The Great Lakes Invitational Conference Association

Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

United Nations Special Rapporteur José Martinez Cobo defined Indigenous Peoples as “those which, having a historical continuity with pre-invasion and pre-colonial societies that developed on their territories, consider themselves distinct from other sectors of societies now prevailing in those territories, or parts of them.” By avoiding invasion and colonization by larger countries and powers, these communities have continued to grow and live off the same land their people have inhabited for generations. Although Indigenous Peoples constitute five percent of the world’s population—370 million people according to the World Bank—they make up about 15 percent of all people experiencing poverty globally. Indigenous Peoples’ relatively small population size severely limits their political power, allowing national governments to exploit land that Indigenous People have occupied for decades. Unless the government formally recognizes that an Indigenous People legally owns a particular plot of land, governments can encroach on Indigenous Peoples’ long-inhabited lands and interfere with their way of life, threatening their economic viability and human rights.

 

According to a September 2018 report to the UN Human Rights Council by Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, governments around the world are increasingly repressing activists who protest for Indigenous Peoples’ rights, frequently through legal persecution and violence. Since 2014, governments have increasingly curbed indigenous communities’ right to protest in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Kenya, Mexico, Peru, and the Philippines.

 

The UN has already taken steps to secure rights for Indigenous Peoples. In 1982, the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) established the Working Group on Indigenous Populations to protect Indigenous Peoples and their rights. Nearly two decades later, ECOSOC established the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) to advise it on how to best address issues that Indigenous Peoples face worldwide. In 2007, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which guarantees Indigenous Peoples the right “to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms” and “to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions.”

 

Although the UN has extended numerous rights to Indigenous Peoples, governments continue to violate these rights effectively with impunity. As such, methods of better enforcing existing international agreements must be found. Furthermore, as new issues affecting indigenous communities continue to arise across the globe, this body must address how to continue protecting the rights of Indigenous Peoples, acknowledging existing UN efforts and recommending new ways forward.

  • avatar image
    Ben Venus November 11, 2018 Reply

    My adviser told me to leave my position paper here, if this is the wrong place please send me an email: BenjVenus@gmail.com
    Benjamin M. Venus
    Kalamazoo Central High School
    Social Humanitarian and Cultural (SocHum)
    Russia

    Nations around the world would like to paint our current international situation as a cultural crisis, but the delegation of Russia sees it differently. The rights of indigenous peoples(1) are important as all rights are, but human rights and cultural respect are paramount. Controversial cultural and religious practices(2) are undoubtedly a human rights issue, but it is the job of the governing body of the nation that said practice took place in to deal with it. We do not have a cultural crisis in this world, rather, we have a minority who refuse to accept the changes our society has undertaken. It is one of the Russian delegation’s primary objectives to address this problem while keeping the committee aware of the human rights that all people reserve.
    Indigenous peoples do have value in this world, but the committee must keep culture in perspective. The culture surrounding indigenous peoples and communities has changed, it only makes sense that they must conform. When you immigrate to a new nation, do you keep your old culture? No. You conform to the culture around you, not completely, but enough to be an active participant and avoid practices that may be considered taboo. It is the job of indigenous peoples to conform to the culture around them in order to respect the nation they are in and to reduce the risk of being persecuted by citizens of said nation. That being said, indigenous peoples do reserve the right to freely practice cultural and religious rituals in accordance to the laws of the nation in which they reside. The nation housing previously stated peoples reserves the right to take whatever action they deem necessary in response to a committed crime. The goal of the Russian delegation is to hold indigenous peoples responsible for their own protection, and hold governments responsible for guaranteeing their protection.
    Controversial Cultural and Religious practices often impede upon the human rights of a person or peoples. It is not common that human rights are violated in the event of a controversial cultural or religious practice. Therefore, as stated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights it is the job of the governing body to handle such practices. To elaborate, it is the job of all nations to regulate and monitor cultural and religious practices within their borders in order to prevent controversial practices that can impede upon the human rights of citizens in the area. No group has the right to impede upon the human rights of a person as stated by article XXX of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the national governing body must take it into their own hands in order to insure that this article is enforced. It should be stated that all people have the freedom to surrender their human rights, if this is done in the case of a controversial cultural or religious practice a nation does not have the right to intervene as it would be in violation of article III of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The goal of the Russian delegation in this instance is to address the issue aggressively while keeping human rights in mind; holding governments accountable for enforcement.
    The delegation of Russia looks forward to debate with the committee and the creation of productive resolutions while keeping the protection of human rights in mind. Can’t wait for another great year at GLIMUN!

  • Asherlock
    Asherlock November 12, 2018 Reply

    Social Cultural Humanitarian
    Rights of Ingenious People
    The Republic of South Africa
    Alison Sherlock

    The rights of Ingenious People has been an important issue since the beginning of colonization. In past ingenious people have been systematically oppressed and denied their traditional rights and freedoms. More recently there have been calls for nations to protect their ingenious populations by restoring traditional rights and freedoms. The Republic of South Africa has not always worked to protect its ingenious people, but after the end of Apartheid we have redoubled our efforts and have made great progress.

    South Africa’s ingenious people make up 1% of the population, around 500,000 people, and identify themselves as the San and Khoekhoe people or Khoe-San or Khoisan. The South African Parliment passed the Law on Protection, Promotion, Development, and Management of Indigenous Knowledge Systems in 2014, the law helps to protect the traditional knowledge held by indigenous people. In 2015 the Traditional Leadership and Khoisan Bill was introduced to the Parliment, as of 2018 the bill passed the National Assembly and is under consideration by the National Council of Provincesnces. This bill would bring legal recognition to the Khoisan people and allow for participation in government administration. In 2017, a draft of a bill that would restore communal lands to the Khoisan people was introduced. South Africa has voted in favor of adopting the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but we have yet to ratify ILO Convention No. 169.

    The Republic of South Africa would look favorable upon legislation that works to protect the traditional knowledge of ingenious people as this is an important part of their communities. We also hope to see discussions concerning land rights of ingenious people and increased representation of ingenious people in governments. South Africa looks forward to working with it’s fellow nations.

  • Ty77723
    Ty77723 November 13, 2018 Reply

    Tyler Cattini
    Committee: Social, Humanitarian, & Cultural Issues
    Country: Federal Republic of Somalia
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    The protection of the rights of indigenous people is a serious and personal goal for the country of Somalia. In 2012, the Federal Republic of Somalia was formed, the first permanent government of Somalia since its civil war that started in 1991. This civil war lead to over one million internally displaced persons (IDPs). The majority of these IDPs were part of ethnic minorities like the Bantu who were forced from their lands in the lower Juba River valley. While the government is trying its hardest to support these minorities and IDPs, Somalia has only received 65 percent of the funds requested for the country in recent years through the Consolidated Appeal and/or Strategic Response Plan. As stated in article 29 of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples “States shall also take effective measures to ensure, as needed, that programmes for monitoring, maintaining and restoring the health of indigenous peoples, as developed and implemented by the peoples affected by such materials, are duly implemented.” It is difficult for developing nations, especially ones with new governments like Somalia to be able to fund all these efforts themselves.
    With all this in mind, there are multiple questions that this committee will have to answer. In the wake of conflicts in a nation, how does support and protection continue for indigenous peoples? How do we help support developing countries in their endeavor to support their indigenous people? Above all, how do we enforce and monitor that countries are following the articles of the declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples?
    Any good answers to these questions will involve a lot of discussion and planning between developed and developing nations. Neither of the two are exempt from the problem of protecting indigenous peoples and it will be our collaboration that will solve this issue. A good resolution will find ways to improve immediate help like the Central Emergency Response Fund help to countries in conflict that may not be able to provide the protection and support that the indigenous people need. We will also need to improve on long term development programs like the Consolidated Appeals to help countries be able to fund support for indigenous peoples in the long term. Lastly, we must determine a way to enforce and monitor countries and how they follow the declaration on the rights of indigenous people.
    This committee provides a new way to support ethnic minorities all around the world and Somalia is eager to get to work. These are dire issues that need to be solved and Somalia looks forward to a successful discussion and hopes to implement solutions through effective collaboration.

  • Hannahziegler12
    Hannahziegler12 November 13, 2018 Reply

    13 November 2018
    SUBMITTED TO: Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee
    FROM: Syrian Arab Republic
    SUBJECT: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

    As a geographic location that fostered many of the first civilizations known to man, Syria’s history of interaction and adaptation pertaining to indigenous populations is plentiful. Until the present century, social divides between town dwellers, peasants and Bedouin constituted the majority of important and decisive dynamics between indigenous populations and the changing world they inhabit. Independently, Syrian civilization has progressed into modern times with relative stability between indigenous populations and their government. Shortly after the start of extremist uprisings in 2011, the government offered citizenship to the indigenous Syrian Kurds, native to the foothills of the Taurus Mountains north of Aleppo and along the Turkish border in the Jazirah. Furthermore, citizens of the Alawite Syrian religious minority, a group indigenous to the coast of the Mediterranean Sea in northwestern Syria, have served in various government positions in recent decades. However, foreign ideals of separatism pertaining to indigenous populations and globalized communities in the last century have fostered intercommunal tensions, coupling with extremist ideals to embroil all of Syria in multi sided conflict that has left indigenous peoples specifically vulnerable.
    If this committee is to fully address the various plights facing indigenous peoples around the world today, its resolution must achieve three things. First, and most crucial, is protecting indigenous peoples who are vulnerable in conflict zones from being manipulated by outside forces looking to serve their interests. Syria’s Kurds, who make up their largest group of indigenous peoples and ethnic minority, have been manipulated by Western allies into fighting the Islamic State (IS) throughout Syria’s seven year long extremist uprising. However, with the near extinction of IS, these allies have abandoned yet another Middle Eastern operative and left ravaged Kurdish communities to face instability and displacement. With the help of the international community, a better method must be developed to protect vulnerable indigenous populations who are so often manipulated by foreign interests with no other goal but advancing their objectives in the wake of the unrest they have spearheaded.
    This committee must also protect indigenous populations from threats of violence by extremist groups, regardless of political or ethnic ideology. The Syrian government has always had a positive relationship with its indigenous populations, and various groups have devoted loyal support to the Syrian government due to its focus on protecting their rights from the threats of extremism. However, these groups, such as Syria’s indigenous Alawite and Christian minorities, have become victimized by the senseless violence brought about by foreign interests and extremist viewpoints that operate within Syria’s borders. Any well thought resolution must confront the realities of blatant terrorism toward indigenous peoples.
    Furthermore, due to most indigenous populations doubling as ethnic or religious minorities in their native countries, they often face enhanced persecution by extremist and purist groups, such as the Islamic State. Because of this, indigenous peoples are often disproportionately affected by the quandaries of internal displacement and are consistently targets of the same extremist rebels and outside forces that have contributed to the upheaval of the Syrian way of life. In recent history, it has fallen on the Syrian government to protect these populations as they have been victimized by extremists whose goal is to threaten Syrian national security through violence. The international community must find a way to better prevent these widespread upheavals that are perpetuated by foreign interests and create strained relationships between governments and their indigenous populations.
    In reviewing ideas on bringing enhanced connection to indigenous peoples, full autonomy is not the solution when this issue is presented on a realistic and adaptable scale. It can be agreed upon that any governing system developed by indigenous populations is fragmented at best, and that measures taken by these parties have the potential to lead to unstable and hostile relationships between indigenous peoples and the country which they are seeking determination from. Wholly independent self determination is not inherent for indigenous peoples, especially for those in countries like Syria who have become embroiled and caught in a crossfire between extremist aggression and the government’s attempts to maintain order. Worth noting is that while parties supporting indigenous independence efforts by Kurds have insisted on the territorial integrity of Syria, the very notion of support only emboldens indigenous separatist sentiments. This strain is not perpetrated by the Syrian government, for it has been increasingly open to talks with Kurdish forces to establish of their role in the reunited, postwar Syria.
    With that said, this committee’s resolution must define a scope of representation for indigenous peoples within their respective governments. This representation, however, should be awarded if and only if the views of indigenous peoples are acting independently of outside interests, have not been tainted with extremism, and are not actively attempting to dismantle a functioning political system. This committee must also consider the resounding effects of what are bound to be its most popular proposals. If the committee’s goal is to increase social tolerance of indigenous peoples, then how can this be achieved if extremist ideals have been embedded into dissenters that threaten the general wellbeing of indigenous populations? If some form of political representation is a worthy objective, how can we assure that foreign or extremist interests are not playing a manipulative and intrusive role in the representation of indigenous peoples? If a better enforcement process is required for international agreements, then how can enforcement be achieved when victimization is not coming from the government? How can we enforce such agreements when there are such systematic and self-interest based forms of imperialism geared at separatism and amplifying conflict? This committee’s resolution must confront the effects of these crucial questions. Syria looks forward to working productively with this committee.

  • ClaireP
    ClaireP November 13, 2018 Reply

    Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Issues
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People
    New Zealand
    Claire Parish

    The Rights of Indigenous People has been a divisive topic for decades as countries struggle to maintain their own sovereignty, sometimes at the expense of the people living within their borders. Indigenous people, long ignored, attacked, and oppressed, are a group that often finds their rights overlooked by the countries they live within. The United Nations has long stood for the idea that every person has basic human rights, rights that are outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that was published by the United Nations in 1948. However, the UN recently realized that this was not enough to ensure the rights of indigenous people were protected. In 2007, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which enshrines the ideals of how indigenous peoples should be treated: not only as equal people with equal rights but also as an equal people, who can choose how they might fit within the countries governance. Unfortunately, the most basic of human rights have still not been ensured across the world for indigenous people. In country after country, they still are treated unfairly. The United Nations has done much to help Indigenous peoples, from the Working Group on Indigenous Populations to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues; unfortunately, this is not enough. Again and again, countries refuse to acknowledge these people that sit within their borders.

    Although New Zealand has a history scarred with opposition and oppression like many countries with a large indigenous population, we have moved past those issues long ago. The relationship between the indigenous people of New Zealand, the Maori, and New Zealand itself has been mutual since the country was first formed; The Treaty of Waitangi, which was the founding document of New Zealand, was written in both Maori and English. It began a country focused on cooperation between the two peoples. In fact, nearly 200 years later, we still do whatever we can to honor the promises made within it. In 1879 the Maori were given multiple seats in parliament. Maori men reached universal suffrage over a decade before Europeans. Even today, the Waitangi Tribunal judges land disputes remaining from conflicts centuries ago. As a result, the New Zealand government has willingly given over 900 million dollars in settlements to the Maori people. After Maori cultural revivals in the 1960s, their culture enjoys a robust presence in our country, with the Maori language enshrined as an official language of New Zealand, and their traditions encouraged and passed on throughout the country. However, we do not see this as enough, and we are currently working toward a constitutional review that will include a review of the various legislation surrounding the relationship between New Zealand and its Maori people, hopefully creating an even more cooperative country. Globally, we have worked to ensure indigenous rights in all countries, and we have expressed great support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, hoping it can be seen as an ideal goal for all nations.

    New Zealand understands the struggles of countries that have a large indigenous population, but we also know it is possible to overcome those struggles. Countries need to be willing to cooperate with the indigenous groups within them, or else we will continue to face a reality of suppression and inequality. New Zealand hopes that the United Nations will encourage countries to find peaceful solutions that work well for everyone involved. The United Nations should empathize the need to listen to protesters instead of swatting them aside. New Zealand also proposes that the United Nations put forth potential solutions to the issues these countries face. By empathizing the benefits of cooperation with indigenous peoples, and describing the various frameworks that nations can build on to move toward cooperation, we will be far more likely to change the attitudes of the countries involved and save the people involved from further violations of their essential rights.

  • Brookeblackwell
    Brookeblackwell November 13, 2018 Reply

    November 6th, 2018
    SUBMITTED TO: SOCHUM
    FROM: The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
    Subject: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People

    The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea is notoriously known as a nation comprised of one of the most homogenous bodies of people to exist presently. As a nation, diversity is not a large aspect of our culture simply because diversity does not play a large role in the identity of our nation. Therefore, diversity and the merging of various cultures, is not something that poses a large problem or is cause for speculation and reflection inside the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s borders. Quite obviously, this leads to the conclusion that as a nation, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea currently faces no issues concerning indigenous people seeing as the citizens of the DPRK are a homogenous body that shares a homogenous identity that reflects the current state of our nation, rather than any aspect of our history.
    However, this does not dismiss the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s role in the global community’s quest to find a common solution to protect the rights of indigenous people. In fact, it is imperative for the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to play a large role in this discussion because we have a unique perspective and differing values on the topic.
    The United Nations adopted the Declaration of on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. This is a flimsy and ill-suited “solution” to the growing issue of how a nation handles indigenous people in their region. The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has two major qualms with the declaration. First and foremost being that the promotion of demilitarization of any kind is in opposition to our nation’s policies, the second being that this declaration is not formattable to a nation of unique policies, such as our own.
    We must be certain that going into this committee our intention is not simply to recreate this declaration. For the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, we stress that the progress and stability of a nation should not be hindered by futile attempts to preserve the culture of people’s not even fully integrated into the society of the nation. And more importantly, a nation should not be held responsible or accountable to provide services for a people who are not actively contributing members of the nation. Again, this would be counteractive to the progress and stability of the nation. These are values the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea needs to see implemented in a resolution crafted by this committee. By hearing the ideas of all nations, we will be able to deliver on a resolution that satisfies the values of all nations.

  • TommyTheCommie
    TommyTheCommie November 13, 2018 Reply

    Social Humanitarian and Cultural Committee
    Evaluating the Treatment of Indigenous Peoples
    The Islamic State of Afghanistan
    Thomas Everett Dixon

    The unjust treatment of indigenous people in the world persists to be an important subject in modern day countries. The lack of representation in government and the lack of protection given to indigenous peoples are two issues in dire need of a resolution. In the past, the United Nations has assisted Afghanistan indigenous refugees by focusing on rural alleviation of poverty. This indirectly helped indigenous people, as the majority of indigenous people of Afghanistan live farming in a north portion of the country. This U.N. action greatly benefited the agricultural indigenous groups. Though the United Nations previously assisted Afghanistan’s indigenous people, it remains paramount that the Social Humanitarian and Cultural Committee of Afghanistan continues to pay attention to the needs of the indigenous people, because Afghanistan wants to promote national unity.

    As a country that has been dealing with a long war on terrorism, Afghanistan has realized, the only way we can fight terrorism is to join together, united, and accept the neglected indigenous peoples. “The first and most important advice that I can give to my successors and people to make Afghanistan into a great kingdom is to impress upon their minds the value of unity; unity, and unity alone, can make it into a great power.” -Abdur Rahman Khan. The quote by the founder of Afghanistan, Abdur Rahman Khan, clearly states Afghanistan’s investment in national unity. Afghanistan promotes the integration of indigenous people in government, because the indigenous people are being targeted for recruitment by terrorist groups. If indigenous people have representation in government, they will be able to share their issues and feel a true part of Afghanistan, rather than falling for promises by the terrorists.

    Afghanistan proposes that the United Nations promote the integration of minority indigenous groups into government to promote equality, and unity. Afghanistan, with its experience fighting terrorism, realizes the effect of terrorism on government stability, and safety of people. In order to avoid the instability and dangers of terrorism, Afghanistan knows the United Nations can promote unity in Afghanistan through economic assistance. With economic assistance, Afghans no longer will feel the division of classes between the majority groups and the minority indigenous groups. A resolution that promotes unity, safety, and stability will assist Afghanistan in eradicating terrorism.

  • Eannalieseh
    Eannalieseh November 13, 2018 Reply

    SOCHUM
    The Rights of Indigenous People
    Thailand
    Eden A. Hodgson

    The UN recognizes the indigenous people group as valid and worth assisting. Advances have been made for the rights of these people, but there is more to do. SOCHUM has addressed and will continue to address this issue, to improve their lives and well-being. The UN declares that indigenous people deserve to “establish their own media in their own languages, and to have access to all forms of non-indigenous media without discrimination.” Within the same declaration, the UN calls on states to provide diversity in the media. Since then, the “International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples” has been celebrated.

    Though Thailand’s description of indigenous people is a tad loose and ill-defined, these people make up an estimated 1% of the population. The considered indigenous people fit into three groups: The hill tribes, sea people, and those who live along the borders of Laos and Cambodia. Throughout Thailand’s history, these people have suffered severe discrimination and ostracization towards them and their chosen lifestyles. The Thai constitution does not recognize indigenous people, they and their rights are rendered invisible. There are no development policies or programs in favor of these people groups, and the constitution has not been reformed. Indigenous people have been working for years to obtain Thai citizenship, but with no avail. With citizenship comes many benefits, such as the rights to land, education, and the freedom of movement and education. There is still hope, for there is an ongoing program to register all people living in remote areas as citizens, who have proof that at least one parent was born in Thailand. However, many of the people living in these areas may find it hard to find proper documentation (often due to their circumstances) and many lack the necessary paperwork. This operation has slowed because of the aforementioned issues, and it’s estimated that over 100,000 indigenous people are still without citizenship.

    Thailand strongly suggests indigenous people should support and invest in themselves, and the governments should avoid interfering in the lives of this minority. The group is incredibly small and outreach is inefficient, with the vast majority of indigenous people living far beyond majorly inhabited places, or along borderlines. Assisting people like this will only limit all that the states can do. The UN should not intrude in the lives of these people.

  • Semaj
    Semaj November 13, 2018 Reply

    Myanmar’s population border over 100 unique ethnic groups. Myanmar has recently adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Yet Myanmar’s indigenous peoples still face a number of challenges, including armed conflict, violations of human and land rights. Despite the many reforms that have taken place to stop the violence and discrimination the indigenous peoples still have not been able to claim their land due to the state-sponsored cronyism,
    In 2007 Myanmar had joined the international community in adopting the United Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Myanmar seeks to rebuild a new federal democratic state and make amends with its own indigenous peoples because of past endeavors. We urge to enact a relevant law giving full legal recognition of the rights to traditional land use and land tenure system of indigenous peoples. Finally, in January 2016, we issued a National Land Use Policy (NLUP), which acknowledges and calls for the safeguarding of the customary land rights and practices of Indigenous Peoples, comprehensive of the controversial practice of rotating or shifting cultivation, which is widely understood as just an Indigenous Peoples issue. The policy’s explicit recognition of and call for the protection of shifting cultivation is very significant, given the widespread diminishment of this practice as an inherently “inefficient,” “unproductive,” and “destructive” form of “slash and burn” cultivation that causes much harm to the land.
    Over the years we as the government have struggled to find a medium to work with the constraints of our non indigenous people and the indigenous people.With Myanmar continuing to transition into a more open and democratic state, the Myanmar Indigenous Peoples/Ethnic Nationalities Network is committed to making constructive and positive contributions to the development of rights of indigenous peoples in Myanmar while respecting the rights of others.

    • Semaj
      Semaj November 13, 2018 Reply

      13 November 2018
      SUBMITTED TO: Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee
      FROM: Myanmar
      SUBJECT: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

      Myanmar’s population border over 100 unique ethnic groups. Myanmar has recently adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.Yet Myanmar’s indigenous peoples still face a number of challenges, including armed conflict, violations of human and land rights. Despite the many reforms that have taken place to stop the violence and discrimination the indigenous peoples still have not been able to claim their land due to the state-sponsored cronyism. Ethnic conflict and human rights misemploy against Indigenous Peoples or specific ethnic groups. The difficult situation of indigenous ethnic minorities in Myanmar has received comparatively little attention and we are doing all that we can to raise awareness. We never cease to spur countries to protect rights of the indigenous people and treat them with the equal rights as everyone else.

      In 2007 Myanmar had joined the international community in adopting the United Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Myanmar seeks to rebuild a new federal democratic state and make amends with its own indigenous peoples because of past endeavors. We urge to enact a relevant law giving full legal recognition of the rights to traditional land use and land tenure system of indigenous peoples. Finally, in January 2016, we issued a National Land Use Policy (NLUP), which acknowledges and calls for the safeguarding of the customary land rights and practices of Indigenous Peoples, comprehensive of the controversial practice of rotating or shifting cultivation, which is widely understood as just an Indigenous Peoples issue. The policy’s explicit recognition of and call for the protection of shifting cultivation is very significant, given the widespread diminishment of this practice as an inherently “inefficient,” “unproductive,” and “destructive” form of “slash and burn” cultivation that causes much harm to the land. In that sense we are protecting our agriculture while not adding any detrimental to our indigenous people.

      Over the years we as the government have struggled to find a medium to work with the constraints of our non indigenous people and the indigenous people.With Myanmar continuing to transition into a more open and democratic state, the Myanmar Indigenous Peoples/Ethnic Nationalities Network is committed to making constructive and positive contributions to the development of rights of indigenous peoples in Myanmar while respecting the rights of others.

  • Jackson_Wicka
    Jackson_Wicka November 13, 2018 Reply

    Date 11/11/18
    Submitted to: SOCHUM
    Submitted by : Ethiopia
    Subject the Rights of Indigenous people

    The history of the nation of Ethiopia has been one of struggle but Strength through that struggle. History of the nation of Ethiopia has been one of struggle but Strank‘s through that struggle. Since the beginning of the age of imperialism, many nations have tried to conquer our nation but we have stood strong through the attempts to conquer our nation since the beginning of the age of imperialism many nations have tried to conquer our nation but we have stood strong through the attempts to conquer our nation. Our nation was eventually conquered by the Italians in 1937 But through our occupational we struggled in eventually the struggle ended at our nation was free once again. This began and age of modernization in our nation or we focused on becoming more of a world player in improving the lives of our civilians.

    While we are a nation of many tribes in peoples. With limited resources of our government or national policy will be more focused on protecting and modernizing and modernizing The nation of Ethiopia rather than focusing are resources indigenous peoples. The money of our government as well as the resources are you going to be put towards much-needed infrastructure to benefit all people instead of just a certain group. With a densely rural nation infrastructure The nation must have roads, hospitals, schools, and businesses. While we may be a nation a need at times our nation will not beg your plead for Monty. Our nation is a proud one and capable of helping itself. This committee while its goals maybe To help the indigenous peoples the committee mustn’t put regulations or add on extra tasks for a nation to achieve while working on the betterment of the nation for all people instead of just indigenous people. As our nation has already a limited amount of funds and does not need to be burdened by extra regulations to help a specific group of people when finds it could help all . For example who is this pitch if this committee decide if this committee decided That each government need to set a part a specific large chunk of land for the indigenous people that would hurt our nation because that lamb could be better used for sugar plantations or other agricultural sites which would help people. The nation of Ethiopia will not stand behind any harmful regulations which could hurt our people.

    articles which would make a resolution successful or as the following. First that any regulations that our committee does decide to pass will not harm the nation economically, militarily, or politically. Secondly any resolution must not put the rights what’s not but the rates of indigenous peoples over the other people of the nation for that would cost to distraction of a nation. Our nation is weary of any regulations that will be passed as we firmly believe they’ll be harmful to our nation and our tent to modernize and thrive in the modern world. Our nation believes that there already enough hindrances towards African nations at any regulations would just become another hindrance to our nation progress and development so we ask how committed to keep an open mind with our quorum‘s and takes them seriously.

    in conclusion the nation of Ethiopian is very excited to work with all of you in committee to solve the problems that are facing our committee. We also hope that our debate is fruitful and the resolutions coming out of a committee show that. Will look forward to committee. And hope that our demands are met with seriousness.

  • Markw0926
    Markw0926 November 13, 2018 Reply

    Social Humanitarian and Cultural Committee
    Indigenous People
    Sudan
    Mark Wassink

    The topic of protection of indigenous peoples is important for the committee to address for the security of the citizens hurt as a result as well as their fellow citizens and the economy. The delegation of Sudan knows first hand of the results of discrimination against indigenous peoples. They understand this as a result of local rebels and their actions against some of the local tribes and people. Sudan also understands the sentiment felt by many about issues among tribes and looks to address them. Only through stability will Sudan be able to address these concerns.

    The topic is an issue in Sudan; it deeply affects their citizens. The delegates of Sudan understand the the need to protect indigenous peoples. The ethnic groups of Sudan are Arabs of which there are Nubians, Beja, Fur, Nuba, and Fallata among others. It is important to consider context when discussing how to address land concerns and claims to government lands. Sudan also wishes to consider national sovereignty in decisions and resolutions. Since the United Nations also cannot directly legislate policy regarding indigenous, Sudan would like to see the committee pursue action that would hurt the long term efforts of the rebels in our nation. Sudan has tried to solve indigenous disputes among our citizens, but roadblocks posed by the UN and other problems have hindered our efforts at finding a solution to the problem. Unfortunately, the government of Sudan has been characterized as the culprit of mass murder and genocide against indigenous peoples. Sudan has slowed the actions against indigenous peoples by murderous rebel groups. Sudan has also recognized the threat that some rebel groups pose to their citizens, and takes action to help provide stability and security.

    Sudan wishes to see an end to the allegations from the UN regarding treatment of indigenous peoples. Sudan would like to see the UN approach rebel groups that pose a threat to the security of indigenous peoples as well as those who pose a threat to the country. Sudan wishes for the committee to help recognize the threat that rebels pose to the stability of their country and the power needed by the government to stop conflict. Ideally, the committee should restore the ability of Sudan to help provide regulation and oversight to their conflicts.

  • Gabegoudreau
    Gabegoudreau November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Israel
    Committee: Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Issues
    Topic: Protecting Indigenous people
    Delegate: Gabe Goudreau
    School: Williamston High School

    Across the world, in 90 countries there are approximately 370 million groups of indigenous peoples. In each of this countries, these people need to be recognized and protected by the government. With these indigenous people, there are different problems for each group of people. Some quick examples are healthcare, social inequalities, and vanishing culture. Many of these indigenous people are disease-ridden and stranded without access to healthcare. These indigenous people face social inequalities solely based on their national origin. Also, there are many instances of vanishing culture, due to the assimilation of the general population.
    As one of the most diverse countries in the world, Israel recognizes the need for equal representation of all of its inhabitants. One overarching problem is that there is a widespread debate on who were the first actual people of Israel. Now our country is a predominantly Jewish country and is completely in favor of having everyone represented without resorting to violence. In our country, we have a bit of a distaste among Jews, Arabs, Palestinians, Non-Arab Christians, and Non-Arab Muslims. However, Israel is still considered “A State of the Jewish People, and not of all its citizens.” With this diversity, there are still issues that persist within our country. One issue is the clash of 600,000 Palestinian settlers at the Gaza strip. Many have claimed that the way the Israeli government has handled this is a violation of international law, we feel that we could have handled this issue better with coordination with the Hamas but we did institute our blockade of the Gaza Strip well in order to prevent the loss of lives.
    Israel has seen firsthand the outcomes of resorting to violence and we wholeheartedly express our cooperation for a solution to this problem of protecting our indigenous people. One proposed solution for this is to allow for a more diverse community of people in Israel and punish hate crimes against Palestinians, and Arabs in our country. We will protect our indigenous people by allowing for culture to not be suppressed by extremists of any side. Another proposed idea is to expand Israel, to allow for indigenous groups to be separate from each other in order to reduce violence among our many groups in Israel, support from the international community is needed financially, and we are up for new ideas as long as our people are protected in every way. In a resolution, Israel would like to see our people protected over everything, and we hope a peaceful solution will be met.

  • Oliviacarpenter
    Oliviacarpenter November 13, 2018 Reply

    Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Issues
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People
    The Kingdom of Norway
    Olivia Carpenter

    Colonization brings new developments and new governments, and with that brings oppression. Indigenous peoples rights are being oppressed, their land invaded, and their communities ruined. The Kingdom of Norway continues to urge countries to not only protect, but also to strengthen the rights of the indigenous people, and to improve their impoverished living conditions.

    The Kingdom of Norway is constantly adopting new regulations to protect the rights of their indigenous Sami population and other indigenous populations around the world. Since the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People in 2007, the Norwegian Government has strengthened the right of the Sami people to participate in the decision making and political process, has adopted new regulations relating to the protection of traditional knowledge, and has declared that the Sami people should be able to preserve, practice and develop their culture with as few barriers as possible due to national borders. The Kingdom of Norway will continue to strive for the strengthening and protection of the indigenous peoples rights and cultures.

    The Kingdom of Norway would look favorably upon a resolution that not only protects, but also strengthens and assures the rights of the indigenous people and to urge governments to cooperate with their indigenous population to avoid any further oppression.

  • Harrison-Powell
    Harrison-Powell November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Bangladesh
    Topic: Protecting The RIghts of Indigenous People
    Delegate: Harrison Powell
    Committee: SOCHUM
    School: Williamston High School

    Many countries around the world have people who have been living there for thousands of years. These people are classified as indigenous people have now been fought against for years. They have also been helped by current people living there who moved hundreds of years after the indigenous people. Even though they have been helped they are still oppressed. Indigenous people are will almost always be minorities in almost every country they inhabit in the world and are often be discriminated against. Indigenous people have been helped by the United Nations before with the writing of the Declaration of Rights for Indigenous Peoples. The declaration stated that Indigenous Peoples have the same rights as any other human in the countries that voted yes. Indigenous people are recognized but, are discriminated and it is up to the United Nations to help.

    In Bangladesh there is one common ethnicity and that is Bengali. Bengali ethnicity makes up ninety eight percent of the of the country. The other two percent of the country is made up of tribes of indigenous people, whom almost all of them live in the Chittagong Hill Tract area or CHT. Larger Tribes in the CHT like the Charma and Marma people have grown accustomed to regular practices performed by the Bengali people. Smaller groups in the area have kept their traditional values and have received negative impact by the Bengali people who control the nations’ politics. The government of Bangladesh recognizes twenty seven ethnic groups in Bangladesh but experts believe there are around seventy five groups. Bangladesh does believe in helping indigenous people but not all people have been recognized. Bangladesh is a part of the 2015 agreement that will further sustainable development by 2030. Goals that Bangladesh has agreed to are no poverty and zero hunger by 2030 which includes indigenous people. Bangladesh has taken a major step forward helping indigenous people by setting sustainable development goals. Bangladesh has also signed the Declaration of Rights of Indigenous Peoples which went into effect in 2007. Many people from Bangladesh helped write the Declaration that further helped indigenous people around the world.

    Bangladesh believes in helping indigenous people in Bangladesh and around the world. Bangladesh will continue to pursue the seventeen goals they agreed to achieve by 2030 through sustainable development. Bangladesh will still abide by what they signed on the Declaration of Rights for Indigenous Peoples. Bangladesh does believe that the United Nations should be able to intervene on other countries if other countries need help or their goals are not reached. Bangladesh believes other countries that have signed the Declaration of Rights for Indigenous Peoples and have agreed to sustainable development will agree with Bangladesh’s positions.

  • avatar image
    Dane Webb November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: DR Congo
    Committee: Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Issues
    Topic: Protecting Indigenous people
    Delegate: Dane Webb
    School: Williamston High School

    Protecting the rights of indigenous people inside of the DR Congo has always been and remains a challenge to this day. For some background, there are four main groups of indigenous peoples in the DR Congo The Mbuti, The Baka, The Batwa of the West and the Batwa of the east. There is no definite number of how many of these people there are in the DR Congo, as it is always a point of argument. The government estimates there to be about 600,000 indigenous peoples while civil society organizations argue that there are up to 2,000,000 of these peoples in the DR Congo. The life of these peoples is a nomadic life. These peoples are strewn about 10 of the 11 provinces in the country. These people live off the forest and it’s resources hunting and gathering. However, problems began to arise after logging began and the forest began shrinking. This forced many indigenous peoples out of their homes and their lifestyles of hunting and gathering shoving them into the edges of cities across the DR Congo leaving them no home and extreme poverty. Even further past that, many of these indigenous peoples are forced into manual labor due to discrimination and having no where else to turn. These peoples once being shoved into this new world, are also not given any formal training or education. And besides that, they have absolutely no health benefits. None of this seems to be changing either due to the very heavy discrimination these peoples receive on a daily basis. However, there does seem to be hope. Recently laws have been passed to encourage and help foster new conditions for these peoples. For example the 2002 Forest Code and the UN Declaration on the rights of peoples to which the DRC is a signatory. The plan of the DR Congo is to expand on these laws and build up walls protecting the rights of these people. We will build up their rights and also attempt to strike an agreement between these indigenous peoples and the countries that host them that allows these peoples to continue living with their traditions on their own land but with regards to the country they live in. The bottom line is that this problem is an issue that has been with many nations for far too long, and we will only stop it by expanding the rights of these citizens in their own countries.

  • Elenaluna
    Elenaluna November 13, 2018 Reply

    COMMITTEE: SocHum
    COUNTRY: People’s Republic of China
    TOPIC: The Rights of Indigenous People
    NAME: Elena Sofía Luna Palacio
    SCHOOL: Colegio Olinca

    Of the 370 million indigenous people around the world, 70% of them are from Asia. Just in China there are 56 recognized minority groups, there are 111,964,901 people; which represents 8.4% of the country’s population.

    Still to this day there are 640,101 people who haven’t been recognized by China’s government as a minority. This is due to the fact that a seat in parliament is given to a representative of each minority group, which wouldn’t be possible if more than 400 groups were recognized. China has always believed that if minorities learn Chinese and adapt to the Han culture, it will be easier for them to prosper in society. During several years The Republic of China has struggled with the Tibetan region, given the fact that they live under a completely different culture.

    Nowadays China endures certain problems regarding minority groups. First, it has been obligated to create boarding schools for people who have been influenced by Uyghurus extremist principles; this with the objective of giving psychological counseling, behavioral correction and Chinese learning courses. The Republic of China has never wanted a territorial disintegration.

    China believes that language is one important factor in identity. That is the reason why since several years back, China has implemented Chinese as the official language taught at school. This country believes in bilingual learning. Therefore, any other native language is taught in a specific class.

    The Republic of China has had an ongoing dispute concerning religion. As it says in its Constitution, China allows people to enjoy freedom of religious belief, although the government of China reserves the right to act accordingly if any religious practice disrupts the order in society.

    China also allows and encourages non-recognized minority groups to become legitimate under the government as long as it is a part of another recognized group. This in order for them to benefit from the concessions given by the government and China would be willing to give even more concessions to unrecognized minority groups. China will keep encouraging non-Chinese speaking areas such as Tibet to use Chinese as a main language, given its numerous advantages such as a better education and more opportunities for the future.

  • Luke.jaworsky
    Luke.jaworsky November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Brazil
    Committee: SocHum
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Protecting the rights of indigenous Peoples
    Delegate: Luke Jaworsky

    Throughout world history we have seen indigenous peoples having their land taken away from them by foreign powers as well as homes and even their lives. Hundreds of years later, their condition has improved but not well enough to where they can be fully protected from future harm. These people experience poverty on a large scale, and has very little political power to protect themselves from governments encroaching on their land. But, for the past twenty years progress has been made towards aiding indigenous peoples in the U.N. has been made but still more has been needed to combat this issue.
    Brazil has many economic assets within the Amazon rainforest currently, where many of these tribes are located. Some of these assets include hydroelectric dams, large mining in the Amazon, and clear cutting this land for logging and ranching with cattle. These aspects are beneficial for the growth and the development of our economy, as we are the second largest producer of beef in the world. In addition to these important economic ventures, these natives have violently resisted our government and many ranchers seeking economic fortune. In addition to these reasons Brazil’s indigenous people only make up .4% of its population and therefore do not need the attention that they have been given.
    Brazil would just like to simply state that any action proposed by the U.N. that would put an end to our economic expansion and ventures we would strongly disagree with. We also hope that many other nations like ourselves would work together to make sure that we are able to expand our horizons and reap the benefits of our hard work. Many of our nations are beyond the point of fixing the damage that has been done and all we can do now is to continue trying to push our nations towards economic prosperity as we have been doing.

  • Ethan
    Ethan November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: Republic of Moldova
    Committee: SOCHUM
    School: Williamston High School
    Topic: Protecting the rights of indigenous peoples
    Delegate: Ethan Briggs

    One of the biggest changes that has come to the modern world is the number of people who don’t affiliate themselves with a world government. These groups of people have origins that date back long before the creation of the committee we are in, and have coexisted with us for a much shorter time. But this doesn’t mean that they are always peaceful. Some groups have ideals that are seen as taboo, motives that frighten the masses; this has lead to a persecution of the ‘other’, and this persecution has lead to fatal instances. This by no means indicates that all indigenous people have suspicious backgrounds; rather, our opinions are based off of the worst of them. This view has made many people call for further restrictions on the rights of the indigenous, which makes these people push out more, creating a more negative view of themselves. This cycle has continued, and will keep on continuing until we do something to help those people by giving them more rights.
    The Republic of Moldova has done much to help the indigenous people of our country after our split from the former Soviet Union. We have begun a long campaign to bring rights to not just citizens of our country, but those that reside in our borders. Most of our indigenous people come from the ethnic diversity we have in our cities. Many of our citizens have a family line that is of a country that is near our borders, and we respect their choices do celebrate traditions of those people. One such ethnic group is Romanians. We treat them with respect, as it helps promote a sense of unity between ourselves and Romania. Many more of our people have family ties to Ukraine, and just with Romania, we respect their choice to have their own traditions. We have, however, taken actions against certain groups, as their ‘traditions’ have caused discontent among our citizens. We have done everything in our power to have everyone be safe, but is hard, as we have a failing economy, and without the European Union to support us, we don’t have the funds, or powers to combat those in an effective way, while also helping those that need to be protected from unruly citizens. Not only that, we have the lowest rate of tourism, in part due to the amount of ethnic diversity we have, which pushes away many would-be travellers.
    Moldova would like to see a new push for more rights for the many indigenous peoples of the world, but also having a restriction on how far these people can take their own ways of life. One plan that Moldova would like to see carried out would be more reservational land given to these people. Not just land that has been used as test sites for world-ending weapons; rather, land that is fertile enough for them to live on. We would also like to see more of a split between countries and indigenous people, as many conflicts come from the close proximity of citizens and those that aren’t. Moving them to more isolated locations might help relations between the two groups, as they will be able to live their own lives without interference without the other. Another solution that Moldova would be willing to see would be create special countries that would act as representatives to the indigenous people. These representatives would act as the ruling body for the land that the indigenous people lived on, and would work with the inhabitants to get more rights. All of these possibilities would suit what Moldova is looking to see in this committee, and would also help the many indigenous people gain rights that they have needed for many, many years.

  • SerenaUAE
    SerenaUAE November 13, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee (socHum)
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: United Arab Emirates (UAE)
    Delegate: Serena Ahmad

    While the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has caused progress to occur in several countries in formally recognizing indigenous peoples, steps still need to be taken to further fight the violence, the discrimination, the exclusion, and the poverty they continue to face. According to the United Nations, the world has an estimated 370 million indigenous people, living across 90 countries, who make up about one-third of the world’s 900 million “extremely poor”. The Declaration establishes minimum survival standards for the dignity and well-being of these indigenous peoples. Along with the existing Declaration, the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has launched the Local and Indigenous Knowledge Systems (LINKS) program in 2002. This program was created to support governments in creating synergies between scientific and indigenous peoples’ knowledge. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) appreciates these efforts to progress the overall issue.

    The United Arab Emirates is committed to the promotion and protection of human rights at home and around the world, and therefore supports the purpose of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The UAE reaffirms its commitment to reduce violence and discrimination against indigenous peoples. The UAE works with the Minority Rights Group International (MRG). The MRG,founded with the objective of working to secure rights for indigenous peoples, campaigns worldwide with around 130 partners in over 60 countries to ensure that disadvantaged minorities and indigenous peoples can make their voices heard.

    It is essential that countries continue to work together to implement indigenous peoples. The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) has been closely involved with the efforts to improve this issue. “We must make sure indigenous peoples’ rights and priorities are reflected in the implementation of the new [development] agenda,” UN DESA’s Under-Secretary-General Wu Hongbo said as he addressed a panel event at the 2014 World Conference. The UAE calls upon the international community to focus on the priorities of improving conditions for indigenous peoples worldwide. One major priority is to strengthen informed public education and awareness of the growing obstacles for indigenous peoples. The UAE also plans to fulfill wider rights and work to create conditions favourable to a people’s development. As it is in the best interest of the international community, support would be very appreciated in this attempt to progress rights of indigenous peoples. Funding from non-governmental organizations will ease the burden that would have been placed upon the countries involved in this mission.

  • YourLordGeorge
    YourLordGeorge November 13, 2018 Reply

    SocHum
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Uruguay
    George Khamis

    Rights of indigenous peoples remain a crucial topic in the world. The protection of indigenous is an important problem that demands a resolution. In the past, peoples of indigenous culture and background have been discriminated against in there distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions. Indigenous peoples are hindered in most countries, and they are unable to receive a full citizenship, vote or participate in government activities. For example, Although the UN has extended numerous rights to indigenous peoples, such as laws, and programs to help establish a frontier for indigenous rights, governments continue to violate these rights and curb indigenous communities’ right to protest. The SDG, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth. Additionally the UN charter, which is the fundamental treaty that declares to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom. These two organizations cooperated in solving the curbing of indigenous rights across all countries and solving international problems for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion. Furthermore, the United Nations must discontinue the illegal curbing and hinder of indigenous peoples rights, so the governments of countries will not cease to lessen.

    As a country that pledged to ratify the ILO 169 Convention, Uruguay is determined to end the discriminating factors held against its indigenous and tribal people to protect their rights. Andrés Scagliola, a Uruguay government spokesperson, told the UN, “Our failure to ratify the Convention thus far shows that the State is not a rational and unified entity, but one that contradicts itself when faced with a painful past, because it is difficult to accept our long history of bloodshed and the oblivion that buried it afterward,” Uruguay used to treat indigenous peoples harshly and unjust, however Uruguay atoned for their actions and now they definitely urge the UN to abolish all civil injustices placed on indigenous peoples. It is predominant to the rights and society to maintain a strong infrastructure based on the unity of all peoples and the collaboration of them rather than impinging on their freedoms, and Uruguay wholeheartedly believes that a unified nation is a better nation.

    Uruguay proposes that the United Nations rule curbing and hindering of indigenous peoples rights illegal. In a country where indigenous peoples accumulate 5% of the total population, Uruguay wholeheartedly believes in national unity. Uruguay further believes that more international laws such as the ILO 169 Convention should be put in place to protect and uphold the rights of indigenous peoples. It is important that the Social, Humanitarian and Cultural committee maintains a level position based upon unity in a country and to prevent the immoral actions fulfilled by governments with no unity across the world. Uruguay requests a resolution that protects indigenous rights within a nation will terminate injustices placed on these peoples and ultimately provide a more unifying and globally accepting world. Additionally, Uruguay wants the UN to create more laws and conventions in place to protect indigenous peoples rights, and that all further laws and conventions will be enforced and implemented into all governments across the world.

  • avatar image
    Eli Duguid November 13, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social Humanities
    Topic: Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: Germany

    Since the beginning of the colonial period, indigenous people have been oppressed by those peoples who have annexed the territory. The oppression of Indigenous people has been shown throughout history, especially in the way Europeans and Americans had treated people native to America, Africa, and Asia during the colonial and imperialist ages spanning from the 15th to 19th century. After the days of imperialism, many indigenous people around the world have had less opportunities and rights than the general public. Since the development of the United Nations, many attempts have been made by the General Assembly to end the ill-treatment of indigenous people; these attempts have fallen short, leading to a much needed update to the resolutions at hand. Germany wishes to work hard on these resolutions and uphold the rights given to all peoples around the world.
    In Germany we have developed a strategy to guarantee and promote the rights of Indigenous peoples through the Strategy on Human Rights in German Development Policy. This policy recognizes and addresses the challenges Indigenous people face when attempting to acquire land and practice their culture. Since this policy has been passed, the German people have recognized and supported the International effort to give more rights to indigenous people across the world. Germany has also led global efforts to guarantee rights to Indigenous people in the UN and through foreign policy. Germany has strongly supported the United Nations’ Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and has recognized the important precedent this resolution has set to guaranteeing the rights deserved to these peoples. In the years following the adoption of this resolution, Germany has worked hard to promote the enforcement of this resolution across the world.
    In the opinion of the German people, the United Nations’ Declarations on the Rights of Indigenous peoples should be upheld, with a few simple revisions. These revisions should include clearly defined provisions regarding how nations should compensate these Indigenous peoples; with the hope more nations will enforce this resolution in their domestic policy. Germany is a part of the: European Union, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and is looking forward to work with any willing nations to develop a resolution that solves the problem at hand.

  • Matthewwedeven
    Matthewwedeven November 13, 2018 Reply

    Social Humanitarian Cultural Committee
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Kuwait
    Matthew Wedeven

    Indigenous peoples are populations that have been unable to assimilate into a country following the development of new territories. In past years, the United Nations have honed their focus toward protecting indigenous people. For instance, in 1982, ECOSOC built the foundation for protecting them and in 2007 the General Assembly addressed and set a precedent for how they are to be protected and cared for worldwide. Appropriate treatment of indigenous peoples must come to a common understanding, however, the agreement must reach a decision that provides polar results. The protection of people remains to be a pivotal question that the SocHum Committee must address. In order to make peace, countries must come to an agreement revolving around requirements for treatment of indigenous peoples due to the
    land and resources required to house and take care of such people.

    As Kuwait secured its independence from Britain in 1961, many people of nomadic tribes called Bidoons had not registered as citizens of Kuwait, however, they remained located on the territory. Through the following decades, Kuwait has provided the necessary resources for their protection such as education in public schools, employment, free health care, and voting rights – parallel to the rights of Kuwaiti citizens. After the late 1980’s, the Iranian War and an economic upheaval led to the decision to cut off the costly government securities to the “illegal citizens”, previously known as Bidoons. Although Kuwait has issued a desire to provide citizenship to those illegal citizens who had heritage on territory prior to 1962, barely more than 30,000 applied, displaying the remaining 100,000 as illegal. The Kuwaiti government does not support the act of providing resources to illegal citizens in a country’s territory, however, when outside of the country, the decision is subject to change.

    Kuwait urges that the United Nations altars their previous rulings that frown upon a countries treatment of such illegal citizens. In a country riddled with poverty and issues concerning our own population, Kuwait refuses to aid illegal citizens that are located on Kuwaiti territory and understands the economic issues that are derived from directing aid toward them. As stated previously, the Kuwaiti government has provided citizenship to those located on our lands prior to the revolution, however, the 100,000 located on Kuwaiti territory have not been here before us, thereby are illegal, which imposes reason for change amidst the current United Nations agreement. Upon the change, countries must not be required to provide the economic, medical, and schooling benefits to indigenous peoples that are provided to actual citizens.

  • Cwilliams160
    Cwilliams160 November 13, 2018 Reply

    SocHum
    Protecting the rights of Indigenous People
    Nigeria
    Connor Williams

    In the past the UN has pushed to protect the rights of indigenous people around the world. Regardless of these past efforts to protect these peoples rights governments still continue to harass the rights of these indigenous people with no consequences to this. Issues regarding these problems are rising across the globe and further action must be taken.
    In Nigeria indigenous people make up a bulk of the population so this is very important to Nigeria. The mistreatment of Nigeria’s indigenous people has been going on for a while with one in 1976-1991 where the Royal Dutch/Shell were the people behind the mass of oil spills in this fifteen year period. When the Ogoni people tried to speak out they were aggressively suppressed by the government. Nigeria’s indigenous people are finding it hard to find a place in the Nigerian federation with them getting pushed out for development schemes, military bases, and other ill conceived things. Also indigenous peoples educational rights are being abused as well. Under the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which in Article 14 states that “Indigenous peoples have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.”. Even with this in place out of the 10 million out of school children in Nigeria a vast majority are indigenous children who live in the hinterlands with no access to education and basic things in life.
    Nigeria is highly in favor of protecting the basic human rights of these indigenous people which includes easy access to education for the indigenous children. Nigeria believes a better system should be put in place to make sure that these rights are being protected and that no government or large corporation can silence the voices of these people. The culture of Nigeria is a prized possession of ours and with that comes the culture of all of our people, especially that of the indigenous people.

  • AbbyVan
    AbbyVan November 13, 2018 Reply

    Country: India
    Committee: SOCHUM
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    School: Royal Oak High School
    Delegate: Abigail VanHaitsma

    The issue of Indigenous Peoples’ rights being violated is still one that plagues our world to this day. There is not one country that is exempt from this topic, or from being part of the problem and solution. The nation of India recognizes the atrocities that have been committed against its own Scheduled Tribes, as well as against the entire five percent of the world’s population. Although that percentage may be small, the crimes committed against them are not, and we as a committee must work together to end this behavior.
    It is vital that the committee is fully aware of the rights given to every Indigenous person through the United Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People. This resolution was passed with only four objections, implying that the majority of this committee should be in agreement about the proper treatment that these people should receive. India agreed to these terms, so we, as well as all other agreeing nations, should be held accountable for holding to these conditions. This is the first thing that needs to be addressed by the committee; making sure that all nations are held accountable, and following through with the promises they make in regards to their own people.
    A second item for the agenda is addressing the protests by Indigenous groups. India agrees that these people should be given a stronger voice in government, and more representation, however, the multiple protests are only postponing this goal. If we are to have successful dialogue, and achieve equality for these people, we need to minimize these protests. There have been many cases in which these protests have turned violent quickly, and are causing more harm than good. For this reason, there needs to be restrictions on how these protests can take place. This is not an effort to limit the voice of these people, it is merely an effort to limit the amount of riots and violence that come as a result of these protests.
    A third item for discussion is the concept of land ownership. It is clearly stated in Article 10 of the UNRIP that, “Indigenous peoples shall not be forcibly removed from their lands or
    Territories.” It is stated here, yet it continues to be violated time and time again. The Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, made the elimination of the allocation of native land to anyone other than indigenous people one of his key campaign points when he was running for the office of Prime Minister. This is one of many examples of how governments can take steps to help protect their native populations, and ensure that they have their rights.
    These three items, and so many more, are key issues to discuss and resolve throughout the course of committee. How can we say that we are united when there is a whole sector of our population that is being stripped of their voice and of their rights? This topic should be of high priority, and is important to debate if we are to move forward.

  • Lucas-Ca
    Lucas-Ca November 14, 2018 Reply

    Camden Lucas
    Commonwealth of Australia
    SocHum
    City High Middle School

    The governments of Australia, over time, have had a highly complex relationship with the indigenous peoples of its own continent. The first known instance of a foreign government in Australia is in 1788 when the First Fleet arrives from England in response to the 1770 declaration by Captain James Cook that the land was “terra nullius,”– belonging to nobody. This fleet founded a settlement in what is now New South Wales. The settlement had great impact on the surrounding native peoples in the following years: deaths from diseases, wars, and forcible removals from land occurred.1

    Throughout the 1800s the British spread widely about Australia. In many areas present relations existed, however a projected 3 in every 4 native Australians did not survive this rapid colonization. In 1835 an explorer by the name of John Batman attempted to negotiate a treaty to buy land from a group of natives. The British governor of Australia did not recognize said treaty. In 1837 a ruling was made by a committee of the British House of Commons that the natives had a ‘plain right and sacred right’ to the land.1

    In the 1900s the Australian colonies federate. During this time armed resistance decreases and in turn their populations increase. The government ‘protects’ the native peoples: the states each enact laws granting themselves complete control over the lives of the natives and cause their young to be under the responsibility of the state, allowing them to take the natives’ children at any moment without permission. During the second world war many children were stolen from the natives to be raised as ‘Australians’. In 1925, an organization known as the Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association is formed, garnering support for native rights. Though at the state level they continue to be discriminated against, in 1948 they are granted, along with all other Australians, Australian citizenship. In 1962 they gain the right to vote in federal elections.1 In 1967 a constitutional referendum to the constitution allowed indigenous peoples to be counted in the census and to have laws applied equally to them.2

    The 1970s mark the creation of a Department of Aboriginal Affairs, the Senate unanimously is in favour of a resolution acknowledging the prior ownership of the country, and the Racial Discrimination Act. In 1988 the Prime Minister of Australia is shown two paintings and a text calling for indigenous rights at a festival in Barunga. He then responded saying that there would be a treaty within the lifetime of this Parliament. 1992 marked the Redfern Address, a speech that accrued much support from the non-Indigenous peoples of the rights of the Aborigines. In the same year a High Court decision(known as the Mabo decision) declared that at the time of Cook the country was not ‘terra nullius’.1

    Overturning its previous objections to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, Australia announces their support for the document in 2009.[1] In 2015 a Guidance Note is published by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation delineating ways media sources can respect the cultural practices of natives.3

    In present-day Australia there are threats to the ecosystems the natives inhabit from both settlers and climate change. The government has stated it is against said settling. Australia is against the natives being considered a separate state but rather supports their self-determination and self-government within the existing country of Australia. A great deal of progress has been made in Australia throughout its history in protecting the rights of its indigenous peoples, however recently Australia has done several things to erode their rights, such as a recent Court dismissal of a challenge in protest to the construction of a mine on Aboriginal land⁴, a historical example being of British nuclear tests with support from the Australian government between 1956 and 1963 that displaced many natives⁵. This leads me to the conclusion that the Australian government externally wishes to be seen as in support of the protection of the rights of Indigenous peoples, but internally wishes to erode their rights for economic gain. Another important point to consider in my portrayal of Australia is that the United States CIA once assisted Britain in the firing of the government of Queensland the last time Australia disagreed with the United States on an issue⁶ so following the United States may be in Australia’s interests.

    Endnotes and Bibliography: https://pastebin.com/miUwhYkU

  • LukeWassink
    LukeWassink November 14, 2018 Reply

    SocHum
    Protecting the Right of Indigenous Peoples
    Ukraine
    Luke Wassink

    The rights of indigenous people are oftentimes trampled, even in this day and age. Ukraine is fortunate enough not to have major issues in Ukraine, as there are few indigenous peoples in Ukraine. Other nations often must balance the rights of indigenous peoples with national sovereignty, and this oftentimes implies conflict over borders and land. Rights of indigenous people are an extension of national sovereignty, and the United Nations must recognize the hypocrisy in ensuring national sovereignty while also denying the rights of indigenous people and their nations.

    While not as relevant to Ukraine as to other, much larger nations, Ukraine cares deeply about the rights of indigenous people around the world. A former entity within the Soviet Union, Ukraine has had an issue with a large power exerting influence over a much smaller nation. While Ukraine has peoples of various ethnicities and nationality, different languages and cultures, sovereign states within Ukraine do not exist as they do in countries with much larger tribal powers. Ukraine recognizes the Crimean Tatars in the Crimean peninsula, but following the Russian annexation, no longer has military control over such. As a result, the Crimean Tatars have had to sacrifice freedom. Ukraine abstained during the passing of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, but has endorsed it recently in response to the annexation of the Crimean Peninsula. The rights of indigenous peoples to Ukraine reflects the rights of smaller nations, nations that fall victim to those larger ones. Indeed, indigenous people must struggle for their sovereignty and independence from a much larger, much more intrusive power. Crimean Tatars are strongly opposed to the Russian occupation as well, meaning that while Ukraine recognized the group and protected them, Russia has neglected them. This has brought about their opposition to the annexation and has led to increased conflict in the region. Clearly, Russian not only violated Ukraine’s national sovereignty but also violate the rights of the indigenous group in the region.

    The Russian aggression mirrors that of aggression towards indigenous people, and for that reason, Ukraine is supportive of any resolution that tackles larger country’s efforts to influence smaller, neighboring nations. Ukraine sees the UN as an institution that should, at least to some degree, deter acts of aggression towards smaller nations. Given its failure to address the annexation of Crimea in 2014, Ukraine is able to recognize the importance of protecting the rights of indigenous peoples.

  • Taegan
    Taegan November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social, Cultural, Humanitarian Committee
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Mexico
    Taegan Long

    Indigenous people are arguably among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable groups of people in the world. Indigenous people have sought recognition for their way of life and culture and protection of their traditional land, but governments have taken active roles in repressing Indigenous Peoples’ rights. There are approximately 370 million Indigenous people in over 90 countries, with 5% of the global population made up of Indigenous people, and 15% of them living in extreme poverty. It is estimated that 65% of the world’s land is under indigenous customary ownership, yet many governments recognize only a fraction of this land as formally or legally belonging to Indigenous Peoples. Mexico has one of the largest Indigenous populations in Latin America; its indigenous population is 12.7 million people, which represents 13% of the national population. Although the country has recognized the existence of and contributions made by indigenous peoples in the construction of the country, it was only with the 1992 Constitution that the nation was deemed pluricultural. The issue of Indigenous Peoples’ rights has come to light recently following the release of the report by the Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples released in September of 2018.

    As a country with a large indigenous population, Mexico understands the importance of protecting the rights of indigenous people. The Mexican Constitution grants the indigenous people self-determination and autonomy. Self-determination allows them the right to education and infrastructure. Autonomy allows them the right to participate in economic, political, cultural, and legal decision-making associated with the state. This change to the constitution followed the Zapatista uprising, where the indigenous people of Mexico declared war of the Mexican government and demanded work, housing, food, health, education, independence, liberty, democracy, justice, and peace. With the signing of the San Andres Peace Accords, an agreement between the indigenous Zapatistas and the Mexican government, peace was being made as the government responded to the demand for indigenous rights and culture. The issue in Mexico falls on the states, where their state constitutions allow them to establish new legislation that can limit the rights of the indigenous people. As a consequence, the protection of indigenous people’s rights varies greatly from state to state. While some states have established a wide range of policies aiming at the promotion of indigenous peoples’ rights, others have not developed an institutional framework. Working with increased political support for the implementation of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a matter of central concern for Mexico. However, trouble arises because the indigenous people do know about the declaration, and do not understand the impact the declaration will have on them. To ensure the participation and inclusion of indigenous peoples in the public policies of the government, the National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples had an advisory board comprised 140 counselors representing the indigenous peoples of Mexico. Mexico also supported the extension of the mandate of the Voluntary Fund of the United Nations for indigenous peoples, which would provide financial assistance to indigenous representatives so that they can participate in UN conferences.

    Mexico urges countries to implement, not proclaim, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples to further advance the protection of indigenous people. While in Mexico, there are still violations of indigenous liberties and rights, the government is working to ensure that the rights of indigenous peoples are enforced throughout the country, especially in regions with conflict. The Mexican government has also called upon its states to address the social gaps that separate the indigenous from the people, in an attempt of national development. Mexico also recommends Infrastructure Programs, such as the ones we have developed to provide communities with drainage, electricity, clean water, shelter, and other basic services. The Mexican government has also issued birth certificates to indigenous children that had no legal identity. The issue of birth certificates helps legally identify citizens that would otherwise remain invisible to society and the government because they lack documentation that identifies them as Mexican. The government hopes this will allow indigenous people to enforce their rights as citizens. In order to protect the rights of indigenous people, the government must protect their citizens, and in order to do so, the indigenous people must become more interwoven into society.

  • JoshuaMuldoon
    JoshuaMuldoon November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Issues

    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

    Pakistan

    Joshua Muldoon

    Pakistan believes that the issue of protecting the rights of indigenous peoples is very important as their country experiences this injustice through the effects of climate change and commercial profit. Indigenous People from around the world have been suffering massively from their loss of population. Indigenous People make up about 5% of the world’s population- 370 million- but make up 15% of the world’s poverty. Pakistan can tell that in many countries that Indigenous People are constantly taken advantage of, and in many countries have no opportunity to speak up for themselves or others, resulting in less public awareness to the issues at hand. Pakistan is trying to solve this social issue.

    Pakistan believes that the issue at hand is a deep concern to their country. It is an issue that Pakistan is trying to curb and are calling for other nations help to solve. Pakistan has called for help in order to tame the Northern-Pakistan decrease in population that is putting many Indigenous People at risk. Pakistan has been supporting the Indigenous People Survival Foundation, a foundation that they are apart of, in their efforts to eradicate the problem, and have been calling on the UN as a whole to support the safeguarding of countries against these problems. Pakistan’s efforts haven’t gone unnoticed, as they have had the UN secure human rights and freedoms to all Indigenous People in hope for more equal treatment and hopefully help solve the problem.

    Pakistan recommends the UN as a whole to take a longer look at the issues that are plaguing these people as a whole and to see whether they can come up with a solution that will work in the long run. Pakistan cannot stand by as a country and see these atrocities happen around the globe and expect things to just get better. If the UN can’t stand up for the Indigenous People rights and try their best to secure their rights, then countries around the world will be getting a free pass in order to commit mass atrocities in their own countries without any consequences. Pakistan cannot let that happen, which is why Pakistan and other countries need to act quickly in standing up for their citizens or else they may lose a large portion of their Indigenous Peoples. A resolution that aims to curb the effects of climate change and commercial profit in areas that Indigenous People live in would go a long way in fixing this issue.

  • Livyw
    Livyw November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social, Humanitarian and Cultural
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    El Salvador
    Olivia Wolfe

    While indigenous people only make up 5% of the world’s population, they make up around 15% of the poorest. Due to political, geographical and historical oppression it has been found that Indigenous people are stuck in a “poverty trap”. Due to these factors and widespread discrimination against indigenous peoples it has become hard for them to escape poverty. Along with poverty Indigenous people are showing that they still face systemic discrimination and exclusion from political and economic power. Many are being forced from their ancestral grounds, and are dealing with large corporations destroying their forests and lands. Despite past horrors against indigenous people on El Salvador’s soil, since 2010 El Salvador’s government has begun to implement major changes for indigenous people. El Salvador still faces certain problems with discrimination against indigenous people.

    El Salvador’s government has reiterated its determination to strengthen international structures, in order to further address the historic challenges involving indigenous peoples. Decades ago there was an attempt to create a form of congress for indigenous people but it was rejected and never succeeded. Indigenous people had to go into hiding, they would change their names and change the way they dressed. Since then the current government has successfully created its first National Indigenous Congress addressing the needs and problems indigenous people face. The government is now asking for forgiveness and hopes to make up for the prosecution of past indigenous people throughout El Salvadorian history.

    Despite a rough past for indigenous people, as of 2010 El Salvador’s governing body plans to embrace its multicultural nation and heritage. We hope to take pride in this newly found rich culture and inclusion of Indigenous peoples. We are also starting to widely promote the rehabilitation of indigenous languages and training on the rights of indigenous peoples. El Salvador, paying close attention to the indigenous cultures, languages and beliefs, have created a social inclusion secretariat, to help create better conditions for indigenous peoples. As a nation we encourage the Un to expand its already annual conferences that provide expert recommendations and advice on indigenous issues to the Council. We would also like to help change the conditions in which indigenous people suffer in other countries, with the help of the UN.

  • avatar image
    Jared Rhein November 14, 2018 Reply

    The Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Philippines
    Jared Rhein

    Rights of people in the modern world are cherished in developed countries. Proof of this statement is within the constitutions of developed nations and the governments of which they molded to protect their citizens. The Philippines has trouble with rights to native land, there are constant disputes among the growing economy and more need defined ownership of land on tiny islands. The Philippines does not care about Indigenous Rights as a country, the Philippines care about modern issues of economics. The natives’ land has origins that have been passed from the conquerings of the Spanish, Japanese, and the Americans. The natives’ land is steep, mountains of the stretched Sierra Madre to the iconic beacon, Mount Apo, reaching 9,692 feet. These mountains and high regions once isolated now pose an obstacle because of the need for land along with hazy borders that have been modified through each invasion, variances from Spanish to American(1521-1898).

    Protecting indigenous rights in the Philippines are regarded with no emphasis since the indigenous people ultimately steal land that they claim is theirs. My country has enacted the “Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Act of 1997.” This act gave indigenous people right they “lost”. That act was passed in the term of President Fidel V. Ramos(92’-98’), not Rodrigo Duterte(16’-present). The Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA) and Philippine Task Force for Indigenous Peoples’ Rights (TFIP). This act was also passed to give rights to indigenous people because there were petitions and marches to gain them.

    Additionally, the Philippines moves to inform the UN not to pursue a verdict due to the increasing relations to this day. Relations with countries who also be a benefit to counteract any sanctions being put on the Philippines or countries with the same views. The Filipino government does not care about indigenous peoples because of the problems they pose with their claimed land that has no economic payment attached.

  • avatar image
    Elliot Baker November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social, Humanitarian & Cultural
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: United States of America
    Delegate: Elliot Baker

    Since colonialism first appeared, indigenous peoples have been oppressed and marginalized. The native peoples faced enslavement then and even now face discrimination as well as disproportionately high poverty rates. The United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007, as a non-binding document that establishes the rights of indigenous peoples as self-determined entities. While the United States initially voted against the declaration, its position is now in favor of the declaration and supports efforts to preserve indigenous cultures and communities.
    According to United States 2010 census information, 2.9 million people in the US identify as Native American or Alaska Native alone, with 573 tribes recognized by the United States’ Bureau of Indian Affairs. While the United States has had unfavorable relations with the indigenous peoples in the past, not allowing natives to vote in elections and forcing assimilation into mainstream American culture. Since then, however, the United States’ policies toward Native Americans have grown increasingly supportive towards improving and repairing the relationships between native communities and the federal government. In 2010, the United States reversed its position on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and in 2016, it adopted the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples under the Organization of American States. The US also provides government aid to impoverished native peoples on reservations and provides scholarships to Native American students.
    The United States believes that the rights of indigenous peoples should be protected and that a degree of self-government should be granted, but maintains that indigenous peoples do not have the rights to traditionally occupied lands or traditionally used resources. Indigenous peoples should exist as distinct collectives with protected rights and freedoms, and the United Nations should make continued efforts to establish guidelines and ideals on the rights of these peoples.
    The United States would support legislation aiming to preserve indigenous cultures without enforcing indigenous peoples’ right to land and resources. The delegation from the United States looks forward to working with its fellow delegations and hopes that the issues facing indigenous peoples can be addressed and that their rights continue to be protected.

  • Faithschafer
    Faithschafer November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    Committee: Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Delegate: Faith Schafer
    School: Williamston High School

    It has been eleven years since the United Nations passed the United Nations Declaration
    on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and many countries have relaxed their efforts to help out this portion of the world’s population. They have been stifling the voices of this group that often lacks the resources to help themselves and therefore, have pushed them deeper into poverty while purloining the lands and resources they have relied on for their survival. Indigenous groups that decide to protest and vouch for the rights that have been laid out for their people in previous UN declarations have been silenced by governments around the world, and it is high time that our global society extend a helping hand to these people. As the Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee, it is our responsibility to remind the world of the rules we have laid out to protect the rights of all people around the world and ensure that every voice of every person is being heard.
    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland does not recognise any indigenous peoples within their country, though the country still has ties to the Commonwealth Nations, many of which have large populations of indigenous peoples. The United Kingdom has dealt with native peoples of lands multiple times throughout their varied history and now considers the task of creating laws for each native group the responsibility of the government in which said groups reside. There should be a standard, however- all people and their basic rights deserve to be protected and safe, and their property deserves the same level of respect. Many of the conflicts between native groups and the country in which they are located arise because of promises made to them in regard to their land rights, which are oftentimes not respected. Events that arise, such as past conflicts that the UK has had with many of its former colonies, especially Australia, have always been long and often bloody, stemming from a misunderstanding between the two systems of government. The United Kingdom has learned through past actions that the indigenous peoples are more satisfied when there is not such a large divide between the policy put in place to protect the lands of the native peoples and the actual practising of the situation, and the key way to achieve such a balance that provides a thorough understanding is to ensure that both governments are on the same level in regard to information and respect.
    While this is undoubtedly an issue that needs to be addressed by the United Nations, the bigger picture should be approached on a government-to-government basis, where the leaders of the country and the leaders of the native peoples meet and create a friendly compromise that both sides can agree on. This will create a way to be sure that policies are actually being implemented and followed through, rather than creating a solution and doing nothing to work towards it. The United Kingdom is happy to help out the countries that struggle with balancing their needs of their economy and the other people in the country as well as the indigenous population, primarily in the form of sending aid and resources to the indigenous peoples. This will help them to access healthcare services and education, but the bigger step must be taken by the countries who house large populations of native peoples. While it is important that the native lands are restored to the peoples who rely on them, it creates a problematic situation when that land is being used for the good of the country and all its inhabitants, and the only groups that can deal with the problem are the two opposing sides. Realistically, this is all the committee can do. The body has already created a declaration that defines the rights of the indigenous peoples and requests that the individual governments comply with the rules, but if they don’t, and as long as they do not trample on the standards for human rights, there is not much that the committee can do.

  • 22EilerJu
    22EilerJu November 14, 2018 Reply

    Country: Belgium
    Committee: Sochum
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People.
    Delegate: Julia Eiler
    School: Williamston High School

    Belgium recognizes that Protecting the rights of indigenous people is a very important subject because they make up 15% of the people experiencing poverty globally. Although indigenous people only consists of 5% of the population of the world. In 2007, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous people. This guarantees Indigenous Peoples the right ¨to the full enjoyment, as a collective or as individuals, of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.¨

    Belgium has many different cultures, religions and speaks many different languages. The main religion is Roman Catholicism and the main languages spoken are Dutch, French, and German. In 1962 the cultural and linguistic border was drawn for the first time between the Flemish and French-speaking areas. In 1963 language laws established Flemish (Dutch), French and German as the official languages for their geographical areas. When the Constitution was amended in 1970 it set up three cultural communities Flemish, French-speaking and German-speaking. Three regions Flanders, Brussels, and Wallion. The change in the constitution provided guarantees for the French-speaking minority, in the national parliament was up into groups and two main groups, French and Flemish, to alter laws the rights of people. The main political parties, Christian Democrat, Liberal Democrat, and Socialist, like the United States in 1901. In order to try and help to put this action into place Belgium has signed; Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious or Linguistic Minorities in 1992, and Proposed American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 1997.

    Belgium is addressing problems such as; identity and self-determination, participation in decision-making processes, discrimination and inequality, and the relation between land and housing. Belgium would like to see more movement on this issue. The 1831 constitution guarantees basic human rights, freedoms, and equality before the law. The different language committees have been recognized in the constitution from the, and with later amendments setting up political structures to protect their rights. The federal level still remains responsible for immigration, asylum policy, and deporting. Belgium is addressing poverty, ensuring housing adequacy, urban housing, violence against women, and forced evictions.

  • Sarahwordhouse
    Sarahwordhouse November 14, 2018 Reply

    Sarah Wordhouse
    Committee: SocHum
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: Poland

    Before Wolrd War II, there were approximately 1 million ethnic Germans who lived in Poland, making up around 3.5 of the population. The conclusion of the war led to the disposition to the of tens to hundreds of thousands of deaths of Germans caused by Poland and the surrounding countries expelling them from their land during 1945-1949. After this, around 250,000 Germans remained in Poland. Then, in around 1960, Poland denied German minorities inside its borders. However, in 1989, the normalization of relations between Poland and West Germany commenced. Germans were now able to reassert their ethnic identity inside of Poland. The Polish-German Treaty of Good Neighbourhood and Cooperation, signed in July 1991, states the allowance of ethnic Germans “‘freely to express, preserve and develop their ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious identity, both individually and collectively,’”’ (United Nations. (2018, March). While Poland has given rights back to the German minority, Poland wishes to now receive the same.
    Today, Berlin is not fond of returning the minority status of German Poles. Even after the signed “Good Neighbor Treaty,’ there still remains some “asymmetry” amongst the countries. While roles for Germans increased with added benefits of minority status, which includes financial aid, lifting the 5% threshold to get into parliament, as well as bilingual signs, ethnic Poles have not revied any of this same treatment from Germany. Poles in Germany now face poverty and are designated the roles of “beggars,” (CYWIŃSKI, P. (2016, June 30).
    Because Poles do not have a minority status in Germany, therefore they are given limited rights. This taking away of rights was caused by the invasion of Nazi-Germany in Poland and was liquidated in February of 1940. Since then, The German Ambassador in Poland Guenther Knackstedt has written that “For the first time since World War II, the German minority has not only been formally recognized but it has also been given legal guarantees allowing for its development on native lands. In addition to this, the treaty designates a special bridge function to the German minority living in Poland as well as to people of Polish origin who live in Germany.” This can lead to the assumption that ethnic Germans are well treated in Poland today but the same cannot be said vice versa.
    With all this being stated, Poland believes that Germans are given a minority status in Poland, but we would like to receive the same in Germany. It seems only fair that the relationship would be reciprocal, and because of the invasion of Poland by Germany which displaced people same Poland later did to Germans in retaiation, there should be equal standards set in place. Poland would support a resolution that protects ethnicities and minorities of countries such as non-discriminatory voting in office and tax benefits, as these are what is received from our German Poles counterparts. We believe that there should be equality given for minority status, and would be willing to work with multiple countries including Germany to help resolve these issues.

    References
    CYWIŃSKI, P. (2016, June 30). The Asymmetry of Polish-German relations. Retrieved from https://polska.pl/politics/foreign-affairs/asymmetry-polish-german-relations/
    United Nations. (2018, March). World Directory of Minorities and Indigenous Peoples – Poland: Germans. Retrieved from http://www.refworld.org/docid/49749cc9c.html

  • Saramvarg
    Saramvarg November 14, 2018 Reply

    Sara Michelle Vargas
    SOCHUM
    Protecting The Rights of Indigenous People
    Canada

    370 million indigenous people. 5,00 tribes. 90 countries. Men, women, children with watering eyes and naked bodies. Top it off with 78% of their population diagnosed with depression. Indigenous people, according to Survival People, are in every region of the world. They are a part of the dominant post-colonial culture with “their own language, cultures, and traditions”. But, Indigenous people are negatively affected by innovations, changes, and savageries of the modern world. Their personal traditions and customs are being stripped along with their land. As their traditions and customs are invaded, their identity and purpose for existence erodes. Piece by piece, square mile by mile, the innocent indigenous people become nomads in a land they used to call home. Sir John A. Macdonald wrote a carefully researched book about Canada’s negative contribution to the indigenous people lives. Early on in his research he realized that “you could look at poor health outcomes [of the indigenous people] almost as a measure of oppression and marginalization. Today, Canada acknowledges our mistakes.

    The Indigenous people’s rights to comfort and ability to practice cultural traditions is suppressed insidiously. Canada is “no land of wonders”, imperfect in the way that we address the suppressions of our indigenous people: 600 tribes of within Canada, and 1,172,198 individuals underrepresented and left to eat the scraps of Canadian colonialism. Although, we are angry with the actions of our government, and its abandoned promises for lasting change: Canada can’t allow the continued spread of this hellenic disease of undermined torture towards indigenous people – in our lands or beyond. Canada has a policy of inclusivity. We care about the people who are suppressed and we desire to meet each segment of our population’s needs, but with little stress deriving from the mouths of our people into the seat of the government- little change has permeated. The problem is considered in our parliamentary government, but not seen through. The people continue to suffer and Canada waits to hear the voices of the people. But as a country with a 3 billion dollar deficit, our economy does not particularly benefit from losing land to the indigenous people. Do we care? Yes. But economically, Canada calls upon other nations to help Canada during this time of trial: to help us help alleviate the suppression of indigenous people through monetary aid.

    Canada proposes a three step process to solve the issue of unprotected indigenous people rights: 1. Mass Media Propaganda advertising Ad Nauseum the issue to the public to increase population awareness.
    2. Taxation to raise money for the indigenous people.
    3. Cultural fairs outside of Quebec- Yearly cultural events that center around the indigenous people and their contributions to our post-colonial lands.
    In addition to these three steps of advertisement and acknowledgement, for lasting change to occur, it must derive from the government.With this said, Canada calls upon the United Nations to gather additional ideas that pertain to law enforcing details of indigenous rights and come together on a global solution. Canada believes that through these proposed steps, and with the support of other countries of the United Nations, indigenous peoples rights will increase sufficiently.

  • Joeheitmeier
    Joeheitmeier November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social Cultural Humanitarian
    Rights of Indigenous People
    The Republic of Uganda
    Joe Heitmeier

    Often overlooked during the process of colonization, the human rights of indigenous people all across the globe have been systematically oppressed since the beginning of expansion. As activists for indigenous rights have become increasingly repressed, a call for nations to protect their indigenous populations and their personal liberties has been made. The Republic of Uganda (hereafter Uganda) has no formal legislation that protects the rights of its indigenous people, and thus is not as interested in this call as other delegations.

    Uganda’s indigenous population consists of traditional hunter/gatherer communities and pastoralists. Hunter-gatherers include the Benet (around 20,000 people), and the Batwa (around 6,700 people). Pastoralists include the Ik (around 1,600 people), and the Karamojong (around 988,429 people). None of these indigenous population groups are specifically recognized as indigenous by the Ugandan government, and all of these communities have a similar past of state-induced landlessness and historical injustices caused by the creation of conservation areas in Uganda. Forced evictions, exclusions from ancestral lands without proper compensation, and violence and restriction towards indigenous subsistence are common themes. The indigenous people of Uganda are protected only under Article 32 to the 1995 Constitution which places a mandatory duty on the state to take affirmative action in favor of groups that have been historically disadvantaged. However, this provision is meant to protect women and children and thus is not implemented as often in the situation of indigenous rights violations. The Land Act of 1998 and the National Environment Statute of 1995 protect customary interests in land, but they also authorize the government to exclude human activities in these areas, effectively nullifying the land rights of indigenous people. Uganda has never ratified the ILO convention 169, but is a signatory to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP).

    The Republic of Uganda would look favorably upon legislation that emphasizes the importance of continual economic and structural development and minimal human rights protections for indigenous populations. We understand the importance of protecting disadvantaged peoples, and we won’t be opposed to these protections so long as they don’t impede on the sovereignty of the Ugandan government.

  • EBaker
    EBaker November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social, Humanitarian & Cultural
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: United States of America
    Delegate: Elliot Baker

    Since colonialism first appeared, indigenous peoples have been oppressed and marginalized. The native peoples faced enslavement then and even now face discrimination as well as disproportionately high poverty rates. The United Nations adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007, as a non-binding document that establishes the rights of indigenous peoples as self-determined entities. While the United States initially voted against the declaration, its position is now in favor of the declaration and supports efforts to preserve indigenous cultures and communities.

    According to United States 2010 census information, 2.9 million people in the US identify as Native American or Alaska Native alone, with 573 tribes recognized by the United States’ Bureau of Indian Affairs. While the United States has had unfavorable relations with the indigenous peoples in the past, not allowing natives to vote in elections and forcing assimilation into mainstream American culture. Since then, however, the United States’ policies toward Native Americans have grown increasingly supportive towards improving and repairing the relationships between native communities and the federal government. In 2010, the United States reversed its position on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and in 2016, it adopted the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples under the Organization of American States. The US also provides government aid to impoverished native peoples on reservations and provides scholarships to Native American students.

    The United States believes that the rights of indigenous peoples should be protected and that a degree of self-government should be granted, but maintains that indigenous peoples do not have the rights to traditionally occupied lands or traditionally used resources. Indigenous peoples should exist as distinct collectives with protected rights and freedoms, and the United Nations should make continued efforts to establish guidelines and ideals on the rights of these peoples.

    The United States would support legislation aiming to preserve indigenous cultures without enforcing indigenous peoples’ right to land and resources. The delegation from the United States looks forward to working with its fellow delegations and hopes that the issues facing indigenous peoples can be addressed and that their rights continue to be protected.

  • Carlimaltbie
    Carlimaltbie November 14, 2018 Reply

    SOCHUM
    Indigenous People
    Czech Republic
    Carli Maltbie

    The rights of Indigenous People are constantly being infringed upon. As new countries colonize, conquer, and dominate, the original owners of the land are put more at risk of losing their heritage. Due to their small population of only 370 million people, they are relentlessly overlooked in government. Threatened are their way of life, economic viability, and human rights by people in power. This topic has no direct effect on the Czech Republic.

    The topic is not an issue in the Czech Republic. We have no reason to care for the state of Indigenous Peoples, as we are a landlocked nation that has made no colonial investments or efforts in the past. No government officials have spoken about this topic, nor have they considered the protection of their rights a priority in the government. The problem overall does not affect the Czech Republic; however, we see the conflicts it has caused in other nations and believe that the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is sufficient in preserving their rights.

    Though the Czech Republic has not had any issues with this topic, we trust in the United Nations’ Declaration, there is adequate attention paid to this topic. Though there are several governments that disobey the U.N., and continue to oppress their Natives, in reality, there is not much to be done about it. The United Nations passed its laws and put programs into place and some may nations decide to ignore them, that is a situation to deal with once it gets out of hand.

  • DavidCB
    DavidCB November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: SOCHUM
    Topic: Protecting the rights of indigenous people
    Country: Republic of Iraq
    Delegate: David Cornier-Bridgeforth
    In regard to protecting the rights of indigenous peoples in Iraq, it has been difficult to take action against discrimination because of extreme violence and warfare in Iraq. In Iraq the main Indigenous group are the Arab Marsh People. They live in the marshlands of southern Iraq and live off of the land. There are about 20,000 Marsh People according to a 2018 estimate. They have recently been at risk because of changes in their climate. Due to climate change many of their vital marshes are drying up. Once institutions are reinforced and order is restored, protecting the rights of all people in Iraq will be of utmost priority to the Iraqi government. Diversity of peoples in Iraq is strong and It hopes that it’s fellow countries will also support diversity in their borders.
    Iraq supported the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples(UNdrip), to ensure that the rights of indigenous peoples are respected. The resolution has been effective thus far, but perhaps more a demanding resolution could be made. To help limit discrimination and against indigenous groups Iraq would suggest more binding legislation be made to enforce that all countries respect the rights of those peoples. In this committee Iraq would like to work together with all other countries to draw up resolutions to adequately solve these issues. In the 2007 agreement (UNdrip) only 4 countries opposed and 11 abstained, It was a success in the voting record. Hopefully another successful resolution can be put forward and passed.

  • Isavan
    Isavan November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social Cultural Humanitarian (SocHum)
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Communities
    Country: The Republic of Honduras
    Delegate: Isabel Vander Molen

    In world where technological assets and economic prosperity is needed for the advancement of a sound, stable, and prosperous nation, certain international issues are overlooked. While nations are developing spacecrafts, complex economic infrastructure and controlling organized crime and terror, the need for protecting marginalized groups of society is still present, though often doesn’t strike most governments as an acute national problem.
    The Republic of Honduras hosts several of its own indigenous groups which make up an estimated 20% according to indigenous organization census from 2007. Among these indigenous groups, the Garifuna indigenous population has been the most active in advocating for indigenous political and social rights. Most of these indigenous groups have interests in reclaiming traditionally owned indigenous lands. Despite the issues prevalent in the lives of indigenous groups, the Republic of Honduras has focused more of it’s attention towards controlling organized crime, promoting economic infrastructure and monitoring solutions to immigration over the qualms of a small portion of the Honduran population.
    In order to fully and better recognize the portion of indigenous population in Honduras, the delegation of Honduras did vote in favor of the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous People in 2007. Furthermore, a more recent developing piece of legislation reinstates the process of dialogue between both indigenous parties and the Honduran government. This pending legislation states the importance of noting indigenous input from groups of indigenous people that are directly affected by Honduran government projects. Although there are some qualms about the authenticity of the legislation, reports such as the 2006 Situation of Indigenous People of Honduras done by Victoria Tauli-Corpuz offer comprehensive analysis of the issues faced by the Honduran indigenous groups. Using reports such as these, the Honduran government can grasp the scope and gravity of the indigenous situation and draw inspiration from proposed solutions to help Honduran minorities.
    In essence, while the Honduran government wants to keep drug trafficking, gang and criminal violence control as one of it’s priorities, we can acknowledge the fact that the struggle of indigenous communities is not to be overlooked and are equally if not more affected by violence and discrimination. In the design of a resolution, Honduras would appreciate if mentioning there would be a statement that details the negative impacts of public protests against the government when dealing with these issues and promote civilized negotiation and legislation based procedure.The delegation of Honduras would see it beneficial to provide territorial aid and protection to indigenous groups as well as supply young indigenous population with adequate education availability. By providing aid and education to tribal and indigenous groups, governments can prepare the population to not be dependent on the Honduran economy and government, but become a valuable contributor and integral part of Honduran society.

  • Zachste16
    Zachste16 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: Indonesia

    The country of Indonesia does not officially accept the term indigenous people as a majority if the country is made up of people and ethnic groups native to Indonesia and surrounding areas. That being said there has been frequent debate on the topic recently. The rights of Indigenous Indonesians are defined and protected in the Third Amendment to the Indonesian Constitution. There has been legislation passed as well further defining these rights. The current topic of debate is who owns all the rainforests. The indonesian Government has officially laid claim to almost all the forest land in the country. In 2014 President Joko Widodo handed over nine forest plots, around 8.2 million hectares of land, back to the indigenous peoples of Indonesia. Indonesia voted in favour of and adopted the UN Declaration of Human Rights passed by the GA in 2008. Indonesia looks to help native indonesians and indigenous peoples around the world living under oppression. Indonesia is looking for a comprehensive update to the current declaration as there are many holes in the resolution that must be patched in order to guarantee around 350 million people the rights they deserve.

  • Annagdev
    Annagdev November 14, 2018 Reply

    SocHum Committee
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Italy
    Anna Devarenne

    Worldwide, there are more than 5,000 groups of indigenous peoples. These groups often are marginalized and face discrimination from national governments and in legal systems. Human Rights officials and defenders often face violence and prejudice. The indigenous peoples of the world are in need of legislation to protect their lands, cultures, and livelihoods. Organizations such as Amnesty International help to aide the 370 million indigenous peoples in these ways. Amnesty is calling for governments around the world to implement the policies of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

    The indigenous peoples of Italy are known as the Italian Roma. The estimated population of this minority group is 150,000 out of the 60.6 billion population of Italy. A significant proportion de not have Italian citizenship. Romas hold a strained relationship with Italians, and are often referred to by Italian peoples as “gypsies”. These “gypsies” can be found in very poor living conditions and often in the streets panhandling and pickpocketing. Italian Romas isolate themselves from Italian society, living in illegal camps and avoiding government impositions such as taxes. It is virtually political suicide for government officials to show interest in aiding the Romas because of the large amount of disdain for the indigenous peoples. In fact, a 2008 survey found that 68 percent of Italian citizens wanted all Roma expelled from the country.

    The minority population of Italian Romas has been historically marginalized. Matteo Salvini, the Deputy Prime Minister of Italy, further stigmatizes Romas and perpetuates the mistreatment of the indigenous peoples by the national government. In April 2017, Italian authorities forcibly evicted hundreds of Roma from Gianturco to Naples, leaving families homeless and further segregated. Additionally, Salvini has embedded the popular prejudice against Romas by calling for the expulsion of all non-Italian Roma and a nationwide census of all Roma in the country.

  • Agoldenberg276
    Agoldenberg276 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social, Cultural, and Humanitarian Committee
    The French Republic
    Delegate: Alex Goldenberg
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

    Indigenous People are people who lived in the same place their family has lived in for generations.These people make up fifteen percent of those experiencing poverty. Their small population limits their political authority. This makes it easier for government to control their land. It is important that the government recognizes the rights of the Indigenous People and not threaten their lifestyle. In the past, governments have silenced activists for Indigenous People’s rights through violence. Recently, steps have been taken to protect the rights for Indigenous Peoples. The General Assembly, in 2007, adopted the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This guarantees the freedom and right to all fundamental freedoms. Though steps have been taken to better the Indigenous People’s rights, governments resume to infringe on the Indigenous Peoples rights.
    In the past, France colonized many places for the land’s resources and for trading. In 1883, the French sent military expedition to Madagascar. This resulted the First Franco-Hova War. The French won the war in 1895, and Madagascar came under French rule. Soon after World War Two, in 1947, Madagascar wanted independence causing the Malagasy uprising to occur. France defeated Madagascar, but the French gave Madagascar options to gain some independence through the constitutional referendum of September 1958. Madagascar chose to be a state that will continue to deal with French republic. This agreement has been a success, and to this day, relations between Madagascar and France are strong. The French government aids Madagascar in developing assistance, and Madagascar holds thousands of French expatriates. The Comoros Islands, also colonized by the French had a similar path to independence. At the end of the 19th century, France colonized the Islands. After World War Two, The Comoros Island wanted Independence. An agreement with France was reached to let Comoro gain independence in 1978. However, the island Mayotte voted to continue to be under French control.The island of New Caledonia came under French control in 1853. The French used it as a penal colony. In the 1980s, violent conflicts between French forces and the local Caledonian population, the Kanaks. The Kanks took a number of hostages. A French assault to free the hostages followed.This adult resulted in a loss of over twenty lives. The French and Kanaks noticed the damage the conflict caused. France gave New Caledonia an opportunity to vote to gain independence or stay under French control if they behaved for a decade. The referendum, which was just held this month, a majority of Caledonia citizens voted to stay under French rule.
    Because France has colonized so many places, it has experience with the Indigenous People. France encourages governments to listen to the Indigenous People, and try to negotiate a solution that will work out for both sides. By the Indigenous People and Government working together, a solution can be reached.

  • Hdavidson032
    Hdavidson032 November 14, 2018 Reply

    The Islamic Republic of Iran
    SocHum
    Mattawan High School

    The Islamic Republic of Iran recognizes the push to protect indigenous peoples as one of the most important of our time. We understand that indigenous peoples across the globe face atrocities and oppression every day, and we feel significant pressure to protect our most prominent indigenous groups, like the Kurds. Iran’s Kurdish population of about 7 million makes them the largest of any indigenous group in Iran, and official Iranian-Kurdish relations date back to the Iran-Iraq War in 1980. Since then, the Iranian government has supported the Kurds against oppressive governments and terrorist groups.

    Today, the terrorist group ISIS has marked Iranian Kurds, especially those practicing Sunni Islam, as one of the most vulnerable groups in the region, and frequently target them as recruits and victims of attacks. The Iranian delegation would look favorably on resolutions that work to protect indigenous peoples and counteract terrorist groups like ISIS.

  • Montlil
    Montlil November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social Humanitarian and Cultural
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Sweden
    Lily Montague

    Protecting the rights of Indigenous peoples is an issue in countries all over the world. Indigenous people make up about 5% of the worlds population, which may not seem like a large amount, their rights still matter.
    Sweden itself has delt with issues with indigenous people, including the Sami people which have a population in Sweden of between 20,000-40,000 people. Beginning with the Swedish Reindeer Grazing Act of 1886, the government took away all previously established land rights of the Sami people and declared their land property of the crown, as well as provoking customary law and traditions. Since then, the Swedish government has regulated the Sami people through legislation such as the Reindeer Husbandry Act, which makes sure the people engage in their reindeer husbandry within their given land. Also, the Reindeer Pasture Law of 1928 limited the ownership of reindeer to herders and their families. The Swedish government does recognize cultural rights and traditions of the Sami people, specifically by creating the Sami language the official minority language of Sweden, but they do place those few agricultural restrictions. And not until recently have the Sami people gained their right to land as in 2011, the Swedish Supreme Court ruled in favor of giving a certain area of land to the Sami people. The Swedish government also recognizes the right of the Sami people to self govern, by establishing a Sami parliament in 1993 that deals with issues regarding the Sami people.
    Overall, Sweden believes that the rights of indigenous peoples should be protected. Sweden voted in favor of adopting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Sweden is also in support of the ILO Convention C169 Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention but that was proposed in 1989 and still not yet ratified. Sweden is also working with Norway and Finland on adopting the Nordic Sami Convention, which focuses on rights of the Sami. Sweden’s Sami parliament spoke up on the issue of representation, advocating for legislative and administrative change to gain more representation for indigenous peoples. Sweden supports these proposals but decided that legislation from the Swedish government is needed to put these into effect in Sweden.

  • avatar image
    Keegan McCalmont November 14, 2018 Reply

    Keegan McCalmont
    Republic of Peru
    Social Human
    City High

    The indigenous people of Peru constitute about 25.7% – 31% of the population, 95.8% of which are Andean and 3.3% are Amazonian. Over 65 ethnic groups with 16 language classes reside in Peru. Peru is also home to a number of uncontacted tribes, the highest concentration after Brazil and New Guinea.
    Within the Peruvian education system, there are significant gaps between native Peruvians and non-native students. Language barriers are a significant aspect of these troubles. Bilingual education programs have been initiated to teach in both Spanish and Quechua, and Quechua is recognized as an official language.
    Many groups exist as political advocates for indigenous groups including MATSES, the Movement in the Amazon for Tribal Subsistence and Economic Sustainability, and AIDSEP, the Association of Inter-Etnica para el Desarollo de la Selva Peruana. MATSES works for cultural survival and AIDSEP works to reclaim and seized by settlers.
    Indigenous peoples of Peru hold land in communal reserves, the largest of which belongs to the Matses people on the Peruvian border with Brazil near the Javary River. Various laws within Peru recognize the native communal areas of the country.
    INDEPA, the Institute for Andean Amazonian Afro-Peruvian People acts as an autonomous public body established by the Congress of the Republic. Attempts to dissolve this institution have been thwarted from within the government,
    Peru has signed the ILO Convention 169. ILO Convention 169 is an important document guaranteeing the rights of of native peoples. The convention forbids government from pursuing approaches deemed integrationist. Protects the right of indigenous peoples to choose whether to integrate or remain culturally and politically independent.
    Peru’s primary goal in this conference will be to work to reaffirm the ILO Convention 169 and work with the other signatories of the convention for further protection of self-determination of indigenous groups.

  • Taylorfoster0514
    Taylorfoster0514 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Taylor Foster
    Bolivia
    Social Humanitarian and Cultural
    Vicksburg High School
    Over 50% of Bolivia’s citizens are indigenous. A large part of the population is apart of indigenous group called the Quechua. These peoples rights are important and need to be protected. The culture is unique and has been apart of the country since the time of the Aztecs.
    There has been action taken to defend their rights such as the signing by the Bolivian government of the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention in 1989 which protects Indigenous peoples, the approval of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 which recognizes the rights of Indigenous people, and the election of the first Indigenous man, Evo Morales in 2006, who bettered the countries economy and the recognition of the Indigenous population in Bolivia.
    Evo Morales is actually apart of the problem in Bolivia today. At first he did great things that improved the country but now he has been in office for three terms, when the limit is two, and plans to run again for a fourth even though the people of Bolivia are screaming no with protest. He also let his government build a road through a national park in a northern amazonian area and spend 34 million dollars on a huge house instead of on social issues that matter. This is just one example of a way the government ignores its Indigenous peoples voices.
    Bolivia as a country has taken large strides throughout the years for Indigenous people but still has a far way to go. Some Countries around the world are not even as developed as we are. We as a committee need to find a peaceful resolution that works for everyone to help recognize, develop, and protect the rights of Indigenous people.

  • Davisbr
    Davisbr November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee : Social, Humanitarian, and Cultural Committee
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People
    Country : Greece
    Brandon Davis

    Communities around the globe share culture and ideas which stemmed from original sources; Indigenous People. Today, roughly 5% of the world’s population is composed of people with predominantly indigenous heritage. Human rights studies within countries having a relatively large indigenous population have found that communities and individuals of native heritage commonly face persecution in these nations. Discrimination is often from non-native members of the populous, but can stem from government itself, as well as be written into policy. Many of these issues are based upon land disputes, with Natives occupying the same area for many generations, development projects are likely to conflict with their territories. Further issues include higher rates of poverty, malnutrition, and legal persecution as well as decreased education and healthcare access.

    Macedonians, which as a whole only make up .01% of the country’s population, were not accepted for a long time and often rejected by the Greek population and government. The country itself of Macedonia has been a source of conflict in the region that the two countries occupy. It lies at the center of a dispute between Greeks and Macedonians over which group has the right to identify as the true Macedonian people. The human rights of the Macedonian minority in northern Greece is often the source of conflict between disputing groups. In the past, the Greek government has consistently denied the existence of a Macedonian minority in northern Greece and went as far to adopt policies of forced assimilation towards the indigenous Macedonian population.

    Integration of Indigenous minorities along with equality of both populations is an import first step in solving problems that stem from a disputing public. The indigenous should be recognized with equal standing as other any other citizens, with laws put into place that protect those given rights. In some countries, such as Canada, a system where Natives are able to govern and regulate their own population has seen success. Using this principle as a solution in other countries would likely help accomplish more civil handling of human rights. A promise to allow native territories protection from development and residency of other people, along with being allowed to delve in their religious traditions within that protected territory is another major step.

  • Brendan
    Brendan November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: The Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: Palestine

    The rights of indigenous people have been encroached upon for centuries. A multitude of nations internationally have impeached their will before in the past where it was not wanted nor welcomed, such as Israel’s continuous involvement in Palestine. With that being said, the United Nations has already worked extensively in the past to protect the rights of the indigenous people and their homes, specifically through the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (or UNDRIP), and Palestine fervently supports this declaration. The declaration explicitly delineates upon the rights of indigenous people and was signed by nearly every country in the UN–144 to be exact, with only four who were against it. Palestine is a firm proponent of both this declaration as well as any provision, resolution or movement that will aid and help defend the status and land of indigenous people.
    Palestine, evidently, has a tumultuous past plagued with war and conflict. The major catalyst of this conflict that persists to this day is the Israeli forces infringing upon land that is not rightfully theirs. Palestinians are slaughtered and bombed while Israel continues to take more land that does belong to them. Because of the intense schism between Palestine and Israel, Palestine has a certain vehemence with the cause of indigenous people, especially considering its own citizens are indigenous to their land and have been met with prolix persecution and violence. Palestine would like to see papers passed that further uphold and affirm the rights of indigenous people as well as deploring nations who are seeking to or have already encroached on the aforementioned rights. Palestine would like to ensure that no nation could bring forth such vitriol and larceny of land that is not actually theirs like Israel has in the past and today. The collective duty of this committee will be to bolster and preserve liberties already expressed in the UN and to condemn self-righteous, sanctimonious nations who seek to reap land that they do not possess by any means necessary.

  • Blaisegourley
    Blaisegourley November 14, 2018 Reply

    Social Humanitarian and Cultural
    Rights of Indigenous People
    Cuba
    Blaise Gourley

    The UN has pushed to expand the rights of indigenous people throughout the world. Indigenous people have the right to be equal to other populations, share human rights and fundamental freedoms as well as their own distinct political, legal, economic, social, and cultural practices and institutions. Efforts such as, the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples passed in 2007 and adopted by 144 countries to ensure minimal standards for living be applied to indigenous people and to ensure their rights. Regardless, many governments continue to violate this declaration and harass these indigenous people.
    The conflict of protecting indigenous people’s rights is one of the least of concerns for Cuba. Although many governments across the world continue to violate the rights of indigenous people, Cuba does not share this problem that other countries are facing.
    The origins of Cuba’s indigenous people date back to before 1492. The two distinct indigenous groups were the Taíno and Ciboney. Both of these indigenous groups were self-sustaining and had similar practices and beliefs. Oppression of these indigenous people started when the Spanish rule took over, dating back to the 1500’s. During this time many indigenous people were put in reservations and many of them died due to the conditions they were put in.
    Many of these indigenous groups rapidly incorporated themselves into invading groups, such as the Taino or also known as the Arawaks. Their poetry, songs, and art can still be found throughout Cuba and other developments such as tobacco in forms of cigars.
    The rough clash of the indigenous people and first invaders of Cuba may have needed guidance, but in current day Cuba the protection of the rights of Indigenous People’s is not necessary.
    A solution to extend more protection is to extend repercussions to countries that continue to violate the declaration from the United Nations. Such repercussions that would be enforced would also impact the entire United Nations community and help indigenous people enjoy their full rights. And not only protecting the rights already established but to put more emphasis to this topic at the international community table and get more countries involved if rights are being violated.
    The rights of indigenous people are human rights. Although Cuba may not be experiencing a catastrophic problem right now with this issue, other countries are. It is the job of the United Nations to hold other countries accountable, especially to establish legitimacy of the United Nations and since there has been prior declarations passed, so it is unnecessary to pass another one but instead focus on enforcing it.

  • Arjunk
    Arjunk November 14, 2018 Reply

    Netherlands
    SOCHUM
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous People
    Arjun Kumar
    Indigenous peoples have been marginalized across the world for hundreds of years. These victims of centuries of discrimination live all over the world, the Netherlands itself acknowledges that it has been responsible for this in the past. We have spent too long considering indigenous rights as less important than the rights of other people. Indigenous people make up 15% of the “extremely poor” category. By failing to acknowledge this, we are blatantly ignoring the UN Declaration of Human Rights.
    The Netherlands believes that it is paramount to prioritize the rights of marginalized groups in our world. In 2007, the Netherlands voted in favor of the passed UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Denying the problem of indigenous marginalization is the main reason this problem has worsened. Powerful nations have the ability and should assist indigenous peoples within their territory.
    The Netherlands looks forward to working with all other nations to expand the rights of indigenous people and to make sure that the 2007 Declaration is followed by all member states. We wish this committee to implement financial aid to indigenous people and make their protection supervised by a UN body.
    Sources:
    https://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/indigenouspeoples
    https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/08/09/dispatches-protecting-rights-indigenous-peoples
    https://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/DRIPS_en.pdf

  • Tragan2018
    Tragan2018 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Tyler Ragan
    Kalamazoo Central Highschool
    Libya
    SocHum

    The Amazigh culture was oppressed under the Gaddafi regime, after the Libyan civil war in 2011 Amazigh culture was recognized in the new constitution but not to the extent Amazigh cultural leaders believed it should be. Amazighs believe they have been betrayed by fellow revolutionaries in the new constitution.
    Libyan leaders are fairly neutral on the subject however, the constitution recognizes the Arabic language, but not Amazigh dialect as an official language, even though some form of Amazigh is spoken by roughly 2 million Libyans. Some of Libya’s administrative buildings do fly the flag of the Amazigh people though.

    There isn’t much signed legislature on native culture in Libya but existing legislature makes the Amazigh language into a cultural heritage language instead of an official Libyan language.
    This piece of legislature does not affect Libya very much, but has sparked some movements for recognition of the Amazigh language as an official language in Libya. This can be seen in the boycott of the Libyan constitution in 2014 and more recent movements by Amazigh speakers in Libya.
    The UN has taken no action against the issue, however the GNA (Government of National Accord) has given cultural heritage status to Amazigh, but doesn’t recognize the language as official.

    Libya believes indigenous people should be celebrated but to an extent, recognized, but as cultural heritage, not officially.
    Libya’s neighboring countries of Algeria and Tunisia have some of the same viewpoints and statistics as Libya on the indigenous cultures, recognizing the language of Amazigh and having a fairly large native population.

  • Gabriellahernandez
    Gabriellahernandez November 14, 2018 Reply

    Venezuela
    SOCHUM
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Gabriella Hernandez
    Indigenous people have been a highly disregarded topic when it comes to government. Most governments tend to ignore the natural people of the land that they have taken control over. Most of these peoples are discriminated, criminalized or have suffered greatly when their land has been taken away. The United Nations has taken historical steps with the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
    The UN declaration of the rights of indeginous peoples declares the rights that “constitute the minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world.” The document protects collective rights that may not be addressed in other human rights charters that emphasize individual rights, and it also safeguards the individual rights of Indigenous people. Venezuela has signed and adopted this resolution since sustaining the rights of the Indigenous rights of native Venezuelans.
    Venezuela is still very behind in the absolute rights of all native groups. Venezuela is in support of any resolution that addresses land rights, and language use in the government.

  • avatar image
    Joey Mooney November 14, 2018 Reply

    SOCHUM
    Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Egypt
    Joey Mooney
    The country of Egypt
    The protection of the rights of indigenous people is incredibly important to the nation of Egypt. While we recognize that efforts have been made to support these people we feel as though there is still a lot of work for us to do.
    We feel as though any contributions to the protection of these people are able to benefit the world as a whole. With many immigrants from the east as well as the south, Egypt is a hub for these people and is willing to accept as well as provide any aid we possibly can. With this heavy traffic of immigrants we know the struggles that they go through and the resources that a struggling or developed country made need to help support these people as they make their trek into a new world. We feel as though the oppression of these peoples should be put to an end immediately and will support any efforts made toward the prosper of these people. We recognize that these people are struggling as they either have to flee other countries to find better conditions and the transition process should be as easy as possible.
    When looking at resolutions that are made we feel as though funding should be aimed towards the effort to end any and all oppression on all of these peoples. When addressing the issues, we feel as though countries who provide legitimate efforts to help better the incoming traffic are the ones who should have a legitimate voice in the topic and be examples as we discuss the issue of how to help these people.

  • Hwillit
    Hwillit November 14, 2018 Reply

    Guatemala on the Rights and Situations of Indigenous Peoples

    Before the arrival of Spanish conquerors in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, large societies developed up and down the South American continent. After the arrival of European colonizing powers and the subsequent denigration of these peoples, the balance of power was skewed heavily in the favor of the white rulers. This distorted arrangement of representation away from the indigenous majority and toward the wealthy European elite has left residues which still exists today. People of indigenous descent disproportionally face homelessness and joblessness at a rate dozens of times higher than their peers of European descent. Indigenous people are disenfranchised en mass, and robbed time and time again of their right to own land. This inequity pervades throughout nearly all of South and Latin America, and exists in large part across the world.
    A vast and notable 50.1% of Guatemala’s population consists of people of direct Mayan heritage. Of this group, there are dozens of distinct languages and associated cultures. It is because Guatemala is such a unique mix of rich cultures that they have such an interest in their protection and preservation. Although we strive toward this goal every day, 79% of indigenous people live in poverty. The storied cultures and traditions of indigenous people are just now becoming a celebrated part of Guatemalan identity, as we work to provide equal opportunities for all.
    Guatemala believes that indigenous cultures should be preserved and protected. Indigenous people should have access to their own land. We support a resolution prohibiting the theft of traditional lands from indigenous peoples and ensuring access to basic rights such as equal and attainable suffrage.

  • Akuzee
    Akuzee November 14, 2018 Reply

    Adam Kuzee
    South Korea
    Sochum
    City High Middle School

    The rights of indigenous peoples has been debated since before the formation of the United Nations itself. Some of humanity’s largest injustices have been direct results of the undermining of said rights. As this debate continues into the present, indigenous peoples face many of the same issues they’ve faced throughout history: fewer resources to defend their rights and under representation in policy making regarding their rights. The World Bank reports that five percent of the world population are indigenous, yet they rarely are given the opportunity to represent themselves in full. This issue spans a variety of topics, from the rights of individuals to rights over natural resources. These factors make this topic of great consequence, and put pressure on this council to consider a wide variety of factors and solutions.
    South Korea stands behind a policy of full self determination for indigenous peoples. It believes that it is the responsibility of the United Nations to stand by the commitments laid forth in the first article of the United Nations Charter: “The Purposes of the United Nations are to develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples”.
    This essential commitment of the United Nations makes it imperative to improve representation of indigenous peoples in the negotiation of their rights. South Korea believes the resolution to this issue must include considerations for the improvement of the representation of indigenous peoples in legal bodies, focus on the importance of fair negotiation between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples, emphasis on the necessity of balanced sharing of natural resources.

  • Nhahn
    Nhahn November 14, 2018 Reply

    Indigenous activists in Columbia are attempting to reclaim native lands, calling it the “liberation of Mother Earth”, a movement to reclaim ancestral land from sugar plantations, farms and tourist resorts.
    The Nasa people, the largest group of indigenous people, see this in spiritual terms. For the Nasa it is the newest phase in a struggle for land and a clash between two contrasting views: one that wishes for harmony with nature, and one they see as interested only in making as much money as possible, regardless of the impact on the people and the environment.
    Environmental concerns are strong. The Nasa say they should not be living in such large numbers near sacred sites near water sources, as this can be bad for the water source. This position has pitted them against the law and some of Colombia’s biggest property owners and global sugar suppliers.
    The Colombian government sees things differently. It says the state has a responsibility to protect legally recognized property ownership. Colombia is supposed to be in the midst of peace, however, as more people move into the indigenous peoples territory to claim land, (partly because the government is granting more concessions for mining and water use) battles between indigenous people and new comers occur.
    The minister for the environment and sustainable development, Luis Murillo, said the state’s security was the answer to environmental problems, not the problem. “We need to move very quickly to establish a presence in areas where we didn’t have a presence before.”
    The indigenous people’s rights to their lands should be protected – they have had centuries of destruction of their culture by Europeans – it is time to give them peace.

    Indigenous activists in Columbia are attempting to reclaim native lands, calling it the “liberation of Mother Earth”, a movement to reclaim ancestral land from sugar plantations, farms and tourist resorts.
    The Nasa people, the largest group of indigenous people, see this in spiritual terms. For the Nasa it is the newest phase in a struggle for land and a clash between two contrasting views: one that wishes for harmony with nature, and one they see as interested only in making as much money as possible, regardless of the impact on the people and the environment.
    Environmental concerns are strong. The Nasa say they should not be living in such large numbers near sacred sites near water sources, as this can be bad for the water source. This position has pitted them against the law and some of Colombia’s biggest property owners and global sugar suppliers.
    The Colombian government sees things differently. It says the state has a responsibility to protect legally recognized property ownership. Colombia is supposed to be in the midst of peace, however, as more people move into the indigenous peoples territory to claim land, (partly because the government is granting more concessions for mining and water use) battles between indigenous people and new comers occur.
    The minister for the environment and sustainable development, Luis Murillo, said the state’s security was the answer to environmental problems, not the problem. “We need to move very quickly to establish a presence in areas where we didn’t have a presence before.”
    The indigenous people’s rights to their lands should be protected – they have had centuries of destruction of their culture by Europeans – it is time to give them peace.

    Indigenous activists in Columbia are attempting to reclaim native lands, calling it the “liberation of Mother Earth”, a movement to reclaim ancestral land from sugar plantations, farms and tourist resorts.
    The Nasa people, the largest group of indigenous people, see this in spiritual terms. For the Nasa it is the newest phase in a struggle for land and a clash between two contrasting views: one that wishes for harmony with nature, and one they see as interested only in making as much money as possible, regardless of the impact on the people and the environment.
    Environmental concerns are strong. The Nasa say they should not be living in such large numbers near sacred sites near water sources, as this can be bad for the water source. This position has pitted them against the law and some of Colombia’s biggest property owners and global sugar suppliers.
    The Colombian government sees things differently. It says the state has a responsibility to protect legally recognized property ownership. Colombia is supposed to be in the midst of peace, however, as more people move into the indigenous peoples territory to claim land, (partly because the government is granting more concessions for mining and water use) battles between indigenous people and new comers occur.
    The minister for the environment and sustainable development, Luis Murillo, said the state’s security was the answer to environmental problems, not the problem. “We need to move very quickly to establish a presence in areas where we didn’t have a presence before.”
    The indigenous people’s rights to their lands should be protected – they have had centuries of destruction of their culture by Europeans – it is time to give them peace.

  • E.l.i.z._44
    E.l.i.z._44 November 14, 2018 Reply

    Committee: SocHum
    Topic: Protecting the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
    Country: Singapore
    Delegate: Elizabeth Vredevelt

    The rights of indigenous people have too frequently been violated as a result of ignorant views on race and cultural supremacy. While some countries have taken steps towards restitution, many still choose to silence the voices of those whose cries the land has heard longest.

    In Singapore we feel all ethnicities and races must work together peaceably. Our Housing and Development board created our Ethnic Integration Policy in 1989 to “preserve… [our] multi-cultural identity,… [and] promote racial integration and harmony” by setting proportions for each ethnic group in housing estates. We also celebrate Racial Harmony Day on July 21st as a way to remember the chaos and division of the race riots of 1964. To conclude, Singapore is a diverse country that grants full citizenship to indigenous peoples and believes they are entitled to all government protection as much or more as non-natives.

  • NickW28
    NickW28 November 15, 2018 Reply

    Committee SOCHUM
    Vietnam
    Nicholas Wickerham
    Vietnam does not recognize people as indigenous as they are merely an ethnicity. As a socialist republic it violates our principles to award ethnicities special privileges and rights such as those in western nations. We believe in assimilating these cultures into our own avoiding the tensions that can be presented through having these rights being awarded to them. Vietnam believes that the final decision must be made by the individual country. We have had much western interference and will not tolerate western aggression in our country. This plays not in the hands of this comottie but our own governments. By allowing outside outside influence to control our country’s designs our country will be the one that suffers the most. We are providing these ethnic groups known as the Khmer the basic necessities to live just as any other vietnamese citizen is awarded. We will never give groups an advantage due to their ethnic background or geographical location. We will only support a resolution that allows for each country to preserve their sovereignty to the fullest extent by making this decision up to individual governments with no western interference in our countries or our practices as that will lead to conflict.

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