNFPA) has led the Afghani population through numerous strides and progressive breakthroughs. Only one year after their establishment, around 1,430 women and girls had the opportunity to discreetly report violence, receive care and be referred to further services through six Family Protection Centres located in health care facilities in Kabul, Nangarhar, Herat, Balkh, Bamiyan and Baghlan. Over 2,500 police recruits have been trained using a manual provided by UNFPA which briefs police officers on eliminating violence against women. In 17 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, UNFPA has supported the establishment of prevention and response services to support survivors of gender-based violence. Moreover, they are in support of establishing a long term judicial system. UNFPA trained 875 judges and prosecutors from 17 provinces, as well as 850 health staff in six provinces, on responding to gender-based violence.

    A holistic approach is needed to combat gender-based violence, one that brings together the sectors and duty-bearers whose understanding and action can influence how survivors are assisted. Religious leaders and communities must be sensitized to the substantial body of evidence that shows how Islam rigorously disapproves of gender-based violence. Health care staff must be aware of referral mechanisms and trained to provide the specialized psychosocial care that survivors need. And the police, as the first point of contact for reporting gender-based violence, must be sensitized to their duty to survivors, and to the need to act on complaints ethically, proactively, and with kindness. This is UN Women’s opportunity to finally assist the Middle East and to help us demonstrate to the world that Islam is truly a religion of peace.

  • MoeOmran
    MoeOmran November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    United States of America
    Abigail Zhang, Forest Hills Northern
    Women all around the world are constantly exposed to various types of violence that are all detrimental to a their physical, mental, and sexual health. Although defined as any act causing “physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering” to women in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women, this article is often violated in numerous countries around the globe. Whether violence be caused by intimate partner violence (IPV) or unassociated peoples, the ever-present issue of harm and suffering must be addressed as definitively and quickly as possible.
    As an original member of the Commission on the Status of Women, the United States does not condone any sort of violence towards women no matter the circumstance. In 1994, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was passed, providing funding towards investigating and prosecuting violent crimes against women in efforts to prevent domestic violence and ensure that cases are thoroughly examined and confirmed. Nineteen years later, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 was passed by Congress, providing various services to women. These services include free rape exams, no charge for prosecution or civil protection orders in domestic violence, legal aid for those who have survived violence, and many more. Despite all of these efforts and others that work towards preventing violence against women, the statistics are still shocking. Around 3 in 10 women in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by a partner.
    Some pieces of legislation like the VAWA provide not only explicit measures to ensure women’s safety, but also provide gender-neutral protection. The United States believes that using the phrase “violence against women” rather than “gender-based violence” will be beneficial, as the more detailed wording clearly refers to issues affecting women and girls and will strengthen the committee’s attempts at empowering females. By requiring gender identification be the gender of a person at birth, resolutions using this definition will be able to target specific groups easier and allow for even further efforts of protection. Ultimately, the United States wants to offer the most and best protection for women possible. With decreasing cases of violence and more healthy, safe women, businesses, companies, and governments all across the globe will flourish.

  • Emkinnicutt
    Emkinnicutt November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Côte d’Ivoire
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Committee: UN Women
    Name: Emily Kinnicutt
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

    Violence committed against women is unfortunately quite common, especially due to the culture of misogyny, even in modern times. It can have countless long-lasting effects, ranging from anxiety to a large variety of chronic health problems. Violence against women can include physical abuse, mental abuse, and sexual abuse, all having major impacts on not only the victim, but also their communities. When this occurs, it is commonly due to society and its expectations of men and women. Men are perceived as strong and powerful, while women are often told to always listen and obey men. This idea, although there are many exceptions to it, stems from a culture of the past, patriarchy. Even though we have reached a stage in which violence is publicized much more than in the past, there are still extreme power differences between men and women that could induce violence. These power differences are notably prominent in developing countries, where tradition and patriarchy are still very common. Côte d’Ivoire has been quite exposed to some issues with violence, specifically after civil unrest, where many forms of violence, like FGM (female genital mutilation) have arisen.

    Our government has passed legislation regarding violence towards women. As stated in the Penal Code of Côte d’Ivoire, in Article 354, rape is an offense punishable by imprisonment for five to twenty years. We also have passed other laws outlawing assault and violence of any form, referring back to Articles 345 and 355 of our penal code, as well as laws forbidding FGM (Laws 98-757). In the Côte d’Ivoire Constitution, Article 5, it mentions that slavery, human trafficking, forced labor, physical or mental torture, physical violence, female genital mutilation as well as any other forms of degradation of human beings is prohibited. We do recognize that our legislation is lacking in certain areas, including the absence of definitions for many terms, and the lack of a protection program for women, and would like to improve that aspect. We created, in conjunction with the Beijing Platform for Action, a National Council for Women, with the purpose to advise the government on women-related issues. Our president, President Ouattara, has also encouraged citizens to change their attitudes and to promote equitable roles in decision-making for women and men. We have also been working closely with other countries, including other African countries, in order to decrease the number of human rights violations against women through violence.

    As a very firm believer in women’s rights, Côte d’Ivoire would be completely open to working with other countries to form a resolution. Through this, we would definitely support strict laws regarding violence against women. Another very important aspect to stopping violence is by initiating education programs to change society’s views on violence as well as gender. This issue is very important to us considering our culture formerly involved male superiority, but currently, we are trying to change that, especially after being criticized by members of the international community. We look forward to working with other countries It is time for a change in culture, in society, and the best way to achieve that is by working together.

  • Taylorpotter
    Taylorpotter November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Violence Against Women
    Mexico
    Taylor Potter

    Any woman or girl can experience violence. Violence affects people of all incomes, ethnicities, and geographical locations. An estimated 35% of women have experienced violence in their life. Violence is defined by physical, emotional, and/or sexual abuse. Compared to women with no history of abuse, victims of assault have been found more likely to use the medical system as well as seek help in emergency rooms(for reasons related directly to the violence and for other nonspecific issues). Women who have experienced abuse are also more likely to take prescriptions drugs, abuse drugs and alcohol, and require psychiatric care. In Mexico, a new term has been coined for an issue that goes way back; femicide is defined as the killing of women as a hate crime. As a country that strives toward excellence in gender equality, we see the need for further steps to reduce violence. In order for violence against women to decrease so women can feel safe in their city, home, and relationships, the United Nations needs to decide what measures need to be taken in order to decrease this global health problem.

    As a country who has suffered at the hand of gender-based violence, Mexico sees the need and desire for further actions to be taken. Mexico has taken the need for action very seriously. In 2007 we passed the General Law on the Access of Women to a Life Free of Violence, a landmark piece of legislation regarding the human rights of women. The law is designed to achieve two things: first, to increase the visibility of violence against women and girls, and second, to create the political will to implement measures to reduce femicide. More recently, with the help of UN Women, Mexico City Women’s Institute brought together transport authorities, public servants, service providers, women, and grassroots organizations to design a programme that prevents sexual violence in public places. Mexico City is also one of 20 cities participating in UN Women’s global initiative “Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces for Women and girls.” Less than a year ago Mexico showed its support for the UN “Leave No One Behind: End Violence Against Women and Girls” by lighting up many of our historical and governmental buildings orange, the color of the campaign, as well as a week-long exposition on femicide in Mexico. Although we are making progress the issue is far from being solved. Over the last decade, Mexico’s staggering wave of drug war violence has masked femicides in the public eye. As a committee, we need to increase education about violence, give women a platform to speak up and increase government regulations when it comes to femicides.

    Mexico proposes that the UN create resolutions that take a step forward to end the insufferable violence the women face every day, by urging countries to pass legislation that gives victims and families of victims rights. The UN also needs to put a stop to femicide by educating government officials, including police officers, on how to spot gender-based murder. Mexico would also like to see UN Women lead more successful campaigns that inform the public of how to treat women in public and at home. The new campaigns and laws should aim to change the mindset of how to deal with violence cases, as well as provide incentives for government officials to prosecute cases involving femicide to try and put a stop to it once and for all. A resolution that denounces violence against women will work towards gender equality and the empowerment of women around the globe.

  • Graceackerman
    Graceackerman November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Violence Against Women
    Canada
    Grace Ackerman

    Although women’s rights have come a long way, gender discrimination and violence against women are still prevalent in societies everywhere. One in three women or girls have experienced physical or sexual assault during their lifetime, only forty percent seek help, and of those only ten percent go to the police. One of the three founding pillars of the United Nations is upholding human rights, and violence against women and girls is a serious violation of women’s rights. Violence against women impacts both their mental and physical health; this prevents them from fully participating in society. The United Nations Women committee supports women’s right to live without violence “by international agreements such as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), especially through General Recommendations 12 and 19, and the 1993 UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women.” Similar to the United Nations, the nation of Canada is a champion of human rights and, in turn, women’s rights.

    Canada is a world leader in the promotion and protection of women’s rights and gender equality; these issues are central to Canada’s foreign and domestic policies. Therefore Canada is concerned with eliminating violence against women. The issue of violence against women is prevalent in Canada, for half of all Canadian women have experienced at least one incident of physical or sexual violence since the age of 16; every six days in Canada a woman is killed by her current or former partner, and for indigenous women the rate is eight times that. Canada has made efforts to end domestic violence, for example this past May the government proposed Bill C-75 (which is still in committee) that requires a person charged with an offence involving violence against an intimate partner to show cause why they should not be held in custody. As a member of the committee of United Nations Women, Canada was one of the first countries to ratify CEDAW, which set international standards for eliminating gender discrimination, and in 2002 Canada ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (this was adopted by the United Nations in 2000). Also, Canada was instrumental in ensuring sexual and gender-based crimes were included in the draft Statute for the International Criminal Court. In addition Canada has made many international efforts such as organizing a discussion that aimed to open dialogue concerning the development of women’s rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, working in Cameroon to enforce the protection of widows and orphans, and promoting women’s rights across Guatemala, El Salvador, and Costa Rica. Organizations that Canada supports include Canadian Women’s Foundation, Oxfam, and the National Council of Women of Canada.

    Violence against women is a national crisis, and the United Nations Women committee needs to address this issue. Canada suggests that we create a comprehensive, integrated strategy to prevent and respond to domestic violence, and resources to support women extricating themselves from violent relationships. It is important that this strategy can be modified to different countries and their cultures. In addition, Canada would like to see more countries initiating dialogue concerning violence against women and promoting the equality of women nationwide. Canada encourages all countries to end violence against women by taking initiative and supporting policies that will lessen or eliminate this issue.

  • Jbraun2
    Jbraun2 November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Violence Against Women
    The Republic of the Philippines
    Jimmy Braun

    According to a 2013 global review of available data, 35 percent of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence. This is a tragedy. Tragedy not just for the Philippines or the south asian community, but a tragedy for the world. The effects of violence go beyond STD’s and physical violence, but to the emotional trauma this places on its victims. Violence of this nature is built into many societies across the world, where tradition forces women into situations where violence in present. Sex trafficking continues to plague the world, despite the efforts of this committee, placing the lives of hundreds of thousands of women in danger.

    The Philippines respects the UN Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women’s (1993) definition of violence against women (VAW) as, “any act of gender‑based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public and private life. Gender-based violence is any violence inflicted on women because of their sex.” In the Philippines, violence against women remains one of the most pervasive social problems of our country. In 2008, a study conducted by the National Statistics Office found that in 5 women in the Philippines experienced physical violence after age 15. Another study, conducted by the World Economic Forum, showed that in the Philippines, women violence in sexual related cases rate of 21.6% according to a 2010 study by the journal of family violence. Despite our extensive efforts to stop this, it persists. The Philippines has passed extensive laws which impose harsh punishment on VAW, such as the Republic Act of 9262, and the Anti-Violence Against Women Act of 2004, which are both standards for international VAW laws.

    For the past 50 years, the Philippines has been a benchmark for women’s rights. In the past 10 years, the Philippines has been a member of the World Economic Forum’s top 10 global gender gap countries. By the WEF, the Philippines is given a value of 18 on the topic of prevalence on gender violence in a lifetime, 15 points below the worldwide average. As the Philippines has intense laws and penalties on violent acts, we call upon our cohorts in the United Nations to do the same, and to strive to lower violence against women. To achieve these goals, we back the UN Women’s efforts to set up offices across the world, as part of and enforcing the Magna Carta of Women, especially in countries with high sex trafficking rates. Those nations, such as Pakistan, India, China and Thailand, should be targeted with outreach programs and funding for politicians who fight this issue. The success of this international effort is contingent upon the cooperation of every country present. Without every country fully supporting the elimination of this issue, the international community cannot succeed.

  • Spdziuba
    Spdziuba November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Pakistan
    Spencer Dziuba

    Across many nations throughout the world, there is violence against women. This disrespect and violence toward women has existed in the world since the dawn of agriculture and the social system. Although, as a whole, we have come far the the progress and rights of women, violence still prevails in many parts of the world. Within Pakistan, we have promoted the protection of women and have a devote sense of equality. We do understand that surrounding countries, especially Afghanistan, do not appreciate and protect their women. This issue has grown to epidemic proportions. For the sake of Afghanistan and other Middle Eastern Countries, we need to find a prodigious solution.

    In the past, Pakistan has subjugated their women and in turn allowing instances of abuse to occur. However, today, women enjoy the best quality of life than ever before– even electing its first female president: Benazir Bhutto in 1988. In January 2010, Pakistan signed the ‘Protection against Harassment of Women at Workplace Bill 2009’ which the parliament adopted on January 21st 2010. Two additional bills were signed into law by the President in December 2012 criminalizing the primitive practices of Vani, watta-satta, swara and marriage to the Quran which used women as tradable commodities for settlement of disputes. In addition, the punishment for acid throwing was set to life imprisonment. In 2012, the government reinstated the National Commission on Status of Women established by General Musharraf for three years in 2000, later being revived for three years at a time. The bill established the commission as a permanent body with the task to ensure the implementation of women protection legislation and abuses against women. Also, In 2012, the Muttahida Qaumi Movement held the world’s largest women’s political rally in Karachi, with an estimated 100,000 women in attendance.

    As a nation, we believe strongly in the assertion that women should feel safe, without the threat of violence. As a start, Pakistan believes that we should make mandatory requirements for country to have enforced laws about the protection of women. Starting with Afghanistan, one of the world largest proprietors, a ripple effect with ensue and women’s violence will be eradicated throughout the world. To enforce and inform the country about the state of women in their respective countries, Pakistan recommends the creation of the Women’s League. Similar to what we have in Pakistan, the league would work to protect women from violence and prosecute those who deviate from this standard. If a country refuses to cooperate with the UN, we suggest that the country will receive a strong disadulation for their crimes.

  • AbbyZoetewey
    AbbyZoetewey November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Saudi Arabia
    Abigail Zoetewey

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia recognizes that in the past Saudis have been viewed as supporting initiatives against the assistance of women. Saudi Arabia desires to disprove this notion. The Kingdom is moving into this progressive new era. Recently Saudi Arabia has been changing the expectations of what we want from our citizens. Saudi Arabia wishes to both respect our ages old traditions and resolve issues in our community.

    Saudi Arabia has been moving to becoming a more open-minded and accepting community. The country has experienced a period of great prosperity in line with its 2030 Vision, which contains programs to strengthen women’s rights. Saudi Arabia had implemented rules, laws and regulations tailored to traditions, religious values and principles that allowed women more independence as they play a key economic role in society. Laws concerning justice and criminal procedures, child protection, and abuse has been strengthened, and women are allowed greater access to education, health and mobility. Saudi Arabia has also launched awareness raising campaigns to bring attention to women’s rights. Women played an important role in the Government: 30 women were on the Sharia Council and they made up 25 per cent of the National Human Rights Council. Young women can study science and pursue physical education, and women occupy high-ranking financial positions.

    Women now have the opportunity to drive themselves as well. Crown Prince Salman understands the value of having a strong community of women behind him in his administration. Resolving these difficult issues behind violence is something he understands needs to be resolved. He understands that hurting women in the Kingdom, hurts the Kingdom. Women are mothers, daughters, and sisters supporting and loving the people in the Kingdom, without their health they create a more unhealthy nation.

  • Sydney.levy
    Sydney.levy November 14, 2018 Reply

    MUN women
    Violence Against Women
    Chile
    Hello fellow delegates, the delegation of Chile is glad to be here and wishes to work both respectfully and cooperatively with you all. Chile recognizes the concerns regarding domestic violence against women, which remains to be a growing problem. Chile hopes to diminish violence against women to help increase the development of Chile. Violence against women is an issue that needs to be addressed, since it is heavily present in homes where men are considered dominant and women are subordinate. As of 2004, about 50% of married women across Chile, suffered from some form of violence or abuse in their relationship, and 34% of Chilean women suffered from some form of physical violence or abuse over their lifetime.
    Violence against women is defined as “an act of gender based violence that results in physical, mental, or sexual harm.” A multitude of other problems also fall under the term “violence against women”, and are not included in this definition. As a result, these other issues will not be targeted by those able to bring about change on the topic. Violence against women occurs most frequently in households, making it challenging for those people, such as social workers, police, or legislators, to interfere and help remedy the situation. Across Chile, most women are unemployed, with only 43% of Chilean women working in paid jobs as of 2011. This economic subordination makes it easier for men to appear dominant and more powerful. This also makes it easier for women become victims of domestic abuse and violence.
    “UNiTE To End Violence Against Women” is a campaign also promoting gender equality, launched in 2008 by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Working to prevent and eliminate violence against women and sexual harassment, “UNiTE To End Violence Against Women” set out to achieve 5 key outcomes, 3 of these outcomes are: “Adoption and enforcement of national laws to address and punish all forms of violence against women and girls, in line with international human rights standards.”, “Adoption and implementation of multi-sectoral national plans of action that emphasize prevention and are adequately resourced”, and finally, “Establishment of national and/or local campaigns and the engagement of a diverse range of civil society actors in preventing violence and in supporting women and girls who have been abused.” In addition to “UNiTE To End Violence Against Women”, the 57th Commission on the Status of Women(CSW57) met to discuss the elimination and prevention of violence against women and girls, in 2013. Additionally, “Voices against Violence” is an educational program teaching children to educate their communities about standing up to violence against women. The Delegation of Chile is in support of this movement, because it addresses the need to strongly address violence against women in Chile.
    The delegation of Chile would like to suggest possible solutions for the issue of violence against women. Chile believes that the United Nation should suggest the formation of a Global Policy Model (implements global long term policies) that applies substantial punishment to those who inflict abuse and violence against women. In addition to the suggested policy, Chile thinks that the UN should advise the arrangement of national bodies that offer aid to women and girls suffering from domestic abuse and violence against women.

    “UNiTE to End Violence against Women Campaign.” UN Women, http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/ending-violence-against-women/take-action/unite.
    “Chile | General Assembly of the United Nations.” United Nations, United Nations, gadebate.un.org/en/73/chile.
    “Facts and Figures: Ending Violence against Women.” UN Women, http://www.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/ending-violence-against-women/facts-and-figures.
    “United Nations Global Policy Model | Economic Analysis & Policy Division.” United Nations, United Nations, http://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/publication/united-nations-global-policy-model/.
    “Goal 5 .:. Sustainable Development Knowledge Platform.” United Nations, United Nations, sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdg5.
    24/03/2017. “Violence Against Women in Chile | Dianova International.” Dianova International. International NGO., 24 Mar. 2017, http://www.dianova.ngo/news/violence-against-women-in-chile/.
    “Violence Against Women – GLICA.” The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association, http://www.glica.org/violence-against-women/.

  • Matthybels
    Matthybels November 14, 2018 Reply

    United Nations Women
    Workplace Sexual Harassment
    Bolivia
    Matt Hybels

    The country of Bolivia struggles with violence against women. The women of Bolivia have statistically lower literacy rate of about 16%. Studies have show that the education is the most important part to end violence. We believe that if the UN has better education about assault then mental, physical and mental assault will be reduced. Bolivia also has a low amount of women participating in government. This is very important. The people that help make laws for women should be women. We believe that this should be one of the main discussion topics in this comity. Women in government is a large, complex issue that needs to be addressed. The more women we have in politics the less assaults towards women. We propose that there needs to be large scale ad campaigns for women in government ran all over the world. We believe that this will be on of the easiest and effective strategies for getting more women involved in politics. This is one of the most important issues that we face coming into the future and we hope that we can help resolve it.

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    Celia Mendoza November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Republic of Uganda
    Celia Mendoza

    Violence against women has been prevalent all over the world. Gender-based acts of physical, verbal, or sexual violence towards women resulting in harm and/or suffering in any way have deep roots in many countries, both developing and developed. This violence violates their human rights and development in general. Uganda has had many fruitless attempts to stop this from happening. Uganda has worked incredibly hard to keep gender-based discrimination and violence out of its culture but it had been such a huge part of the country for so many decades that, since it has such deep roots, it has proven very difficult to achieve total reform.

    Over half of Ugandan women have experienced physical violence starting as young as age 15. Female genital mutilation is among the many different types of violence taking place in Uganda, even though the practice has been outlawed since 2010. It isn’t nearly as prevalent as other forms of violence, as less than 2% of females have undergone the procedures, however, that does not minimize the severity of the procedures. Female genital mutilation is commonplace in the small ethnic group of Pokot and along the Kenyan border. Among the Pokot, 95% of girls and women have undergone genital mutilation, according to the UNFPA. Protection for women against these procedures and other violence has not been specific enough a to completely eradicate these practices. Mistreatment by a woman’s husband is also very common in the state. Uganda has a long history of domestic violence. Women are twice as likely to experience domestic violence than men, and many cases are not reported for fear of what their husband’s may do. Impoverished women are at the greatest risk for abuse by their husbands with no way to stop the cycle, as they feel their economic situation cannot be changed and feel stuck in these conditions by their husbands. Women also do not feel empowered to do anything to try and stop violence against them because they have never had a voice in their homes or in the community as a whole.

    Reducing poverty, which is very present in Uganda, can greatly reduce many of the domestic cases, those reported and not. Improving the economic status by providing more government aid to the very rural parts of Uganda can help to solve many problems concerning violence that women face today. As well as poverty being a main root cause for domestic violence, many studies have shown that the more educated a woman is, the lower the risk becomes of any kind of physical or psychological abuse. As most of the Ugandan population is living in rural areas, many do not have access to schooling, which could be an important part in at the very least lowering a woman’s risk to be abused in any way. Increasing access to education for girls and women can give them better opportunities and employment so they do not need to depend so much on their husbands and will be less likely to be caught in an abusive relationship. Uganda is very willing to work closely with many of its allies, especially those bordering the state and other African nations who may be in a similar situation.

  • Niaodemays
    Niaodemays November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    South Korea
    Nia Mays
    City High School

    Women world wide deal with incomprehensible struggles, including but incomprehensibly not limited to physical violence and abuse. South Korea acknowledges this struggle, however finding feasible solutions is not only difficult to conceptualize, but to roll out into action and promote. Influencing change within society is not a one day ordeal, and the country is still very young in the process. Currently, convincing and teaching the majority of men within the country that their actions are unacceptable is on the forefront of improvement. South Korea is not yet at the point where violence against women by men is frowned upon, and the problem is commonly ignored.

    As of 2017, almost 80% of Korean men have abused a woman they were in a relationship with. This is an absolutely awful realization to be hit with, but the citizens of South Korea are not aware of the full consequences of a society in which violence and misogyny being accepted can have on its citizens.

    Although South Korea understands that violence against women is an unacceptable issue, and tries to implement a zero-tolerance approach, protecting women is more about changing minds. Changing the stigma about relationships and the role of women is just the beginning of journey of change.

  • TacosInMyTummy
    TacosInMyTummy November 14, 2018 Reply

    While it is a hard topic to speak about, violence against women is a big issue. It’s caused harm to millions of people who don’t deserve it. This violence can include many things, such as abuse and rape. Guyana has been effected by violence against women, and we are doing what we can to stop it. Violence against women is a subject we take seriously.

    In Guyana, we have the Women and Gender Equality Comission, which is a part of our revised Constitution. The Commission is in charge of making sure women are equal to men, and can’t be violated. We also have the Sexual Offences Act, which helps crack down on sexual violence, where Women are the main victims. Guyana’s first lady has condemned violence against women. The UN passed the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women to help the cause of ending violence against women. This sent a message to our government, and let us continue to despise violence against women.

    Guyana would like to do all possible to end violence against women. The course of action we’d like to see is trade sanctions on Nations that refuse to pass laws that make violence against women illegal, and also to Nations that are negligent towards such acts. We hope to work with nations like Russia, Germany, and others to end violence against women.

  • Ellastauffer
    Ellastauffer November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Honduras
    Ella Stauffer
    Women from across the world has been subject to all sorts of violence. Whether that’s physical, emotional, or physiological. 1 in 3 females have experienced physical or sexual violence. This violence towards women causes a multitude of emotional issues and even reproductive issues, including the increased risk of HIV. Honduras is no exception to this problem: there has been over 80,000 cases of sexual harassment between the years of 2005 and 2013, and over a 263% increase in violence against women.
    In 2014, UN Women implemented certain projects and programs which Honduras supported. These programs were put in place for financing gender equality 2012-2015 (F4GE) and the ODA, which use domestic resources to implement national committements to achieve women’s empowerment. All of this said, our government can still do more to combat violence against women.
    In this committee, Honduras would be interested and willing to work with countries who have successful policies concerning violence against women. Working towards finding a solid and cost effective solution to this problem is something that Honduras desperately needs and we are looking forward to taking action.

  • TacosInMyTummy
    TacosInMyTummy November 14, 2018 Reply

    UN Women
    Violence Against Women
    Guyana
    Zachary Scholten
    (for previous comment by me, I forgot to add this sorry)

  • Cburkeen186
    Cburkeen186 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Chad Burkeen, Mattawan High School
    Algeria
    UN Women: Violence against women

    Many women around the world have fallen victim to various forms of abuse, from physical, psychological, or verbal. Many countries including Algeria have laws against this abuse but struggle to enforce and handle the major issue in their country.
    A women from Algeria, Salwa shares her experience with abuse, “when she felt physically able to leave the shelter, she went to the police to inquire about her complaint. They told her, ‘we called your husband, he said you fell and that is why you are bruised.’ The police did not conduct any further investigation, such as summoning her husband for interrogation at the police station or arresting him,” yet Salwa had physical cuts and wired bruises from being tied up.
    She said that a court eventually sentenced him to a fine and six months’ suspended imprisonment. She filed for divorce twice, each time on the grounds of physical harm. The first time, in 2012, the court rejected her request for divorce and ordered her to return to the conjugal home. A year later, the court granted her request for divorce and ordered her husband to pay alimony. When he did not comply, she filed a complaint against him. She said the court sentenced him to six months in prison and a fine. Yet, he went into hiding and was never held accountable.
    Algeria has laws on abuse towards women but obviously does not enforce them. There’s nothing else we feel our nation can do if we already have laws against it. Algeria will continue with the laws we have and not change what isn’t broken. We have a system that still stops some violence.

  • Nealsmydad
    Nealsmydad November 14, 2018 Reply

    Lauren Brush, Mattawan High School
    Nigeria
    UN Women: Violence Against Women

    Throughout the years, women have mostly been the targeted of sexual assault. They’ve also been the main target in domestic abuse by their husband. Around 35% of women have experience physical or sexual abuse from their partner. Men who tend to have low education, a history of child maltreatment, exposure to domestic violence against their mothers, harmful use of alcohol, unequal gender norms including attitudes accepting of violence, and a sense of entitlement over women to be the ones who are more susceptible perpetrate violence to their partner. Many women who have low education, exposure to mothers being abused by a partner, abuse during childhood, and attitudes accepting violence, male privilege, and women’s subordinate status are the ones to put up with this violence and most of the time cannot get out of their situations.
    Even in today’s society, Nigeria experiences a lot of issues with sexual violence from a man harming his wife. A lot of movements have been made but no action has been taken. Same with the child abuse rates. About 1 in 4 girls will be sexually assaulted by the time they turn 18. While the media may take this very seriously and have some people talking, no action will be done by the government to take care of it. While at the same time a man who will assault his partner will only get maximum 3 years in prison. In Nigeria, there isn’t many punishments to show these people what’s right and wrong.
    In this committee, Nigeria will be willing to speak about some changes to how we handle sexual assault. While there is a lot of assault happening in the country, there is no defined way of how it has to change. Our people have their way of wanting to change and we can’t do much with it. But you can try to tell us how to change.

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    Zachary Gillish November 14, 2018 Reply

    Germany
    Women’s rights
    Violence Against Women

    The United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life.” This expansive definition nonetheless serves to limit the scope of the committee’s focus, by separating the unique challenges faced by women and girls from more generic or incidental forms of violence that are not targeted. Within this limited scope are two broad categories of violence: physical violence, that is, harm to the body, and violence aimed chiefly at the mental or emotional well-being of its target. Physical violence, while often the most publicized, is statistically much less common than mental violence. This is not to say that physical violence targeted against women is uncommon, however – 35% of women worldwide are estimated to have experienced some form of gender-based physical violence over their lifetimes, with some nations reporting rates as high as 70% when violence from intimate partners is included. The effects of violence against women are felt by the victims and their communities alike and are as diverse as the causes are numerous. The health effects alone are catastrophic, with rates of sexually transmitted infections more than 1.5 times as high among women who have experienced physical or sexual abuse as for the general population, and the risks of miscarriage, stillbirth, and birth defects significantly above baseline, as well. Mental and emotional violence, the effects of which are less directly measurable, nevertheless contribute to financial, educational, and professional disparities at all levels of society. The task of UN Women will be to examine these issues and come up with broad-based, inclusive, and actionable strategies for preventing violence against women and mitigating its effects.

    In Germany, it is known that the forms of violence differ between men and women. Men are more often affected by violence carried out in public places, whereas women experience violence more often within close social relationships. This also lends support to two studies published in 2004 in Germany. In a representative study investigating “life situation, safety, and health of women in Germany” [4], it was shown that in 99% of the cases, violence against women is carried out by men. A pilot study investigating violence against men [5] showed that men are especially prone to be victims of violence in public settings; however, men were also found to experience violence in intimate relationships. Violence against women creates a base to target men for others behaviors and giving women physical, emotional, and psychological pain that can’t be easily healed because of the predators that create the problem for women. That’s why we need laws in place to help this problem

    This problem is ongoing, but Germany has ways of fighting against it, such as our Criminal Code and how to combat against different forms of violence against women. We have sections relating from Forced marriage, stalking, all the way to violence against women. We propose that each country introduces laws and proper discipline against violence and violence against the women of its country or nation. By introducing a law to this problem, we can cut back on how much violence we have and create a better life for every woman. If each country introduces their own laws and rules according to their beliefs and amendments, then we will not have to cross the line of foreign sovereignty and give everyone a chance to fight against this problem, or create a bigger problem for themselves, showing each nation of the world why we need laws in place to protect our women and give everyone a chance to live a happy and stress free life away from predators.

  • Sksb12123
    Sksb12123 November 14, 2018 Reply

    The United Nations defines violence against women as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life.”

    Women in the Netherlands are not treated the way the rest of the world thinks they are treated. By the age of 15 almost half of women in the Netherlands have been physically/sexually assaulted. An estimated 7.9 per 100,000 people in the Netherlands were victims of human trafficking and 22% of women in the Netherlands dealt with sexual violence at least once in their lives.

    The Netherlands continues to strive to tackle violence against women in numerous ways. The Netherlands signed the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention); the government ratified the convention on 18 November 2015. Additionally, the Netherlands supports the Beijing Platform for Women. In the Beijing conference of UN women there were 17,000 participants and 30,000 activists. Women victims of domestic violence in the Netherlands have legal access to emergency barring orders prohibiting perpetrators from the victim’s home

    We, the Netherlands, greatly support the WHO and all their efforts combating violence against innocent women. By strengthening the WHO with more funding from the U.S, it can have more of a leadership role and strengthen the effectiveness and further strengthen their efforts to prevent violence against women. 38% of murders of women are committed by their male intimate partner.

    We need to implement easier ways for people to resolve issues and talk with professionals about problems that have been occurring in their lives. Most people find therapy in any way to be extremely helpful and it gets a lot off their shoulders. For people that therapy feels awkward or it simply doesn’t work there needs to be support from people around them and people need to be taught how to sympathize with people in a genuine way.

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    Lylah Aikoye November 15, 2018 Reply

    Country: United Arab Women
    Topic: Violence Against Women
    Submitted to: UN Women
    Name: Lylah Aikoye
    School: Saginaw Arts and Sciences Academy

    Although the amount of violence against women is dropping it still is one of the most widespread human rights violations today. Violence against women is said to be rooted in the gendered social structures and not from the individual and random acts. It effects all societies and is a major obstacle to ending gender inequality and discrimination around the world. Violence against women is defined as any act of gender-based violence that results in, or may result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women. It is estimated that about 35 percent of women around the world have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or sexual violence by a non-partner at some point in their lives. However, some national studies show that up to 70 percent of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime.
    In the United Arab Emirates, we are trying to eliminate violence against women. Not only are women victims of this vicious crime but their families and society suffer from it too. Families suffer in the case of intimate partner violence where there is increasing evidence of the negative impact on children of exposure to violence in the family. As for society, it suffers economically both in the use of resources and in the loss of productivity due to fear and injury. In the United Arab Emirates, we are starting to provide help and refuge to those that are victims of women violence. In Dubai, our country has started the DFWAC which is the Dubai Foundation for Women and Children. In 2015 DFWAC recieved 411 cases of domestic violence, and the victims of all nationalities under threat or at risk of being stranded on the road are being offered emergency shelter for the time it takes to solve their problem, including the required support to live a decent life. The foundation has a helpline that is open 24 hours a day, every day. Currently, the only regulation we have against women violence is that if the husband’s beating of his wife leaves physical marks the result will be flogging because domestic violence is not tolerated in the Quran.

    The United Arab Emirates believes that to end violence against women we will first need to stop gender inequality. The United Arba Emirates is ranked as a leading country in gender equality in the region. Under our Constitution, women enjoy the same legal status, claim to titles, access to education, the right to practice professions, and the right to inherit property as men and are guaranteed the same access to employment, health, and family welfare facilities. We believe that other countries should start to have that guarantee too, therefore making it easier to put a stop to women violence. We also think that other countries should provide helplines so those in need can speak up and know that they can be taken care of when in need of protection and help. Another way for us to prevent women violence is to let the women of our countries know that it is okay to speak up so we can take legal actions. But without a certain degree of change from every country women violence cannot be stopped, so we encourage that every country makes a change.

  • Karisclark
    Karisclark November 15, 2018 Reply

    Russian Federation
    Violence Against Women
    UN Women
    Karis Clark

    The Russian Federation recognizes that gender-based violence is a serious matter around the globe. Here in Russia, it is a problem just like in any other country. When one out of four families in Russia are statically likely to have an instance where violence towards women occurs, and only 10 to 12 percent of sexual violence victims contact the police or report their incidents, it is no question that there is a problem in need of solving.

    In the past, we believe that we have taken adequate steps to denounce any forms of physical violence. The Criminal Code of the Russian Federation has a multitude of provisions criminalizing and denouncing intentional damage to an individual’s health. For instance, Article 116 of the code address physical assault, defining it as “battery or similar violent actions, which have caused physical pain but have not amounted to light injury”. Repeated instances of the battery are punishable by law, however, regarding the topic of domestic violence, the Russian Federation has recently taken steps to decriminalize domestic violence. By this, we mean that we have taken a turn away from imprisonment and jail time in regards to domestic violence, and have begun using excessive fines as punishments instead.

    The Russian Federation believes that this may be a more viable alternative for other states as well, as doing so has decreased by half the number of reports of domestic violence leading us to believe that domestic violence as a whole is on the decline. The presence of a fine, rather than the possibility of jail time, which typically does not occur, is enough to discourage any repeated offenses, and would overall mitigate the issue of violence, specifically domestic violence against women. We believe drafting a resolution that supports the furthering of research into these issues, that attempts to find reasonings as to why men are committing these acts in the first place, as opposed to focusing on ways to punish countries and citizens who are committing these crimes is more worth our committees time. There is no point in continuously figuring out punishments if we cannot get to the root of the problem first. We look forward to addressing and continuing the conversation about this issue in committee.

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